1. And... we're back. You'll notice that all of your images are back as well, as are our beloved emoticons, including the infamous :foo: We have also worked with our server folks and developers to fix the issues that were slowing down the site.

    There is still work to be done - the images in existing sigs are not yet linked, for example, and we are working on a way to get the images to load faster - which will improve the performance of the site, especially on the pages with a ton of images, and we will continue to work diligently on that and keep you updated.

    Cheers,

    Fok on behalf of the entire Styleforum team
    Dismiss Notice

Australian Members - Part II - if you read the first post, you'll get what this is all about.

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Foxhound, Feb 10, 2016.

  1. crappbag

    crappbag Senior member

    Messages:
    149
    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2013
    

    He's definitely still up and running. I have a commission from him due soon.

    He does have a bit of wait list atm though.
     
  2. crdb

    crdb Senior member

    Messages:
    712
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2014
    I'm not Australian, although married to one and lived there only for a short while (although returning frequently). I am European, grew up in the UK and I pretty much agree with Bruce Boyer's explanation. I'm going to misquote him a bit but I read his book as a paper copy which I don't have at hand anymore.

    Brits like to have a continuity of colour from trouser to shoe. So they choose darker shoes to go with their darker suit trousers. Usually that means black, but that's more or less the source of "no brown in town" and the (increasingly rarer) looks you'd get if you went to work in London wearing light brown shoes. However, it's worth noting that Foster & sons, one of if not the oldest bespoke shoemaker in London and definitely one of the most conservative, is known for a sort of brown-black antiquing which is clearly "not black", so I prefer Boyer's match-the-darkness explanation.

    Italians (especially) and many other Europeans like a contrast from trouser leg to shoe. It's flashier. So you see more brown shoes, tan, suede, etc.

    Americans are in between, some falling in the British camp and others in the Italian camp. I've found the East Coast more British in taste.

    Australia has a very British sartorial culture, at least from my experience, and many Australians particularly in the financial industry spent some years working in London and brought back the habit. You'll occasionally see flashes of colours that'd be out of place in London. So, black shoes.

    I think there's a third dimension and that is quality. If you decide to go to work in burgundy antiqued Scafora bespoke shoes, I doubt people will mind so much. Formality, and business-appropriateness is also a function of how nice your clothes are, and in today's world of greying pointy and square ended rubber soled slip ons (nevertheless the correct black) a bespoke Goodyear-welted shoe will look fantastic. This is doubly true if you are not client facing.

    On the other hand if you are starting your big corp career, you do not want to stand out too much. I doubt people would tell you off for wearing the wrong coloured shoe (I doubt many back office guys care or give it more than a second's thought) but dressing too well might create a bit of distance.
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. shellshoe

    shellshoe Member

    Messages:
    18
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2012
    Thanks

    What was your mode of contact with him? Does he reply to email at all? Would you know how long before one could get a fitting with him?
     
  4. Oli2012

    Oli2012 Senior member

    Messages:
    2,267
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2012
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    I only like black and brown shoes. Burgundy doesn't take well to calf and cordovan looks plasticy.
     
  5. Geoffrey Firmin

    Geoffrey Firmin Senior member

    Messages:
    4,995
    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2010
    Location:
    South West of the Black Stump
    

    For the defence I believe Burgundy shoes with navy suit or trousers/grey POW jacket white shirt and burgundy paisley tie are fine in my humble POV have worn this in the past and not raised eyebrows. However I am speaking from a cultural creative perspective. In the government business circles I have been mixing the past few years ( a Murder of Crows) its been black trousers black suits and black shoes. Put me off wearing black it has.
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2016
  6. Henry Carter

    Henry Carter Senior member Affiliate Vendor

    Messages:
    4,438
    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2009
    Location:
    On the Monaro, NSW.
    
    Hi mate please send me a pm with your details and I'll see if I can get you in touch with him. He is a stockist of mine but has always been a part time operation in between his full time job and has a young family. Still, hopefully I can get you guys in touch.
     
  7. crappbag

    crappbag Senior member

    Messages:
    149
    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2013
    I think you can make bookings through this link - http://www.hermanbros.com.au/bookings

    I believe I had to wait 2 months for my last fitting (he only sees people on weekends).
     
  8. clayb

    clayb Member

    Messages:
    19
    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2016
    This is exactly what I'm afraid. I'm going to order the Herring Knightsbridge Oxford Black instead of the Loake Strand Burgundy then.
     
  9. Highlands

    Highlands Member

    Messages:
    20
    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2016
    

    Calf does mighty fine in burgundy:

    [​IMG]
     
    1 person likes this.
  10. Highlands

    Highlands Member

    Messages:
    20
    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2016
    

    Burgundy is fine in Australia, we are not in London, and I doubt you are attending court or formal events.. Most men wear black square-toed blobs, or pointy-toed gondolas, or RM Williams (unsuitable for wear with suits imo).

