• STYLE. COMMUNITY. GREAT CLOTHING.

    Bored of counting likes on social networks? At Styleforum, you’ll find rousing discussions that go beyond strings of emojis.

    Click Here to join Styleforum's thousands of style enthusiasts today!

Artisanal Clothing and accessories discussion (MA+, CCP, Layer-0, Paul Harnden, Taichi Murakami, Bor

oulipien

Distinguished Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2015
Messages
1,500
Reaction score
1,176
There was a (black) fencing jacket on the realreal, oddly enough, but it was final sale by the time I saw it and I was leery of dropping whatever they wanted on something unreturnable which I wasn't sure would fit and which I definitely would not have looked as good as Seal in, so, alas.
 

skeen7908

Distinguished Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2010
Messages
2,280
Reaction score
1,332
Wow that outfit looks like dog shit

I imagine CCP might be a bit embarrassed
 

FlyingMonkey

Distinguished Member
Joined
Sep 5, 2011
Messages
5,219
Reaction score
5,792
So... I noticed earlier in this thread there was some discussion of the lack of innovation in this area, that basically the labels that the thread started with (and others that followed) have basically continued to do the same thing. I've been looking back on old seasons and seeing who's come and gone and there's still been very little that's changed with a very small number of exceptions (both in particular seasons for established labels and particular new, smaller ones).

I guess what I am looking for is the artisinal ethic and aesthetic but just not monochrome. I want to see innovative use of dyes and dye-processes, materials and texture, like Japanese workwear firms do (but more so), but with more of the aesthetic that this thread is promoting (I'm not looking for smooth high fashion stuff). I had high hopes for By Walid and Abasi Rosborough has done some interesting things; Rosen too. I've even found individual pieces from KKA that try harder and there's the odd thing I've noticed from Damir Doma, Avant Toi and Lost & Found. But it's still predominantly the same old, same old.

Are there any up-and-coming, obscure, interesting labels, or particular past seasons of old favourites, where some chances are being taken, some experimentation going on with materials, textures and colour? Or am just way off base even asking about this here? Feel free to tell me where the exit is...
 

Zamb

Distinguished Member
Affiliate Vendor
Joined
May 9, 2013
Messages
2,465
Reaction score
2,889
So... I noticed earlier in this thread there was some discussion of the lack of innovation in this area, that basically the labels that the thread started with (and others that followed) have basically continued to do the same thing. I've been looking back on old seasons and seeing who's come and gone and there's still been very little that's changed with a very small number of exceptions (both in particular seasons for established labels and particular new, smaller ones).

I guess what I am looking for is the artisinal ethic and aesthetic but just not monochrome. I want to see innovative use of dyes and dye-processes, materials and texture, like Japanese workwear firms do (but more so), but with more of the aesthetic that this thread is promoting (I'm not looking for smooth high fashion stuff). I had high hopes for By Walid and Abasi Rosborough has done some interesting things; Rosen too. I've even found individual pieces from KKA that try harder and there's the odd thing I've noticed from Damir Doma, Avant Toi and Lost & Found. But it's still predominantly the same old, same old.

Are there any up-and-coming, obscure, interesting labels, or particular past seasons of old favorites, where some chances are being taken, some experimentation going on with materials, textures and colour? Or am just way off base even asking about this here? Feel free to tell me where the exit is...
one of the fundamental problems of the Artisanal Niche from the very beginning is that a lot of its fans favored and promoted certain designers while ignoring others. it made it quite difficult to introduce new labels to the point where those labels are not particularly known to people who are not ardent fans or industry insiders

there are a lot of brands who have done good work and continue to do good work across many styles and taste within the artisanal spectrum

John Alexander Skelton, I have not handled his work in person but seen lots of it and it looks interesting.
Archivo JM Ribot
Beik Verstappen
Roggykei
Alexandr Manamis
there are a lot of others, but those just to name a few
 

FlyingMonkey

Distinguished Member
Joined
Sep 5, 2011
Messages
5,219
Reaction score
5,792
one of the fundamental problems of the Artisanal Niche from the very beginning is that a lot of its fans favored and promoted certain designers while ignoring others. it made it quite difficult to introduce new labels to the point where those labels are not particularly known to people who are not ardent fans or industry insiders

there are a lot of brands who have done good work and continue to do good work across many styles and taste within the artisanal spectrum

John Alexander Skelton, I have not handled his work in person but seen lots of it and it looks interesting.
Archivo JM Ribot
Beik Verstappen
Roggykei
Alexandr Manamis
there are a lot of others, but those just to name a few
Thanks for these suggestions. I will investigate further. Just from a quick look: Archivio JM Ribot, I really like; Manamis is interesting too.

