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Are you a bad tipper?

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by Ambulance Chaser, Feb 4, 2005.

  1. nightowl6261a

    nightowl6261a Senior member

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    I am so happy to irritate, now let us break down the points you make. My Domino's and Pizza Hut directly charges a delivery fee, which makes free delivery a thing of the past, they do this to cover overhead and expenses related to increased costs of ingredients etc. Â see article Pizza Delivery Fee... Now for the rest of the break down again: Drivers in ATL are paid on average $8.50 and hour, plus mileage, normally $.35 per mile, plus a per pie charge, generally $.90. Now let us look at the rest, if a driver works and 8 hour shift, delivers 3 pies an hour, drives on average 100 miles in that 8 hours, he makes roughly without tips around $123, how uneducated people do you know making $15 an hour before even getting tips. Also, do you think the 35 cents a mile does not cover the maintenance on a car for driving 100 miles a night. I am not sure what you pay for a rotation and oil change, but I can guarantee that 2 weekends of 8 hour shifts will take care of it on an every other month basis and still leave money in the wallet. As to insurance, you already have it, and very few people are getting special delivery insurance to boot, if they are they are stupid. And to the overall driver responsibility, do you not think the driver knows that as a delivery guy he has expenses surrounding this line of work. The mileage money is not put in to be part of the pay, it is there to be expense money. I have a job, I drive back and forth in grueling traffic daily, but I do not get money for car maintenance, and I drive easily 20,000 a year, so maybe I should start asking for tips from customers just for me showing up....actually a good thing, when we next have a sale, I am going to put delivery charges for me showing up to work.
     
  2. nightowl6261a

    nightowl6261a Senior member

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    hey, piss J off a little more....please.
     
  3. Tokyo Slim

    Tokyo Slim Senior member

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    Your analogy again is flawed, you are assuming in comparison that your pizza was delivered late, or that it wasn't hot, or that it wasn't in good condition or something. All of which I have NO PROBLEM with a non-tipper for. All of those things are my fault.

    I have a problem when I am fast, the pizza is hot, and delicious, I'm courteous, smiling, I bring extras like mints, peppers, parm, and napkins, I'm presentable, and I count back your change if there is any - and the door shuts in my face. Thats what this whole discussion is about.

    Not people who don't tip for bad service, but people who don't tip at all. Cheap bastards.



    Oh, and by the way, nightowl - your delivery drivers in ATL are getting paid WAY more than any pizza delivery driver I've ever heard of.

    I do not get mileage, I do not get gas money, I do get $.80 a delivery from the $1 delivery fee, but I include that in my "tip" money and is thusly already accounted for.

    AND I am already paying $260 or so a month for full coverage insurance, seeing as how I have a car that I'm still paying off, its not the "delivery" insurance, which of course, no delivery driver outside Atlanta can afford.

    Maybe I should move to Atlanta...
     
  4. nightowl6261a

    nightowl6261a Senior member

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    See Tokyo, a delivery guy like you deserves a little something, not because you delivered the pie, but because you went a little further than most do...I order from Dominos or who ever, they do not bring napkins, plates or plastic forks, they dump the pie, I give a 20 and they bigen to walk away, with no offer for change etc...that pisses me off, make an inquiry, I would be more apt to give a tip for a little service.

    You are right, you should, these guys make that much because no adults will work for that little in this traffic like it is here.
     
  5. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Senior member

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    Well, if you're read my posts about this topic, I've said that I give tips when I get good service and I don't have a problem with doing so, I just have a problem with those individuals who think they deserve a tip whether they do a good job or not (i.e., it's part of their salary and they should get it, even if they are late, etc...)
     
  6. Tokyo Slim

    Tokyo Slim Senior member

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    I am not a valet, taxi driver, or waiter (nor a sommelier) I thereby made the logical conclusion that you do not tip the pizza guy.

    And to be honest with you, I don't really agree that business consulting falls into the realm of "the service industry" but then again, I could be wrong. I, myself, have never been a "consultant".

    (*strech*yawn*, off to deliver pizzas to the elitist yuppy scum of the earth. have a good day everyone.)
     
  7. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Senior member

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    I actually said this earlier,

    "I'll usually tip a couple bucks for Pizza delivery, maybe 10% or so of the bill, rounded up to the nearest dollar."

    so I assumed people understood that I did tip for pizza delivery.
     
  8. topcatny

    topcatny Senior member

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    It shows the total, because that is the amount you need to add your tip to in order to determine the total amount to charge your credit card.

