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Australian Members - Part II - if you read the first post, you'll get what this is all about.

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Foxhound, Feb 10, 2016.

  1. Gerry Nelson

    Gerry Nelson Senior member

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    I've bought from him before and he's a great, friendly guy. I'd highly recommend him as a seller.
     
  2. LonerMatt

    LonerMatt Senior member

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    I think Pjs success has largely been marketing and communication. While I think the lighter-weight fabrics are a better choice, that's also a very considered part of his/their branding.

    Getting on the menswear train at the right time and expanding in the directions people have been interested in has made the biggest difference, IMO.
     
  3. md2010

    md2010 Senior member

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    Yes also the fact that he offers "Bespoke " , and the fact that himself is a "Savile Row" trained "Tailor ".
    Rumour has it that he can also topy on a pair of trousers crotch to prevent premature wear and he provide a service to shrink your tailored garments for a contemporary look !
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. fxh

    fxh Senior member

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    Wasn't my decision. But I can say that staying open till 6.30 pm - 7.00 pm didn't get a lot more people in. People tend to take an extended lunch hour or two or knock off about 4 pm or come in Saturday. The No 1 tram stops at front door and is only 10 mins from Flinders street.

    Thee will be a small stall at Camberwell Market on Sunday with some leftovers from sale.
     
  5. LonerMatt

    LonerMatt Senior member

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    Do you think that those words make much of a difference for prospective buyers, though?

    I don't, really, and I don't think it matters much, it's like saying something is printed in the darkroom when it's actually C-type printed, there's a group of people that see that as misleading but most people won't care as long as the result is what they feel is worth paying for, hence I doubt that 4 words have much of an impact. Could be wrong.
     
  6. apropos

    apropos Senior member

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    Re: PJT

    Choice of those 4 words aside, he has earned his success, built something significant from nothing, and the end product actually looks pretty good usually.

    He has also successfully incorporated some very attractive wimmenz into his firm/advertising.

    I do not begrudge him his success.
     
    4 people like this.
  7. Coxsackie

    Coxsackie Senior member

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    Agree with the above. OK so PJ himself is a shirtmaker. What exactly is a "tailor"? Is it the cutter? The stylist? The needle-and-thread person?

    I imagine there is a strict definition of the term. Anyway the business name uses "Tailors" in the plural. Good enough for me.
     
  8. The Ernesto

    The Ernesto Senior member

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    Someone who can measure up, make a pattern, cut, sew and fit.
     
    2 people like this.
  9. The Ernesto

    The Ernesto Senior member

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    Me neither. Good luck to the bloke.

    Saw him in the street in Melbourne a while ago and volunteered 'Love your clobber, Patrick'.

    He smiled and looked at me like I was an idiot. So he's pretty perceptive as well.
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2016
    2 people like this.
  10. AndrewRogers

    AndrewRogers Senior member

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    I understand the sentiment here but there are some distinctions that have been well and truly lost. There used to be a firm division between fitters and cutters, for example, with some expert at one task but hopeless at another. We are seeing a return of specialist fitters but really because of necessity (tailors who send garments back and forth to be made up along the way). Making, too, was often not done by the cutter but another team of specialists (pocket maker was once a job in itself). This model has changed and so our terms must, too, or at least let's not fix them prescriptively. I think we all know what these companies are getting at. I doubt anyone is being deceived and expecting one thing but receiving another. Whatever you call yourself, in a business in which you provide a considerable service along with the goods, it is the quality of that service and an effort to make the customer happy that counts and ought to be the focus of our attention. P Johnson is held out as providing that to a high degree. Dispute about that might be a real gripe and not an exercise in pedantry.

    PS Let's also not forget how culturally specific these terms are. Tailoring in Italy takes on a different model of manufacturing from, say, in the UK or even HK.
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2016
    3 people like this.
  11. Foxhound

    Foxhound Senior member

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    I used too, but now I couldn't care less what Patrick and Co want to call themselves. I do have a problem with them ignoring people's questions when it's raised.
     
