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Shaunm88

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I’m stuck with normal shopping hours. So far I wouldnt say we have been lucky but we certainly aren’t stuck without anything. We are just living with supplies how we normally would.

About the only thing we have bought extra is baby wipes with an expectant baby next month. That and hand sanitiser are the only products they feel a genuine shortage will occur as the usage of these has increased a great deal. The rest whilst demand and purchasing has increased you physically cant use all that toiler paper (someone did the maths and for what people are buying they need to go for number twos 182 times a day).

On positive news I also got my qantas status extended. I went from platinum one a few years ago, haven’t flown by paying for a while and every year my status has dropped to platinum then last year to gold. I was to drop to silver again but managed to keep gold with no flights in 20 months.
 

conqueror

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i was finally able to get a single can of tomatoes yesterday after four consecutive days of empty shelves. here it's still impossible to buy pasta, rice, TP, or hand sanitiser.
 

Geoffrey Firmin

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I’m stuck with normal shopping hours. So far I wouldnt say we have been lucky but we certainly aren’t stuck without anything. We are just living with supplies how we normally would.

About the only thing we have bought extra is baby wipes with an expectant baby next month. That and hand sanitiser are the only products they feel a genuine shortage will occur as the usage of these has increased a great deal. The rest whilst demand and purchasing has increased you physically cant use all that toiler paper (someone did the maths and for what people are buying they need to go for number twos 182 times a day).

On positive news I also got my qantas status extended. I went from platinum one a few years ago, haven’t flown by paying for a while and every year my status has dropped to platinum then last year to gold. I was to drop to silver again but managed to keep gold with no flights in 20 months.
Congratulations on the imminent arrival of your progeny. As my favourite Vulcan used to say ”Live long and prosper.”

I read where one of the major gin distillers have moved into the production of hand sanitiser. So that should improve supply.
 

Journeyman

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I read where one of the major gin distillers have moved into the production of hand sanitiser. So that should improve supply.
Hand sanitiser for external use, gin for internal use - protect both the inside and the outside at the same time!
 

Shaunm88

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Congratulations on the imminent arrival of your progeny. As my favourite Vulcan used to say ”Live long and prosper.”

I read where one of the major gin distillers have moved into the production of hand sanitiser. So that should improve supply.
Thanks.

I did ask a doctor friend of mine if whisky would help kill any virus and the good news is it will. The bad news he said is you would be dead with the amount you need in your body. For that aspect I’ll continue to have the odd whisky.
 

meister

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What's the oldest pair of shoes anyone has they still wear?

Mine are Allen Edmonds Strand boots in dark brown. First shoes I purchased after joining StyleForum. Shoe trees + shoe cream + rotation has kept them in good nik for 8 years now.
These are very early Johnston and Murphy spades. Feeling their years now ...maybe late 1930s/early 40s.
 

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Geoffrey Firmin

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south side of canberra. i moved here a few years ago for work.
You’ll have to put a raiding party together and hit Northside IGA stores which are well stocked. Coles Woolworths not so much. Dog food that’s what I need, but can I find any dog mince? No.
 

Journeyman

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An interesting, and thought-provoking, article from the ABC:


Essentially, it proposes three options:
- A, which is what Australia is doing now. This involves moderate measures, including people to work from home where possible, engage in social distancing, but keep schools open and not force any shutdowns. It is estimated that this situation will last 12-18 months.
- B, trace and track every single diagnosed infection and make those people self-isolate. Of course, A and B can be undertaken at the same time, if a country or area has the resources. The author considers that most of Australia is now beyond this, as we have too many infections.
- C, shut everything down for a period of time. This is, of course, essentially what China did in Wuhan and what appears to be happening in northern Italy. Shut everything non-essential - businesses, schools, factories and so on - for a period of perhaps 8 weeks. Keep some supermarkets open and, of course, keep hospitals open but, apart from that, shut everything down. This will starve the virus of opportunities to spread and should dramatically lower numbers.

Frankly, I think that C is the best option.

At present, the government is taking the softer "A" approach.

It wants to keep schools open to minimise disruption and, of course, closing schools means that parents have to stay home, particularly with younger children. However, this means that although the disruption might be a bit less, there is still considerable disruption. Anecdotally, about 20 - 25% of children are being kept home from school anyway, the vast majority of restaurants and cafes are empty, and shopping centres are mainly used to buy essential items, so supermarkets, greengrocers and butchers are fine but all of the other shops are virtually empty. Airlines have slashed flights and grounded fleets. Hotels are virtually empty. If this continues for the next 12 - 18 months, it will have massive ramifications. So, given that most of the effect of "C" is already being felt with "A", why not take things a step further and just shut things down for a month or two? Yes, things would be even worse for the hospitality and retail industries during that period but with government help (including payments to those who are out-of-work) it could be done - and the massive advantage is that it will be over sooner, with a definite end-date in sight. The problem with "A" is that no-one really knows when it will end.

Edited to add:

It looks as though the Vic and NSW governments are actually going ahead and adopting a version of "C" - schools and any "non-essential" businesses are closing with effect from Tuesday. Supermarkets, chemists, hospitals (obviously), convenience stores and petrol stations will remain open.

 

am55

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Essentially, it proposes three options:
- A, which is what Australia is doing now. This involves moderate measures, including people to work from home where possible, engage in social distancing, but keep schools open and not force any shutdowns. It is estimated that this situation will last 12-18 months.
- B, trace and track every single diagnosed infection and make those people self-isolate. Of course, A and B can be undertaken at the same time, if a country or area has the resources. The author considers that most of Australia is now beyond this, as we have too many infections.
- C, shut everything down for a period of time. This is, of course, essentially what China did in Wuhan and what appears to be happening in northern Italy. Shut everything non-essential - businesses, schools, factories and so on - for a period of perhaps 8 weeks. Keep some supermarkets open and, of course, keep hospitals open but, apart from that, shut everything down. This will starve the virus of opportunities to spread and should dramatically lower numbers.

Frankly, I think that C is the best option.
If people cooperate. In France, the lack of cooperation is leading the government to propose a 6 month jail term for repeat offenders of the confinement order (instead of 135 EUR fines if you don't have your Ausweis)... the whole thing is dredging up some old memories.
 

Osiris2012

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I feel like the measures in recent week(s) have been designed to ease us into the inevitable lockdown. We missed the opportunity when we didn't act as aggressively as the WHO suggested a few weeks back.

Not sure which is best, big hit to hip pockets and the economy for option C although the weekend scenes would seem to indicate Australians can't take these things seriously unless the Nanny brings her big stick to make sure you play by the rules.
 

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