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Australian Members - Part II - if you read the first post, you'll get what this is all about.

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Foxhound, Feb 10, 2016.

  1. lachyzee

    lachyzee Senior member

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    Last edited: Sep 15, 2016
  2. eightace

    eightace Senior member

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    I've had mixed results there.
     
  3. corey.m

    corey.m Well-Known Member

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    Hi,

    I have an M.J. Bale Samurai Suit in grey blue glen plaid size 42/36 for sale. Made in Japan by Ring Jacket with full canvas construction. Literally worn once a year ago. Has sat in my wardrobe since. Was listed as a drop 7, but feels a little closer to a drop 8.

    Getting married next month - Originally $1300, pickup or drop off in the Sydney CBD for $650.

    Also have a pair of Crocket and Jones Westfield's in dark brown calf size 10F for sale. Like new with some shop scuffs on the sole.

    Originally $650, pickup or drop off in the Sydney CBD for $325.

    If you come and pick them both up from my joint - $900.

    Cheers.

    [​IMG]
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  4. Petepan

    Petepan Senior member

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    It appears that you might be having issues with certain aspects of marketing, not marketing per se.

    After all, getting word out to the public that a product/service exists, is also part of marketing. Surely the knowledge that something you desire actually exists adds value to you, rather than detract from it?

    I get the gist of what you are saying though. But I reckon you might have cast the net too far on your first go. That's no biggie.
     
  5. LonerMatt

    LonerMatt Senior member

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  6. fxh

    fxh Senior member

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  7. Coxsackie

    Coxsackie Senior member

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  8. Prince of Paisley

    Prince of Paisley Senior member

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  9. fxh

    fxh Senior member

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    Charles Tyrwhitt pays $10,800 ACCC fine for misleading pricing on shirts Lucy Cormack THE AGE

    When a store compares a "was" price to a "now" price, it can be the difference between a shopper purchasing something and not. The only problem is, what if the product was never actually purchased for the original price?

    The practice is known as two-price comparison advertising, and this week it left a London-based clothing manufacturer and retailer paying a penalty of more than $10,000.
    [​IMG]
    The Charles Tyrwhitt shirt which was advertised at once being $160 despite no consumer ever having paid that price.

    Charles Tyrwhitt LLP sells men's and women's shirts, business clothing and accessories which are advertised extensively online and in printed catalogue inserts in Australian newspapers and magazines. The brand, which spruiks "exemplary customer service, with smashing prices and a pinch of British charm thrown in for good measure," is known for its deal-based offers, like its set of four shirts for $199. But following an investigation by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission, the retailer was issued a $10,800 penalty and an infringement notice for contravening the Australian Consumer Law with its "was/now" pricing practices in the sale of at least 737 business shirts.

    The ACCC found Charles Tyrwhitt had made a false or misleading representation in relation to the "was" price of a men's "slim fit non-iron micro-spot white" shirt on its website, between February 2016 and March 2016.

    Charles Tyrwhitt LLP sells men's and women's shirts, business clothing and accessories which are advertised extensively online and in catalogue inserts.
    [​IMG]

    The shirt was advertised with a "was" price of $160 and a "now" price of $69, however the "was" price had only been advertised for a short period in a section of the Charles Tyrwhitt website which was difficult to locate, and no consumer had ever purchased the shirt at that price.

    The ACCC determined that the pricing falsely represented to consumers that by purchasing the shirt there would be a saving, when that was not the case.

    [​IMG]
    .
    The retailer is popular for its multi-shirt deals.
    "Was/now price representations are likely to be misleading if the products have not been sold at the 'was' price for a reasonable period immediately before the sale or 'now' price is offered," said ACCC Commissioner Sarah Court. "Comparative advertising can be a powerful marketing tool but it is essential that retailers ensure that any advertised savings are real, truthful and accurate." Ms Court said the enforcement action against Charles Tyrwhitt served as a reminder to overseas businesses that supplying products to Australian consumers required that they comply with Australian regulations.

    Australian consumer law states that businesses that use two-price comparison advertising, like "was/now" prices, "strike through" or indicating a particular dollar amount or percentage saving, must ensure consumers are not misled about the potential savings.

