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Australian Members

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by earthdragon, Nov 18, 2008.

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  1. thebrownman

    thebrownman Senior member

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    They trade on the basis of name.

    Manufacturers misuse Made in Italy in much the same way that consumers belittle Made in China/other Asian nation.
     
  2. lachyzee

    lachyzee Senior member

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    Some people are prepared to pay a tonne for a genuine item from a famous brand name.

    This attitude is extremely prevalent in Asian countries and cultures for some reason that I don't understand (funnily enough, knock offs are also very popular).

    The clientele of all the fancy stores in Crown is, for example, almost exclusively Asian: some tourists, some Melbournians.

    I have a friend who works at one of them... I think Prada? Anyway she tells me that 95% of the sales are to Asians. The staff (who get commission) have to be quite disciplined so that they continue to treat non-Asian customers the same as Asian customers, even though they know they aren't going to buy anything. She says that Asian customers almost never ask the price of an item before buying, and that the old adage of "if you have to ask how much it costs then you can't afford it" holds true every time...
     
  3. The Ernesto

    The Ernesto Senior member

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    Or that you can afford it but are curious about how much people are prepared to pay for a label.
     
  4. Prince of Paisley

    Prince of Paisley Senior member

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    Blake's 7
    Dr Who: the Pertwee Years
    The Fugitive (TV series)
    Perry Mason (early years)
    Poirot (Suchet > Ustinov).

    George Gently S1 was excellent, though I never really got into S2.
     
  5. lachyzee

    lachyzee Senior member

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    No, that's not what I meant.

    If they ask the price, then they are not going to buy it.
     
  6. The Ernesto

    The Ernesto Senior member

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    OK. So that should be the adage.
     
  7. DartagnanRed

    DartagnanRed Senior member

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    Either way, many products are made by Chinese whether it be in Italy or China. For brief info see: http://articles.latimes.com/2008/feb/20/world/fg-madeinitaly20

    About 20 years ago, the Italian textile and clothing industry was petrified that cheaper produced clothing and accessories in China would kill them off. Very strangely, what eventuated is that the industry actually grew, because a burgeoning middle class in places like China started purchasing Italian goods. Any luxury brand which doesn't see China as its most important market is lagging well behind.

    For a double dose of irony, when the Chinese pay enormous prices for the "Made in Italy" tag, many of those goods are produced by Chinese immigrants in Italy!
     
  8. lachyzee

    lachyzee Senior member

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    It's not, though.

    The famous JP Morgan quote means what it means: you can't afford it i.e. you won't be buying it.
     
  9. Prince of Paisley

    Prince of Paisley Senior member

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    If you have to ask the price, you probably haven't checked the pricetag or the website.
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2012
  10. Windowpane1967

    Windowpane1967 Senior member

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    + 1
     
  11. The Ernesto

    The Ernesto Senior member

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    I understand that many people go in to Prada, have a poke around, ask for the price and then go and say to their friends 'I saw this bag in Prada...guess how much it was...'. I was just making a (perhaps muddled) point that people can go in and ask a price, be able to afford, it and choose not to buy it. Have done it myself.
     
  12. Petepan

    Petepan Senior member

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    I think everyone here understands why, just that we are too politically correct in this age of "misogyny".

    It is a phenomenon that occurs when money is begotten too easily without effort or merit. And not necessarily restricted to Asians, we can include some Russians too.

    Hence the reason why there is a roaring trade within China for empty bottles of Lafite. Hell, you can flog a Bin 389 in a Grange bottle, and the chances of someone knowing is less than 1%, and even if that person knows, he/she will keep quiet if some other big shot is paying for the meal.

    Go figure that the annual production of Lafite is 30k per annum, and consumption in China is running at 300k bottle per year. Same story with high quality maotai.

    And go figure why Starbucks cups are reused in China.

    p/s I always thought the word misogyny sounds like a Japanese broth concocted by a mythical creature residing in a lamp.
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2012
  13. lachyzee

    lachyzee Senior member

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    Yes I understand.

    What I was trying to say was, according to my friend in Prada Melbourne, Western customers don't buy 95% of the time that they come into the store, and if they ask the price then this figure goes up to 100%.

    I won't speculate as to their motivations!
     
  14. The Ernesto

    The Ernesto Senior member

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    lol. It's intriguing isn't it?

    The whole Asian obsession with 'luxury' brands amazes me. It certainly has breathed new life into that retail sector.
     
  15. dreamspace

    dreamspace Senior member

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    Nouveau riche.

    Same thing with the Russians here in Europe, after the economy exploded...it's like that one joke:

    "Look at my new tie," says a New Russian to his colleague. "I bought it for 500 dollars in the store over there." "You got yourself conned," says the other. "You could have paid twice as much for the same one just across the street!"
     
  16. catpower

    catpower Active Member

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    It's not necessarily just the Chinese either - it's the same phenomenon in India and other countries where a large part of the population suddenly comes into significant amount of wealth. For them, social status is manifest in Western brands. To an extent you can't really blame them either for a lot of them have come from pretty humble backgrounds and spent their whole lives trying to climb that social and economic ladder. As for their kids, the generation hitting their teens now.....well that's another kettle of utterly effed up fish.
     
  17. DartagnanRed

    DartagnanRed Senior member

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    This is related to what I was saying yesterday (sandwiched between a futile eBay argument). At this stage, certain pockets of Chinese and other Asian culture are exceptionally vain. There's a misconception that vanity is a "self" centred concept, but in reality those who are vain care more about what everyone else thinks of them than what they think of themselves. This is the opposite of being self centred.

    In China, when you purchase a LV monogram trucker's hat, that purchase is more about others than it is about you. In Petepan's example, it's more looking like you're drinking the Grange than actually drinking it.

    This is of course, partly to blame on the West, or at least the portrayal of the West that Chinese people choose to see.

    IMO, releasing oneself from this vain way of consuming is liberating.

    There is a strange pleasure in purchasing/wearing/consuming something of extreme quality, purely for your own enjoyment, that you know the vast majority of people will never care to appreciate.
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2012
  18. The Ernesto

    The Ernesto Senior member

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    Perhaps things are changing slightly...

    http://www.brandchannel.com/home/po...fies-Luxury-Handwringing-in-China-092512.aspx

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-09-24/vuitton-gucci-risk-first-mover-disadvantage-in-china.html

    'One challenge for luxury brands is the aspirational market is evaporating, as Reuters notes, on October 1st. That's when all civil servants in China must adhere to a “frugal working style” rule that will prohibit wearing or toting any luxury goods to the workplace. This clampdown (which also affects corporate gift-giving) resulted from “a string of high-profile incidents, including a high-speed Ferrari crash reportedly involving the son of a senior public official and a local government official photographed flaunting luxury watches beyond the reach of his salary,” Reuters notes.'
     
  19. DartagnanRed

    DartagnanRed Senior member

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    See the video of that ferrari crash? Pretty chilling.
     
  20. DartagnanRed

    DartagnanRed Senior member

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    The articles that you linked to describe an inevitable process. Once the market is saturated with "blingy" goods, consumers will start to look for other traits. This may be more interesting design, or it may be a thirst for greater quality.
     
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