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Are you a bad tipper?

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by Ambulance Chaser, Feb 4, 2005.

  1. VMan

    VMan Senior member

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    (VersaceMan @ Feb. 14 2005,11:47) Am I the only one that thinks basing the tip on the cost of the meal makes no sense at all? Does the server really do any more work for the customer who orders a $70 steak and lobster dinner vs. a $15 pasta dinner? Â That said, I tend to be a good tipper, and tip based on the service. Â There have been instances where I haven't left a tip, because it was obvious the server was an arrogant a-hole and just saw me as a college kid with his date who probably wouldn't leave a good tip or order an expensive meal. I tend to tip about 20%, but on lower bills I'll leave more just because I feel like a cheapskate leaving a 75 cent tip. There is a local chain of diner-style restaurants in my city that are very popular with college kids and locals, especially late at night (open 24 hours). Â My friends and I always go to one near campus late at night. Â The bill for each person is usually only $3-6, but I always leave at least $2. Â I figure the waitress does a good job keeping my Coke full, bringing the food out as soon as it's done, not to mention the fact that they are working at 3am and they have tuition to pay, they deserve more than a 50 cent tip. Â One night at this restaurant I had a friendly waitress that has served us several times in the past, and I picked up the tab for a friend and I - left $20 for an $8.50 bill. Â She is always friendly to us and I was happy to do something nice for the day. Also, I always tip the pizza guy well when I order a pizza. Â Always a few bucks. Â Most likely 75% of the guy's deliveries are to college students given the neighborhood, so I figure that his tips are usually pretty weak. Also, I have always heard that you should tip on the pre-tax amount.
    VM, my feeling is that the server at a $75 a head place should be better at his job than the server at the $15 place. might not be more work, but it should require moore expereince and expertise. if this is not the case, I won't be going back to the more expensive place.
    Globetrotter, Good point. However, consider that the restaurant is the same; one table has a $90 tab for two people (two large steaks) and another table has a $30 tab for two people (two sandwiches). Assume no alcohol was purchased, and all four dinners ordered came with soup. Did the waiter work three times as hard to bring the food out for table #1? Should the service for table #2 be three times worse?
     
  2. nightowl6261a

    nightowl6261a Senior member

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    HS, I can understand your theory, but for an example, we have 8% taxes here, now a dinner the other night for 4 was $275 roughly, it was my turn to buy, now the pre-tax amount was roughly $250....to me there is a difference in a $50 tip and a $55...not much, but it is still the point, 20% was more than fair...do you not think, for 2 hours work.
     
  3. ViroBono

    ViroBono Senior member

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    I have to say that I previously had no idea that tipping was so complex in the US - or the subject of so much debate. When I have been in the US I have always based tips entirely on the service received. Thankfully, things are much simpler here - tipping of pizza or curry delivery drivers is not generally done, for example, and there's no sales tax on meals eaten in restaurants - such a relief for the 'socially retarded'.... [​IMG]
     
  4. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    (globetrotter @ Feb. 14 2005,13:54)
    Am I the only one that thinks basing the tip on the cost of the meal makes no sense at all? Does the server really do any more work for the customer who orders a $70 steak and lobster dinner vs. a $15 pasta dinner? Â That said, I tend to be a good tipper, and tip based on the service. Â There have been instances where I haven't left a tip, because it was obvious the server was an arrogant a-hole and just saw me as a college kid with his date who probably wouldn't leave a good tip or order an expensive meal. I tend to tip about 20%, but on lower bills I'll leave more just because I feel like a cheapskate leaving a 75 cent tip. There is a local chain of diner-style restaurants in my city that are very popular with college kids and locals, especially late at night (open 24 hours). Â My friends and I always go to one near campus late at night. Â The bill for each person is usually only $3-6, but I always leave at least $2. Â I figure the waitress does a good job keeping my Coke full, bringing the food out as soon as it's done, not to mention the fact that they are working at 3am and they have tuition to pay, they deserve more than a 50 cent tip. Â One night at this restaurant I had a friendly waitress that has served us several times in the past, and I picked up the tab for a friend and I - left $20 for an $8.50 bill. Â She is always friendly to us and I was happy to do something nice for the day. Also, I always tip the pizza guy well when I order a pizza. Â Always a few bucks. Â Most likely 75% of the guy's deliveries are to college students given the neighborhood, so I figure that his tips are usually pretty weak. Also, I have always heard that you should tip on the pre-tax amount.
    VM, my feeling is that the server at a $75 a head place should be better at his job than the server at the $15 place. might not be more work, but it should require moore expereince and expertise. if this is not the case, I won't be going back to the more expensive place.
    Globetrotter, Good point. Â However, consider that the restaurant is the same; one table has a $90 tab for two people (two large steaks) and another table has a $30 tab for two people (two sandwiches). Â Assume no alcohol was purchased, and all four dinners ordered came with soup. Â Did the waiter work three times as hard to bring the food out for table #1? Â Should the service for table #2 be three times worse?
    good point. I have never given it that much thought.
     