    Charles Tyrwhitt did not respond to a request for comment.
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2016
  10. sliq

    sliq Senior member

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    serves them right. they're also pretty annoying with their marketing too - constant hardcopy junk mail
     
  11. fxh

    fxh Senior member

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    THE AGE


    Experience within retail trend analysis companies has earned Louise Edmonds cred in the luxury menswear sector. The founder of MenStylePower.com utilises her passion and understanding of fashion to deliver a fresh, edgy take on men's style.

    Read more: http://www.executivestyle.com.au/we...wear-when-youre-off-duty-gri1z1#ixzz4KaNFsnnq

    If anyone has shared my men's style journey, MenStylePower turned 7 in August. I have officially called it, my 7 year old son. The sweat and tears that have been shed - not to mention thousands of dollars invested to maintain being an authority in the men's style arena, I almost felt like I should have thrown it away last week. Through the frustration of the absent returning reward for all of the energy, late nights, sacrifices you make wasn't adding up. Until the last 30 days where this article for Brands Exclusive, my story with CEO magazine, my freelance employment with Executive Style, vlogging for AskMen and yesterday an editorial shoot for David Jones as the head stylist and project manager came to light. Many of us often question what path we should be on. My purpose is a deep, complex and contradicting agenda that only few will understand but it includes lifting the spirit and confidence of men for the better of all. This article will explain some of it.


    Louise Edmonds, the founder and style director of men's lifestyle portal MenStylePower, believes one of the strongest statements a man can make is with his sense of style.

    "It's incredibly important to align your talents, skill set, position and personal brand with your attire," Edmonds says.

    "Within a 20-second time frame you are judged on the way you look and how confident you are in what you're wearing.

    "I've always called the boardroom the modern-day battlefield, and knowing what armour and ammunition you bring in is vital."
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2016
  12. LonerMatt

    LonerMatt Senior member

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  13. crdb

    crdb Senior member

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    The article makes a common "mistake" (from my world view) of assuming that "self" is independent of one's actions and will. But self is defined by one's actions. Your socio-economic status, background, life experience, your friends, your work, your accent are all parts of who you are. Clothing is but one of the various ways to communicate it. If you do great things, you are a great person. If you commit a crime, you are a criminal, even if you say "that's not me, that's not who I really am, that was just a one off". If you feel a particular affinity to the social group that likes Southern Trad, then that is part of your identity as well. YOU choose to spend time educating yourself about various trends in clothing, and then expressing yourself within the constraints of that "artform" - the choice of context is a personal choice for which responsibility should be taken, not absolved or blamed on "circumstances". It is not a negation of self but an affirmation of individualism. It is a source of happiness and pride, not anxiety, even if others perceive it that way (just as you think a Rolex is a waste of money and many posters feel pride and joy every time they put theirs on).

    I haven't replied to your reply in our earlier discussion (whether art is propaganda or free of message), although I wanted to. So I'll dump some quick thoughts here and blend it back onto this subject.

    I still stick to my guns: all art has a message, all authors are trying to convince you of something. Now what that something is might have been paid for by someone else (Bach, Haydn, Da Vinci) or it could be the author's own opinions and world view (Kerouac). Some authors take something and use it in a different context to give it a different meaning, thus creating new propaganda for their ideas and observations (e.g. in Senso: Bruckner's 7th is basically the entire soundtrack; Bruckner was a deeply religious man whose music can be considered inspired by religion and the sacred; yet the context in which it is used in Senso is such that the emotions are "reused" for a romance that is "bad" from a religious point of view: betraying her husband and her country). I struggled a lot with this as a young composer, because I wanted to believe in art qua art, yet my best works came about as a result of constraints and conformity and a patron: for example the music for a theatre play, in other words, implementing someone else's message and adding a little bit of mine with it.

    Art is fundamentally manipulation: it attempts to hijack and direct your emotions to achieve a particular goal. If you look at the mechanics of manipulation - be it ad hominem, red herrings, appeal to moderation, fallacy of composition - they all rely on departing from logic and using some form of appeal to emotion to cover it up and lead you to accept a conclusion you might have rejected. Another argument might be that communication between humans is naturally high bandwidth and even with the bandwidth afforded by commonly understood context and the fuzzy logic of the language itself, emotions are a necessary path to communicating higher order things that would be otherwise impossible to "word". For example: if I make a mental picture of a wife telling her husband "can you be more considerate?" every married man out there understands and is laughing right now, there is a common ground here, a lesson that experience teaches you about EQ, first with instinct and only much later with logic as you have gained the necessary experience.