And of course yourself... I should say I admire what you do, but it isn't me.
 
Last edited:

Zamb

Distinguished Member
Affiliate Vendor
Joined
May 9, 2013
Messages
2,465
Reaction score
2,889
Thanks for these suggestions. I will investigate further. Just from a quick look: Archivio JM Ribot, I really like; Manamis is interesting too.

And of course yourself... I should say I admire what you do, but it isn't me.
guys like Jan Jan Van Essche, are doing great work.

here in the USA I dont know who is, I like Abasi Roseborough but I dint know if I'd call it artisanal. For some strange reason, it seems very hard to develop and maintain an artisanal brand in the United States. of several that existed like Inaisce and even Odyn Vovk, im possibly the only one left in the US. I think some might consider Greg Lauren Artisanal, or even Bode.......
Gary Graham was great but he never did much menswear, and has actually closed shop and most upstate
 

nyarkies

Distinguished Member
Joined
Feb 3, 2009
Messages
1,246
Reaction score
996
So... I noticed earlier in this thread there was some discussion of the lack of innovation in this area, that basically the labels that the thread started with (and others that followed) have basically continued to do the same thing. I've been looking back on old seasons and seeing who's come and gone and there's still been very little that's changed with a very small number of exceptions (both in particular seasons for established labels and particular new, smaller ones).

I guess what I am looking for is the artisinal ethic and aesthetic but just not monochrome. I want to see innovative use of dyes and dye-processes, materials and texture, like Japanese workwear firms do (but more so), but with more of the aesthetic that this thread is promoting (I'm not looking for smooth high fashion stuff). I had high hopes for By Walid and Abasi Rosborough has done some interesting things; Rosen too. I've even found individual pieces from KKA that try harder and there's the odd thing I've noticed from Damir Doma, Avant Toi and Lost & Found. But it's still predominantly the same old, same old.

Are there any up-and-coming, obscure, interesting labels, or particular past seasons of old favourites, where some chances are being taken, some experimentation going on with materials, textures and colour? Or am just way off base even asking about this here? Feel free to tell me where the exit is...
As far as leather goes and I just found out about it recently, Isaac Sellam made use of a leather that can change its hue based on body temperature. It was a jacket from his SS19 collection. I'm not sure if that had been around for a while but it's new for me.

Edit: he used the material again for ss20 https://www.inn7fashion.com/pertinent

 
Last edited:

FlyingMonkey

Distinguished Member
Joined
Sep 5, 2011
Messages
5,219
Reaction score
5,792
I don't mind what we call Bode, but it's awful - I've said that before on this forum and don't want to labour the point. But in the context of this thread it's worth me saying why. I'd say it's the opposite of what this thread would consider 'artisanal' - it's exploiting the idea of 'artisanal' (in its literal sense) Americana to produce kitsch. Someone mentioned Kapital as a comparison when we discussed this elsewhere, and I disagreed, but I can see it now, not because I think better of Bode, but because a lot of what Kapital produces is kitsch too. It does some genuinely interesting things, some even actually artisanal (again, in the literal sense: mud-dyed sashiko denim for example), but a lot of crap that it gets away with because of the name.

On the American labels that are gone, I wonder whether it's in the nature of firms in this area either to be innovative and short-lived (and usually only appreciated after they are gone) or to find a (profitable-enough) groove and stick with it. God knows, it's hard enough to make a living in this business.
 

Zamb

Distinguished Member
Affiliate Vendor
Joined
May 9, 2013
Messages
2,465
Reaction score
2,889
I don't mind what we call Bode, but it's awful - I've said that before on this forum and don't want to labour the point. But in the context of this thread it's worth me saying why. I'd say it's the opposite of what this thread would consider 'artisanal' - it's exploiting the idea of 'artisanal' (in its literal sense) Americana to produce kitsch. Someone mentioned Kapital as a comparison when we discussed this elsewhere, and I disagreed, but I can see it now, not because I think better of Bode, but because a lot of what Kapital produces is kitsch too. It does some genuinely interesting things, some even actually artisanal (again, in the literal sense: mud-dyed sashiko denim for example), but a lot of crap that it gets away with because of the name.