  5. nightowl6261a

    nightowl6261a Senior member

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    God, why can't we have curry delivered here....and good curry like in the UK...globe-trotter will agree with me on that I am sure.
     
  6. hopkins_student

    hopkins_student Senior member

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    I suppose that my point was that you should tip reasonably within your means. If the difference between tipping pre- or post-tax means that much to you, don't do it. But if it isn't going to negatively impact your lifestyle, why not go for it?
     
  7. nightowl6261a

    nightowl6261a Senior member

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    I guess my thing is from the accounting aspect of tipping, and from being a business man working with what people make,and judgementally I was raised one way, tip on the food total...will it break me to do the other, no, if it would I surely should not be eating out...you know, I had a glass of wine before dinner the other night, as did my wife, my tab was $15, I left a 20, went to my table and ate...maybe it just comes down to service, and how good it is....who knows, I don't carry a calculator up my ass, I just tip the way it feels good, generally because it is usually more than enough, and I guess now I am going to tip the damn pizza guy too, it is all the SF's fault.
     
  8. ViroBono

    ViroBono Senior member

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    Whilst we certainly have some excellent curries here (I was at Veeraswamy in London the other night - recommended), they are the easiest thing in the world to make. The secret is in avoiding shop-bought ready made sauces, and making your own. If anyone is interested I will post my simple but winning recipe on a new thread.
     
  9. hopkins_student

    hopkins_student Senior member

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    For the record, I certainly think it is a good idea to tip the pizza guy...well. I've done experiments on this. I normally tip $2.xx to bring it to an even total. Several times I've made it $3.xx, and after each of these tips, the following service has always been markedly faster than the time quoted. Just something to think about.
     
  10. nightowl6261a

    nightowl6261a Senior member

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    Send it along, I have not had good curry since, let me see, New Years 2004, I was in london and the Mid-Lands for about 5 days, and the curry, almost made me stay.



    Edit Would this be in need of a tip?
     
  11. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    (ViroBono @ Feb. 14 2005,15:04) I have to say that I previously had no idea that tipping was so complex in the US - or the subject of so much debate. Â When I have been in the US I have always based tips entirely on the service received. Â Thankfully, things are much simpler here - tipping of pizza or curry delivery drivers is not generally done, for example, and there's no sales tax on meals eaten in restaurants - such a relief for the 'socially retarded'.... Â [​IMG]
    God, why can't we have curry delivered here....and good curry like in the UK...globe-trotter will agree with me on that I am sure.
    hmmmmmm [​IMG]
     
  12. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Senior member

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    hopkins,

    I recently had a meal at Aureole (in Las Vegas) in which the final bill was north of $3000. Given those parameters, the difference in a gratuity based on the sales tax would be about $40-50 depending on your rate of tipping. Do you think the server(s) should receive an extra $50 for doing absolutely nothing except happening in a state with 7.5% state sales tax? I'd rather give the money directly to the sommelier for excellent wine service.
     
  13. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    (nightowl6261a @ Feb. 14 2005,12:06) God, why can't we have curry delivered here....and good curry like in the UK...globe-trotter will agree with me on that I am sure.
    Whilst we certainly have some excellent curries here (I was at Veeraswamy in London the other night - recommended), they are the easiest thing in the world to make. Â The secret is in avoiding shop-bought ready made sauces, and making your own. Â If anyone is interested I will post my simple but winning recipe on a new thread.
    no offence meant VB, but making a good british style curry is the easist thing in the world. making a good curry requires having an indian grandmother who gets up at 6 am to make it [​IMG]
     