    And so we get to fashion as emotional manipulation (using the physical world, this time, instead of fallacies) to achieve a goal. What you put in the morning sets out to achieve a series of goals: it might be to obtain attention and consideration from others ("your dress is so nice, it makes me happy just to look at it"), it might be to signify your social status, which is not linear: putting on a suit for clients is telling clients you have a professional kind of personality; shining your shoes that you are detail oriented; being on time that you are reliable. The suited man does this because he is professional, detail oriented and reliable - these traits are part of his personality and thus his "conformist" dress counts as self expression.

    This very post is also attempting to convince you of something, it is thus also propaganda, caveat emptor.
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2016
    4 people like this.
  14. Prince of Paisley

    Prince of Paisley Senior member

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    Please provide proper footnotes and bibliography or we will have to mark you down.
     
    1 person likes this.
  15. crdb

    crdb Senior member

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    Buckley's chance of that happening.

    (is that expression still used?)
     
  16. fxh

    fxh Senior member

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    Matt, just to be clear I think the Louise Edmunds stuff is a joke. Slightly rewritten PR/shilling/ advertising copy dosed with feel good positive inanities. It's about as informed as getting menswear advice from a rural hens night planner.

    There's plenty to discuss about clothes and meaning. Just not in the pages of Executive Style.
     
  17. akclothpooper

    akclothpooper Senior member

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    Seems like how to dress to show I have lots of disposable income from a skim.
     
  18. md2010

    md2010 Senior member

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    I believe you need to follow your passion, do what makes you happy. As long as you are not harming others. The key is to work hard and keep priorities in order. I think (common )people makes mistakes distinguishing between passion and materialism. They are two completely different prospective.
    On the Rolex- mrs didn't like the sub.So decided on new Explorer . It's now with longer minute hand and chroma lights on dial(including 3/6/9).
     
  19. Journeyman

    Journeyman Senior member

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    I think that it's a joke, too - just not a deliberate one on the part of Ms Edmunds.


    I can't help by think that there are a few contradictions in that article that Gracia could have done more to tease out (if she realised them, that is).

    I think that the idea that what we wear is an expression of ourself is true, but I also suspect that, for most people, it's strongly influenced by marketing departments.

    After all, *why* do we dress the way we do? As Gracia says, often-times the way we dress is constrained by various factors - the job we do, the socio-economic milieu in which we live and a range of other influences. However, even taking those factors into account, most adults still have a fairly wide range of options when it comes to dress, particularly in a country like Australia. That being the case, the way that we choose is to dress, then, is because we which to be perceived in a particular way. The very fact that we wish to be perceived in a particular way is an expression of ourself. Do we want to be thought of as successful? Cool? Alternative? Into hip-hop? Into haute couture/upmarket brands (which can feed back into being "cool" or "successful")?

    The way that we dress is, I would argue, often a strong expression of ourselves but it is not at all pure - it is filtered through a whole range of factors and influences, many of which we don't even think of when we are deciding how to dress.
     
  20. Geoffrey Firmin

    Geoffrey Firmin Senior member

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    Interesting series of posts that I feel deserves a well reasoned response. First off Art while it has been used as a propaganda tool is not essentially out to make you feel anything in particular. Both Stalin and Hitler sought to incubate a specific state sponsored art exemplifying the ideals of their dictatorship. Hitler failed, Stalin to a degree, through intimidation and threats to life succeeded in forcing artists to bend to his will and produce state specific art. As visual propoganda Soviet realism worked in promoting a specific lie as art forget it.

    Art if it's real will provoke a response in the viewer, listener dependant upon a number of factors. Education, experience, ability to think in terms of sensation and feeling, openness to new ideas experience. Textural response eg books is a different discursive and cognitive response.

    Individually is a complex process of formation dependant upon milieu, social & cultural history, myths(Barthes) experience, beliefs, practice I could go on about the complexity of the human condition but I won't.

    I agree with JM I think we do dress for the occasion as we seek to, comply isn't the right word but as we are social animals we seek to belong. Clothing makes a statement about who and what we are and how we perceive both ourself and our place in the world and enables us to navigate particular social customs which align to our role, function in said society. Sadly their is nothing pure about it. Every action displays intent either consciously or unconsciously.

    As for fashion that's a game for children. Style and panache is where it's at in my discursive dictionary.
     

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