On the American labels that are gone, I wonder whether it's in the nature of firms in this area either to be innovative and short-lived (and usually only appreciated after they are gone) or to find a (profitable-enough) groove and stick with it. God knows, it's hard enough to make a living in this business.
I think Bode is Artisanal, Artisanal means different things to different people, but I think rather than seeing artisanal as a visual aesthetic, a look I often look at it as a way of working.
by that i mean that I consider clothes that are produced through non industrialized processes and by skilled artisans rather than in a large production factory, to be artisanal

I am not a fan of Bode, I respect it, I respect what they do, but the style is not for me. they have been able to build a brand and connect with a customer base and this great, but I see it as a style for a customer who likes poetry, visit art galleries and do gardening. that's not my style.
My style is more for a rigged urban philosopher. one who drives performance cars, rides motorcycle, drinks artisanal beers rather than sips wine.

I don't know, the truth is that a lot of designers working in this niche are independently wealthy people. That doesn't mean they can afford to, or want to lose tons of money. Many like Ria Dunn of Lost and found have walked away.

I dont know why its hard in America, its hard for me, but we have many loyal customers here in the US who continues to buy and give us hope
 

FlyingMonkey

Distinguished Member
Joined
Sep 5, 2011
Messages
5,219
Reaction score
5,792
I think Bode is Artisanal, Artisanal means different things to different people, but I think rather than seeing artisanal as a visual aesthetic, a look I often look at it as a way of working.
by that i mean that I consider clothes that are produced through non industrialized processes and by skilled artisans rather than in a large production factory, to be artisanal
Yes, that's why I was making the distinction between artisinal in the aesthetic sense that this thread intended it and artisanal in literal / dictionary terms. And yes, I agree that Bode does fit the latter category (at least at the moment). But as I said, I find its aesthetic to be kitsch. It's not that kitsch is universally unacceptable - some people like it and carry it off well - but that's not what I'm looking for at all.

Many like Ria Dunn of Lost and found have walked away.
That's very sad. I really liked some of what she was doing.

But I also wonder whether there is ever going to be enough of a market for this kind of thing. As you know, artisanal production, especially if it involves unusual fabrics, complex dyeing processes and so on as well as highly skilled makers, cannot be inexpensive. But I was thinking as I was looing at what Archivio JM Ribot does, that the prices being charged for some of this stuff are extraordinary. There just can't be a sustainable market for such a niche aesthetic at that price. As you say, it's almost got to rely on the label owner having what used to be called 'independent means' (i.e. coming from money).

It's no wonder that people go to labels that mine the same artisinal aesthetic seam but aren't literally artisanal (like KKA or those other firms). Personally, I have to rely on the resale market - and the bottom end of the resale market at that - because there's no way I can justify buying new pieces to my family at those prices. That really isn't helping artisanal producers, except if the people I'm buying from are buying new stuff...
 
Last edited:

FlyingMonkey

Distinguished Member
Joined
Sep 5, 2011
Messages
5,219
Reaction score
5,792
I picked up this nice Lumen et Umbra grey linen coat (from a previous season, not sure which):

 

Mojo1990

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2014
Messages
695
Reaction score
103
Also check out Atelier Suppan, Communs, Bergfable, Casey Casey, Toogood..
Best thing is to search using # followed by the designer label on Instagram. This way you get a full spectrum of how individual stores handle and photoshoot the pieces they have ordered from each collection. This way you will also be acquainted with the various Asian/Japanese boutiques that specialize in quality wear.
 
Last edited:

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by

Featured Sponsor

Most Interesting Fashion Collaboration of 2020

  • JW Anderson x Uniqlo

  • Nigo x Virgil Abloh

  • Converse x Midnight Studios

  • Rick Owens x Champion

  • Barbour x Engineered Garments

  • Adidas x Bed JW Ford

  • Jordan Brand x Dior

  • Billie Eilish x Takashi Murakami

  • Lego x Levi's


Results are only viewable after voting.

Related Threads

Forum statistics

Threads
446,618
Messages
9,659,891
Members
201,846
Latest member
toughmeringue
Top