1. And... we're back. You'll notice that all of your images are back as well, as are our beloved emoticons, including the infamous :foo: We have also worked with our server folks and developers to fix the issues that were slowing down the site.

    There is still work to be done - the images in existing sigs are not yet linked, for example, and we are working on a way to get the images to load faster - which will improve the performance of the site, especially on the pages with a ton of images, and we will continue to work diligently on that and keep you updated.

    Cheers,

    Fok on behalf of the entire Styleforum team
    Dismiss Notice

Ask A Question, Get An Answer... - Post All Quick Questions Here (Classic menswear)

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Master-Classter, Sep 28, 2008.

  1. mco543

    mco543 Senior member

    Messages:
    188
    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2009
    I just thrifted a really nice bepsoke suit and when I got home I noticed inside the pockets and along the hem it has a label that says "TERVIRA WOOL ENGLAND"

    Now I looked it up and it kept giving me "TREVIRA" and it says it's a form of polyester, it's entirely possible it was spelled wrong on all the labels however it baffles me that someone would get a very nicely tailored bespoke suit with smoked MOP buttons made using a polyester fabric.

    What the hell do I have?
     
  2. Aeren

    Aeren Active Member

    Messages:
    26
    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2013
    hi guys,there is crease on my shirt between 1st and 2nd button(below collar),it become more Obvious when i put my jacket on,can i fix it by my own?
     
  3. 12345Michael54321

    12345Michael54321 Senior member

    Messages:
    1,555
    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2008
    Location:
    Baltimore County, Maryland, USA
    
    Without seeing exactly what it is about which you're asking, it's difficult to suggest a course of action. Might this simply be a crease you could iron out? If not, please provide a photo.
     
  4. Aeren

    Aeren Active Member

    Messages:
    26
    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2013
    

    hi,thank you for your reply. cant upload any photo currently,but im pretty sure it cant be iron out.
    or,should i say its a "pulling" vertical line?
     
  5. breadan

    breadan Member

    Messages:
    14
    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2013
    Isn't Yom Kippur supposed to be pretty conservative? So a green blazer would really make you stick out.
     
  6. breadan

    breadan Member

    Messages:
    14
    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2013
    Also i really belive the manufactures recommend waiting to cover themselves in case the shoetrees are not made of unfinished wood
    If you put a plastic or varnished tree in a damp shoe it could be harmful . I think most people myself included agree unfinished cedar or birch trees put in immediatly is the best practice
     
  7. johnlocke

    johnlocke Member

    Messages:
    8
    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2013
    I'm buying a new suit and am trying to decide on a charcoal herringbone fabric. I work in a very casual industry (tech) and rarely if ever have to dress up (and when I do, no one has the sense or style to notice what I'm wearing). So this would basically take the place of my solid charcoal suit for weddings, fancy parties, interviews, etc.

    I want it to be versatile and all-season, but still a little fun and interesting, hence the herringbone. I think I've got it narrowed down to three fabrics; I'm leaning toward 2 or 3, since they're both a bit less noticeable/wintery than 1 and would hopefully not appear stripey from a distance (not a fan of shadow stripes). Any preferences?

    Also, does the weight matter a ton? They're all between 260 and 280g (not sure of the Super count -- probably between 110 and 130?), which would work all year round, right?


    (1) http://www.kentwang.com/grey-herringbone-2.html
    (2) http://www.kentwang.com/suits/charcoal-herringbone-3.html
    (3) http://www.kentwang.com/suits/charcoal-herringbone.html
     
  8. mimo

    mimo Senior member

    Messages:
    7,382
    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2012
    If the concept of an "all year round suit" works at all, then I guess it would be about that weight. But that's really saying it doesn't get hot or cold, or at least that you don't care as long as your car/office AC/heating works well. I'd go for around 220g myself, but I tend to be warm rather than cold. Ironically, you might find it's worse in winter when offices are heated - my experience anyway. Or more than one suit! As for the "super" rating, it's notoriously unreliable as a quality guide, but in the range you mention should be decent enough AND reasonably resilient. I am told Kent Wang sells nice stuff, anyway.

    I like herringbone. But it wouldn't be my choice if I only ever wore one suit. It's not entirely "businessy", while at the same time, charcoal isn't exactly fun. It's a little....tenth grade history teacher. My recommendation for the "one" suit, would always be solid navy. Total business with a double cuff shirt, tie and black captoes. City cool casual with brown shoes and belt, linen shirt and no tie. Totally appropriate for everything from a lunchtime date to a state funeral.

    Still, it's not my suit and if a charcoal herringbone is the one you love, no problem. I'd wear it, and enjoy it, but it will need livening up with - I suggest - a pale blue shirt, a good tie (small pattern, high quality, strong colour but not bright e.g. burgundy), and white or contrasting pocket square. And wear good shoes. Probably black, and I'd suggest maybe some kind of wingtip brogue would set it off perfectly as a "not-quite-city" look. Don't forget good socks either. Check out the "rock your socks" thread for inspiration.
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2013
  9. aravenel

    aravenel Senior member

    Messages:
    5,624
    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    
    I think you'd get much more use out of a solid charcoal or navy suit than a herringbone. If you want something "fun and interesting" (which is almost always a bad idea with suits), change your shirt or tie. Herringbone rarely looks good outside of tweed or overcoating IMO, and it's more distinctive, so every time you wear it it will look like you only own the one suit. Go for the most versatile thing you can for early suits, which is solid charcoal or navy. If you really want herringbone, get 2 or 3 as they are much finer and will resolve to closer to solid at distance.
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2013
  10. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    33,333
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    I think herringbone is a fine choice. I wouldn't call it wacky or anything, but if you only have 1-3 suits not a good idea.
     