    If your burgundy shoes are well-polished and maintained, then wear them in good health and enjoy! People will notice the condition and quality of your shoes before the colour (unless the colour is something too out there like pink or yellow).
     
  11. Coxsackie

    Coxsackie Senior member

    Messages:
    3,964
    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2013
    Location:
    Melbourne - Sydney - Shanghai
    Nonsense - I think a well-aged Clos Vougeot is the perfect match for a veal casserole.
     
    6 people like this.
  12. Geoffrey Firmin

    Geoffrey Firmin Senior member

    Messages:
    4,995
    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2010
    Location:
    South West of the Black Stump
    RN had an interesting speaker on Blueprint for Living this AM. Christopher Breward has written The Suit:Form, Function and Style you can listen to it or download it here http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/blueprintforliving/the-history-of-the-suit/7520514

    The book is published by Reaktion Books a very interesting Cultural Theory Art publisher and while their books are written by academics they are quite accessible. I've quite a few of their books in my library.
     
  13. md2010

    md2010 Senior member

    Messages:
    1,894
    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2011
    Location:
    Sydney
    Happy voting everyone!
     
    1 person likes this.
  14. Osiris2012

    Osiris2012 Senior member

    Messages:
    1,747
    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2012
    Location:
    Brisbane
    Burgundy with navy/grey is awesome, push posh to this back shoe conformity
     
  15. Journeyman

    Journeyman Senior member

    Messages:
    6,774
    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2005
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    Absolutely - although I suspect that you mean "pish posh"!

    I do have one friend who works for a large, old law firm who was told by an elderly partner that one should never, ever wear brown shoes with a suit. Thankfully, my friend was wearing black shoes at the time.

    Apart from that, though, I really think that 99% of places would be fine with you wearing dark brown or burgundy shoes to work.

    If you turn up wearing mid-to-light brown double monks and an RAF blue suit, then you may well attract some disapproving looks, but if you're wearing a navy or charcoal suit with chocolate brown or burgundy captoe balmorals, you'd generally be fine.
     
  16. Geoffrey Firmin

    Geoffrey Firmin Senior member

    Messages:
    4,995
    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2010
    Location:
    South West of the Black Stump
    

    Think thats debatable JM in Sydney in January that look was everywhere mostly sans tie I think it was the 'IT' business look for the Sydney Summer. I spent a month there and I was spotting that look at leas half a dozen times daily.
     
  17. California Dreamer

    California Dreamer Senior member

    Messages:
    5,540
    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2006
    Location:
    Melbourne
    Size 8 Melbourne members might do well to get down to Vinnies Malvern tomorrow. These are not dirt cheap, between $35-$55 but still pretty good value for what they are.

    L-R: Prada driving shoes, Artolini Star black suede monkstrap, Tod's navy suede chukka, Louis Vuitton driving shoe.

    [​IMG]
     
    1 person likes this.
  18. clayb

    clayb Member

    Messages:
    19
    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2016
    Thanks guys for your comments.

    I understand that burgundy with navy/grey is awesome, that's why I love the colour in the first place. However I'm still not quite sure about "99% of places would be fine with you wearing dark brown or burgundy shoes to work" when you may be one the only few wearing non-black shoes on the whole floor.

    As you probably know, most of my colleagues and even managers (mix of IT and BAs, back office, big corp) rock to work in mediocre black oxford or derby and I would find it hard for them to not pay (too much?) attention to my shoes, especially when they are "well-polished and maintained". I'm still fairly new to the company and don't want to send the wrong message.

    It's kind of funny that after discovering that I've been wearing shitty shoes for a long time, I've spent the last few weeks browsing SF and AAAC to learn about quality dress shoes, trying to find the best and most suitable shoes for my style, only to realise that Australia is not the same as the US and EU when it comes to styles (you can see black everywhere in Melbourne, and it's not just shoes.) While I like the idea of well dressed, I definitely don't want to create the impression that I'm trying too hard to be different or something.

    Maybe I should play it safe and wait until I've been at the place for a while, and hopefully by that time things have changed a bit towards the non-British side, to consider the burgundy again?

    Also speaking of dark brown and dark burgundy, anyone thinks the Herring Richmond brogue in brown and the Loake Strand in Burgundy are not dark enough for work? The colour of the Strand is from the review of wurger who is also an Aussie AFAIK and somehow it looks like a medium burgundy to me.
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2016
  19. Coxsackie

    Coxsackie Senior member

    Messages:
    3,964
    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2013
    Location:
    Melbourne - Sydney - Shanghai
    Get some runs on the board. Make yourself indispensable. Then wear whatever you fucking well like.
     
    2 people like this.
  20. Osiris2012

    Osiris2012 Senior member

    Messages:
    1,747
    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2012
    Location:
    Brisbane
    Spot on coxie.

    I also wonder if these classic rules even exist anymore in 99% of workplaces. Casual business seems to be the orthodoxy these days and if you wear a suit (following rules or not) at in at least 3 of the big 4 banks expect to cop smartass comments.
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by