  12. Osiris2012

    Osiris2012 Senior member

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    Proposed implementation of the low value gst importing isn't too bad.

    As long as its not a hassle to register will prob be fine for most eBay and smaller SF vendors. SuitSupply and similar purchases would prob be affected though.
     
  13. ryanohare

    ryanohare Senior member

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    I've given up on PJT & SS getting their trouser fit right. Their standard cut below the knee seems to be a vicious incision that doesn't permit anyone with a calf meatier than those of Taylor Swift to squeeze effectively into them without it looking like a crumpled mess. I've got 3 pairs of pants from them that all either required a return to let out some extra space, or just look too damn tight on me. Couple this with the fact their standard jacket cut is slightly roomier than the average jacket (I don't have a problem with that by the way) and to me you just end up with a mismatched cut.

    I wondered if this was just me, but I notice it on all their promotional images that they all wear too. This crumpling below the knee from what seems to be a cut that's just too bloody tight is really off-putting.
     
  14. Prince of Paisley

    Prince of Paisley Senior member

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    So same as a surgeon basically.
     
    2 people like this.
  15. The Ernesto

    The Ernesto Senior member

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    lol.

    I'd go bespoke with Coxie, no worries.
     
    1 person likes this.
  16. fxh

    fxh Senior member

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    This is sheer populism. Several reports over the years - Productivity Commission etc have shown that collecting GST on overseas purchases less than $1,000 will cost money. That is - it will cost more to collect the tax than the tax will bring in.

    The details aren't all that clear but it appears that O/S businesses with a turnover of less than $75,000 will not have to register. But businesses with a turnover above $75,000 will have to register AND collect taxes on behalf the Australian government and remit those taxes to the government.

    This imposes quite a a substantial burden on businesses in compliance and account /banking/book keeping costs. This will result in many businesses simply not registering for GST and thus refusing to sell to Australia. Only very large businesses or those with a large proportion of business from Australia will register. Medium size businesses will either not sell to Australia or introduce a special higher Australian buyers premium to cover compliance costs.

    BTW $75,000 isn't a particularly high turnover.

    In addition there will also be compliance costs here in Australia - in that Customs, ATO and Australia Post will be required to cooperate and coordinate as well as introduce surveillance/inspection procedures to insure GST is being paid, that the supplier is registered or that is under the $75,000 threshold.

    This will clearly add cost at the consumer end and long delays whilst goods are inspected.

    Courier companies will set up systems to facilitate this compliance - at a cost to the end consumer - you.

    Based on what goes on in UK and Canada - this is what you can expect:

    1. Many companies - mainly middle sized - refuse to sell to Australia
    2. Those that do sell to Australia will add an extra Australian Premium cost.
    3. Postal/customs will hold up parcels for up to a month or more to perform compliance duties
    4. Most business will transfer to courier companies who are experienced in this - Fedex etc - they will ensure compliance - for a cost.
    5. Expect an extra cost by courier of between $20 and $50 per parcel (even a $10 pack of shoe laces) for your goods and a delay of 2 weeks
    .
    Welcome to the lucky, innovative country in the digital age.
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2016
  17. Petepan

    Petepan Senior member

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    Nothing new folks, just the same 4 TFs if anyone is still interested:
    Tuscan Leather
    Amber Absolute
    Tobacco Vanille
    Noir de Noir
     
  18. Journeyman

    Journeyman Senior member

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    Absolutely. It's old-fashioned protectionism dressed up for the digital age.
     
  19. Geoffrey Firmin

    Geoffrey Firmin Senior member

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    FTSFAJ I buy nearly all my books online due to the fact that it takes three months or more on average for them to be released here then marked up at double the price. FUBAR

    Thank you very much Malcolm and Gerry.
     
  20. fxh

    fxh Senior member

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    Melbourne
    I think the books from Amazon/book depository are one thing that will be ok - it will just add GST. Amazon is big enough to register and mark clearly on outside so that AusPost and Customs will give it an auto pass and only hold it up a few days
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2016

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