  11. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Senior member

    Messages:
    2,998
    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2008
    It is my opinion that the herringbone fabrics given as examples above wear as solids, especially numbers 2 and 3. In either business or social settings, nobody else will ever notice the herringbone, much less dock you on style points because of it.

    As for navy over charcoal. Either is equally appropriate. There is a StyleForum dogma that solid navy is at the top of the heap but I don't buy it. I prefer dark gray over navy for a simple practical reason, gray doesn't show every little piece of lint which is floating around in the world and navy does.
     
  12. Parterre

    Parterre Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    98
    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2012
    Rather basic question. What, exactly, are the hallmarks that distinguish Italian style from English style? If, say, I was going for a plain navy suit, what would distinguish a Rubinacci or a Brioni from a Huntsman or Kilgour (not that I could afford those).

    Also, what is the French style? I've never really seen French suitmakers on here.
     
  13. aravenel

    aravenel Senior member

    Messages:
    5,624
    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    


    Perhaps I shouldn't say they look weird, but I do not think they are tasteful as such--again, outside of big, shaggy herringbones you'd see in tweed or overcoating.

    I 100% think he shouldn't buy herringbone for his first/only suit. If he's really dead set on it, go for 2 or 3 as they are pretty close to solid, but I still think solid is a much better option.
     
  14. johnlocke

    johnlocke Member

    Messages:
    8
    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2013

    I already have a solid navy (well, pretty solid -- bird's-eye) suit, so this wouldn't be my first or only. I also wear suits maybe 6 times a year max, so this may not necessarily be a situation where I'm going to get the evil eye for wearing the same thing over and over again. (Maybe if I was going to only StyleForum conventions, but in the real world, it seems to me that most people -- even at white-shoe firms these days -- don't know or don't care about the differences in fabrics or suits.) I work at a big tech company where people wear pajama bottoms and clogs to work (and this is in NYC), and my friends are video-game and beer-pong types, so the bar is pretty low here.

    Anyway, I was really looking for a solid charcoal suit that had some texture close up -- to mix it up a little -- and the herringbones seemed like the most interesting choices, especially considering I already have a bird's-eye. I was already leaning toward 2 or 3 but couldn't decide between them.

    On a related topic, is there any situation where a small pattern would be acceptable as your core "solid" navy or charcoal suit?
     
  15. sanchito

    sanchito Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    57
    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2013
    I'm really digging this RLBL SC...it's labelled Denim and I can pick it up for under $350...but I'm thinking I'll be stuck wearing it with jeans only...I usually do a 33 inch length but this is 31 inches....still enough to mostly cover my butt but it makes it more casual I think...not sure if this will work with Chinos? Thanks!

    [​IMG]
     
  16. othertravel

    othertravel Senior member

    Messages:
    5,433
    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2011
    It will definitely work with chinos. Go to the RL website for some ideas.
     
    1 person likes this.
  17. sanchito

    sanchito Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    57
    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2013
    Awesome...thanks...and a general thank you to everyone that has helped me build my wardrobe over the past month or so...
     
  18. aravenel

    aravenel Senior member

    Messages:
    5,624
    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    

    Well, the bar is quite low, but that doesn't mean yours should be as well :)

    I'm with you on texture. Ideally, you'd do flannel for the winter and something like fresco or linen for the summer, but you need one suit, so I'd stick with a basic worsted. If you really want the herringbone, go for it--it's your call at the end of the day, and you need to be happy with it. I just feel herringbone isn't as much of a staple as a solid. If you have a suit that fits (which I'd assume you would given the reviews that Kent Wang gets around here) then you'll already look great and be far ahead of the curve--and now you have a suit that can be used for everything from a night on the town to an interview to a funeral--just change up the shirt, shoes, and tie.
     
  19. johnlocke

    johnlocke Member

    Messages:
    8
    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2013
    Ha, I agree, but the low bar is tempting...

    Anyway, I've been really set on herringbone -- my original question was more about which herringbone rather than whether to go herringbone at all. I think after hearing from everyone on here, as consolation I'm going to go with no. 3, which is the smallest pattern and most likely to resemble a solid. Kent made my previous suit, which I love, so I'm pretty confident I'll love this one either way.

    Also, this has been nagging me a bit: Won't the same people who notice that I'm wearing the same herringbone charcoal suit all the time be the ones to notice I'm wearing the same solid charcoal suit all the time?
     
  20. msulinski

    msulinski Senior member

    Messages:
    2,139
    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2012
    Location:
    NYC
    Just be careful your herringbone doesn't end up looking like a self-stripe. I have one of these and don't wear it because of this.

    Also, since you already have a bird's eye, I am going to go with the consensus that a solid is the best option. I like charcoal over navy (barely) because you can wear navy ties with it.
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by