    By the same logic why does the receipt you get before the one you sign have a sub-total line, a line for tax and a total line?

    I hardly think the slip of paper you sign is proof that you are intended to tip on the total bill.

    And if you keep pissing off J, this could end up being more interesting than I originally thought.
     
  9. Drew

    Drew Well-Known Member

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    (nightowl6261a @ Feb. 14 2005,05:56) Now honestly, do I feel a salesperson need be tipped, no, but I am trying to figure out why waiters and servers feel that when they do not adequately service, they feel still entitled to a generous tip. Is every job that deals with the public not truly a service industry job in some ways?
    Depending on where a salesperson works, they have incentives, spiffs, and commission they work for. The people who work at busy stores, have regular clientele, and are good salespeople can do very well. Even if you don't think a salesperson was particularly attentive, or if you walked into a store knowing you were going to buy an item anyway, commission goes to the guy who is fortuitous enough to be standing near the register to push the buttons and put your wares in a bag. Serving, OTOH, is a much longer transaction that requires more attention and is in theory more tailored to a patron's needs and desires, but what their service is worth is up to however generous or stingy that patron wishes to be. Servers feel entitled to 20% every table they take because they feel that their efforts warrant it, and many of them feel they do their job well on every table. Their perception is their own reality. People who tip 12-15% of the pretax and meticulously grade their server may feel that they are getting their money's worth, and are giving the server a most accurate appraisal of the experience they have provided. Whether it is because they assume the server is a lackey who doesn't know how to do their job, they're stingy, or they're just particular about how they are served, their perception is also their own reality. Personally, grading unless it is in an extreme case--uncorrected server error versus kitchen error, glasses not refilled, waiting inordinate amount of time for the check, change, credit slip--is not worth it to me. Frankly, I don't understand why someone would want to, and that's not because I am a server. It's because I feel that a couple of bucks is usually all that separates a bad tip from a good one, and it is a negligible amount in the grand scheme of a meal out.
     
  10. nightowl6261a

    nightowl6261a Senior member

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    Here here....
     
  11. j

    j Senior member Admin

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    Quite possible, but irrelevant. You, on the other hand, are delusional.
    A (pre-answer answer): I try to pay cash, so I don't have to have the server back and forth bringing me receipts and crap. But in the case I use a card, the reason why it shows ONLY THE TOTAL AMOUNT is that that is what you will need to add your tip to, to come up with the final total, which is written below; also, it's so that the credit card receipt doesn't get confusing with all kinds of different totals. The check, which is that thing that comes from the restaurant before my method of payment is known, includes a subtotal, on which a customer is to apply a tip. Why do you think you should get paid more for being a server in a state with sales tax? Do you think that translates in any way to the amount of service you provide? If I eat in Vancouver WA, on the border with Oregon (which has no tax), I am not going to pay a 9% higher tip to my server there than the poor bastard who happens to live in OR. Besides being poor logic, it's not established practice.
    Yes, that must be it, because I'm socially retarded and cheap, correct? Au contraire, mon frere, you're justifying your extreme bitterness with whatever it is in your life that causes it by blaming it on your job and the socially retarded creatures you deign to serve. And now you are blaming me, and getting more pissed off, even though I have already told you I tip pretty well and expect relatively little. You're giving your profession a bad name, pal. Going a long way toward justifying your crap tips in the future. I eagerly await your next belittling, bitter, sad comment. Have a GREAT DAY. Â [​IMG]
     
  12. Debaser

    Debaser Well-Known Member

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    Really? Two links have already been posted regarding tipping etiquette. Both have declared it proper to tip based on the total amount, not the pre-tax subtotal. Care to cite a source for your "established" practice?
     
  13. Ambulance Chaser

    Ambulance Chaser Senior member

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    If you're referring to the links I provided, the first one stated that the tip should be on the pre-tax amount, the second stated that the tip should be on the total bill.  That leads me to believe there is no set rule.
     
  14. j

    j Senior member Admin

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    From http://www.tipping.org/tips/TipsPageRestaurant.html :
    The other link, http://azaz.essortment.com/tipping_rdef.htm is undefined on the matter, as though it says "total bill" it does not mention tax. However, this one does, and it says pre-tax, as does this one, this one, this one... seriously, do I need to go on? Pretty much every guide that mentions tax says pre-tax. Feel free to continue your wishful thinking/campaign to change the world, though. I notice that you totally ignored my other points.
     
