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Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Nick V., Jul 28, 2017.

  1. standaloneprotein

    standaloneprotein Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]

    The extra leather "layer" on the heel area. Thanks
     

  2. Nick V.

    Nick V. Distinguished Member Dubiously Honored

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    People often connote the word stretching for forcing. Yes, if you force the upper you can do damage not only to the stitching but to the inseam and you can also create stretch marks on the upper.
    The correct way to "stretch" a shoe is NOT to force it but to "ease" it. That's a slow process where you treat the leather with a fluid that makes the leather more pliable. The stretcher is inserted into the shoe while its wet. Pressure should be applied until the upper leather is taut. Leave it overnight. The next day wet the shoe again and give it a half of a turn and let dry again. Try the shoe on and see how it fits. If it's still tight repeat the process. Professional stretchers are made with ratchet type devices rather than a threaded screw like the ones sold on Amazon. They are in the 100's of dollars but offer much more control than the ones sold "over the counter". Customers often ask can we stretch a shoe 1 size, 1/2 size? The honest answer is that cannot be predicted. It will only stretch as much as the leather will allow without causing damage and that's a case-by-case issue determined by a professional.
     

  3. Nick V.

    Nick V. Distinguished Member Dubiously Honored

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    It's for style and support. FYI.....the counters in boots are generally longer than the counters in shoes.
     

  4. Darell John

    Darell John Active Member

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    Thanks Nick, Going out of your way to actually measure them for me.. That’s much appreciated! spoke to my shoe guy as well and he says he ends up trimming it anyway for the thin half leather or rubber danite ones, so I would be fine just to get a larger sized one, the one I showed in the pic is for my danite soled boot so I don’t think there should be much issues in terms of height.

    Thanks much for the advice.

    Have a great day!
     

  5. Nick V.

    Nick V. Distinguished Member Dubiously Honored

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    Pleasure to help. However, just to clarify, any time a heel is replaced on a men's -or- women's shoe it needs to be trimmed, sometimes sanded, inked and, finished on the brush machine. What I meant was on the Dainite heels if the heel selected is to large the nail holes won't fit the base properly. You would need a size that is only slightly larger than the the base. And, you are correct if you are replacing a Dainite heel with a new Dainite, balance will not be an issue.
     

  6. Shoenut

    Shoenut Distinguished Member

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    Does anyone try to match conditioners to types of leather? I have a myriad of conditioner types. I use Lexol on dark oil tanned leather, Bick 4 on lighter colored leathers, VSC on shell Cordavan. Pecard leather dressing on old dried out leather. Interesting enough, the people who told me stay away from mink oil are the same ones that swear by Renovatuer. A mink oil based product. Can I trim this down to just one product? It is very difficult to get ingredients but I understand that the usual culprits are lanolin, Neetsfoot oil, mink oil, tallow, beeswax, and various vegetable oils. Does the type of tannage díctate type of conditioner?
     

  7. Nick V.

    Nick V. Distinguished Member Dubiously Honored

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    Personally, I'm a firm believer in keeping it simple. I can't tell you how often footwear comes in damaged from customers abusing products and overkill procedures they read about online. The shoe care thread is renown for that. There is some good advise on that thread but a lot of it is way to complicated, unnecessary and, a waste of time and money.

    In 4+ decades of being in the industry I've seen a lot of products come and go. I stick to the ones that are proven over time and are consistently effective and safe to use. Leather is leather it's not perfect. Trying to get it perfect often results in avoidable damage. In many cases it's a risk vs reward issue. In those cases I prefer to play it safe. The products I use with the most confidence are Lexol Conditioner, Saphir Universal Cream, VSC, and Reno. I use more Universal Cream than Lexol and I use more Reno than VSC.

    Regarding your comment about mink oil in Reno, that's different than straight mink oil paste. Mink oil itself is extremely greasy. Once you apply it, it's nearly impossible to remove. Because of it's greasy nature it acts as a magnet attracting dirt and grime. For those reasons I NEVER recommend it for dress footwear. It has it's positive attributes and uses though. Where cosmetics is of little concern IE hiking boots, snow boots, field and stream footwear, etc. mink oil is a very effective waterproof. Using it for those types of applications will help protect your footwear from extreme conditions.

    The mink oil in Reno may be a base but Reno is saturated with other ingredients rendering the amount of mink oil in it not nearly as greasy as straight mink oil.
     

  8. Shoenut

    Shoenut Distinguished Member

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    Thanks Nick,
    Looks like I am not as complicated as I thought.
     

  9. OldState

    OldState Member

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    When I was younger and very into backpacking I had a pair of very heavy weight Merrell Wilderness boots (the old Italian version) I was told by a couple people never to use mink oil as it weakens and breaks down the leather. I didn’t listen an used it anyway as I liked how it softened and waterproofed the boots.
    Well the boots eventually broke down and had substantially reduced form. Then soles fell off.
    Every time I see mink oil recommended for dress shoes I cringe. Even if it’s in a small amount couldn’t still break down the integrity of the shoe?
     

  10. Nick V.

    Nick V. Distinguished Member Dubiously Honored

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    As I mentioned.....I don't recommend mink oil on dress shoes. However it's a great product for footwear that will be exposed to harsh weather conditions. Like anything else it needs to be used properly (as directed).
    I've seen footwear that was abused with mink oil. It was applied so thick that the mink oil was flaking off. Almost looked like the boots were dipped in wax. I'm not saying that, that is what you did. I have no idea...
    I've also seen soles fall off of shoes that were never treated with mink oil. As synthetic soles age they tend to dry out some begin to disintegrate. That's just the nature of some synthetics esp. the older ones. It may not have had anything to do with mink oil.
     

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