  14. Fabienne

    Fabienne Senior member

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    (nightowl6261a @ Feb. 14 2005,12:06) God, why can't we have curry delivered here....and good curry like in the UK...globe-trotter will agree with me on that I am sure.
    Whilst we certainly have some excellent curries here (I was at Veeraswamy in London the other night - recommended), they are the easiest thing in the world to make. Â The secret is in avoiding shop-bought ready made sauces, and making your own. Â If anyone is interested I will post my simple but winning recipe on a new thread.
    There we go. Let's all go home and cook and thus close the thread. [​IMG]
     
  15. hopkins_student

    hopkins_student Senior member

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    Well drizzt, everything should be considered within reason, that's why I used the example of a $100 meal (that and I've never been to dinner with any amount of people that has come even close to $3000). I'd imagine that most people on the SF, even when at dinner with two or three people, rarely go over $100 on a regular basis (excluding those of you with ungodly wine consumption habits). I think up to two or three hundred dollars, what I would consider to be the maximum that any two people should spend on dinner, again excluding alcohol, that if you can afford to tip on the post-tax without it imposing on your lifestyle, you may as well.
     
  16. Styleman

    Styleman Senior member

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    Take this for being rewarded as a customer for tipping well;

    At a Thai restaurant I have lunch at most days, I normally tip about 10 pounds on a 30 pound bill, which is a hell of a lot for British standards, sometimes when the bill goes a little over 30 and I give 2 twenties they get a little less tip. I generally just give 2 20s and whatever is left is theirs. Sometimes, when I spend a bit longer there, say have some desert, or if I go with clients instead of others from the office, I'll give a little more. Once the bill was 45 and I gave a 25 pound tip.

    Now once I visited, just a lunch with a couple of people from the office, and I paid the bill. Our conversation was still going on, it went on for about twenty minutes (and the restaurant is never very busy, so that is not an excuse) and the bill still did not return to the table with the change. I left, suffice to say I was very pissed off with this attitude (even if the change to return was only 7 pounds)

    In addition, I do not see how it is any more difficult for a server to bring me a bottle of Dom Perignon, than it is to bring me a bottle of Lanson, the % idea is quite ridiculous. Same goes with food, is it harder to carry a plate of Foie Gras than it is of boiled potatoes, actually I would say the potatoes are harder, as they may burn their hands.

    I think the servers really need to stop whining.
     
  17. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    (drizzt3117 @ Feb. 14 2005,12:31) hopkins, I recently had a meal at Aureole (in Las Vegas) in which the final bill was north of $3000. Â Given those parameters, the difference in a gratuity based on the sales tax would be about $40-50 depending on your rate of tipping. Â Do you think the server(s) should receive an extra $50 for doing absolutely nothing except happening in a state with 7.5% state sales tax? Â I'd rather give the money directly to the sommelier for excellent wine service.
    Well drizzt, everything should be considered within reason, that's why I used the example of a $100 meal (that and I've never been to dinner with any amount of people that has come even close to $3000). Â I'd imagine that most people on the SF, even when at dinner with two or three people, rarely go over $100 on a regular basis (excluding those of you with ungodly wine consumption habits). Â I think up to two or three hundred dollars, what I would consider to be the maximum that any two people should spend on dinner, again excluding alcohol, that if you can afford to tip on the post-tax without it imposing on your lifestyle, you may as well.
    I don't tip the server on the wine, however, if the wine is more than the food. I believe that that is the common practice, no?
     
  18. nightowl6261a

    nightowl6261a Senior member

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    Styleman earns the honesty award today...congrats for the comment.....power to the masses. [​IMG]
     
  19. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Senior member

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    Well, if you're not dining at Masa and your tab is $3k and not mostly wine, you're eating at pretty expensive places [​IMG] Generally it isn't accepted practice to tip on the wine (because the sommelier will generally make a commission for selling bottles, at a nicer restaurant) but some people do in any case (they figure it's an expense acct, so whatever) I generally will give a lower percentage tip for the wine portion of my bill.
     
  20. ViroBono

    ViroBono Senior member

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    No offence taken, but I have to disagree. I know of several curry-houses who can ruin a perfectly good curry. Most 'Indian' restaurants in Britain are, incidentally, run by Pakistanis or Bangladeshis. The most popular dish is chicken tikka masala, which is entirely unknown in Asia. Some of the best curries I have had are those cooked at Johhny Ghurka, an eccentric Nepalese restaurant in Aldershot. The goat version is fantastic. Anyway, for those not in possession of an Indian grandmother, I have now posted my own recipe for anyone who cares to experiment.
     

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