  15. nightowl6261a

    nightowl6261a Senior member

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    At the restaurant: tips for the maitre 'd or host are a bit outdated unless you're a repeat business customer. But waiters depend on tips - their salaries go almost entirely for taxes. So 15-percent is standard, but it's closer to 20 percent, especially in big cities. Before taxes if the food and wine is $100, you'd leave $20. If there is a wine steward or sommelier, 15 percent of the wine tab goes to him or her. On a $30 bottle of wine that's six dollars. Tipping Source #1 Tips Your waiters tip is his primary income. You should tip 15% of the total before taxes, 20% for outstanding service is perfectly acceptable. Even if service is less then perfect, you should still leave at least 10% tip "”unless it was a nightmare"”in which case, you should talk with the management or maÃ[​IMG]tre d' . It is not out of line to send complements to the chief or to even ask for the chef to come to the table if possible. Chefs love to be praised for their food, even though in most big restaurants he or she is a manager and not a cook. Source #2 I can go on....but this does dis-spell your theory on tipping the final total...only tip on the net amount...not the tax
     
  16. Ambulance Chaser

    Ambulance Chaser Senior member

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    I'm convinced.  No tip on tax from this day forward.
     
  17. VMan

    VMan Senior member

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    Am I the only one that thinks basing the tip on the cost of the meal makes no sense at all?

    Does the server really do any more work for the customer who orders a $70 steak and lobster dinner vs. a $15 pasta dinner?  

    That said, I tend to be a good tipper, and tip based on the service.  There have been instances where I haven't left a tip, because it was obvious the server was an arrogant a-hole and just saw me as a college kid with his date who probably wouldn't leave a good tip or order an expensive meal.

    I tend to tip about 20%, but on lower bills I'll leave more just because I feel like a cheapskate leaving a 75 cent tip.

    There is a local chain of diner-style restaurants in my city that are very popular with college kids and locals, especially late at night (open 24 hours).  My friends and I always go to one near campus late at night.  The bill for each person is usually only $3-6, but I always leave at least $2.  I figure the waitress does a good job keeping my Coke full, bringing the food out as soon as it's done, not to mention the fact that they are working at 3am and they have tuition to pay, they deserve more than a 50 cent tip.  One night at this restaurant I had a friendly waitress that has served us several times in the past, and I picked up the tab for a friend and I - left $20 for an $8.50 bill.  She is always friendly to us and I was happy to do something nice for the day.

    Also, I always tip the pizza guy well when I order a pizza.  Always a few bucks.  Most likely 75% of the guy's deliveries are to college students given the neighborhood, so I figure that his tips are usually pretty weak.

    Also, I have always heard that you should tip on the pre-tax amount.
     
  18. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    VM,

    my feeling is that the server at a $75 a head place should be better at his job than the server at the $15 place. might not be more work, but it should require moore expereince and expertise. if this is not the case, I won't be going back to the more expensive place.
     
  19. j

    j Senior member Admin

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    Yeah, I pretty much agree with V-Man's scheme. I never leave less than 2 bucks even on a really cheap food bill, typically a dollar on each drink at a bar, and typically 20%+ of the pre-tax if the service was good on anything else.

    Where it gets confusing is in those places where you have to bus your own table, get your own utensils, cafeterias, and when you get a drink at the bar vs. having a waitress come out with it, etc.

    Edit: and it is kind of lame how a simple order of the most expensive thing on the menu gets tipped way more than a really irritating, detailed order for two salads with all kinds of crap on the side, cheap drinks to refill, etc. I also tend to scale tips based on the amount of work I made the guy/girl do.
     
  20. hopkins_student

    hopkins_student Senior member

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    I'm going to agree with VersaceMan on almost every point. I am generally a pretty good tipper, and I inherited this characteristic from my parents. Also, I will preface this by saying that the money I spend isn't mine. I am a student and my parents successes have allowed me to live pretty comfortably as a student, and for that I am extremely lucky and readily acknowledge that.

    However, I tip on the post tax total. Where I am from, Kentucky, we have 6% sales tax (where I live, in Maryland, it is only 5%). In Kentucky, tipping on the post tax amount for a $20 bill adds $.15. Not a great deal. So, for a $100 meal, tipping on post tax will increase the total by a whole $.90. Ninety cents doesn't make a big difference in my life, but I assume that to a server, who in an eight hour shift will serve maybe fifteen or twenty tables, the additional $13.50 to $18.00 will make a big difference, especially considering that his marginal utility is considerably greater than mine (or that of the other patrons who I am hoping are putting the additional $.90 in their tip).
     

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