Are non-top 100 liberal arts degrees worthless in the eyes of employers?

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by stevejobs, Mar 16, 2008.

  1. haganah

    haganah Senior member

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    They run companies that employ engineers.
    Some of us* also invest and buy those companies [​IMG] Let's rub it in!!! RUB RUB RUB * Top 100? I think not
     


  2. hi-val

    hi-val Senior member

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    Before I was looking at law school, I was shopping around for jobs at big businesses. Proctor and Gamble had several job openings that were explicitly restricted to Lib Arts majors. These were creative team and project management jobs. It looked pretty tempting to this kid with philosophy and history degrees. They're looking for people who, when the engineers invent cling wrap, have an idea of what to use it for.

    The jobs are out there. Part of getting a job with a lib arts degree is knowing that you have to make your own job there or create a position. It's also knowing that 90% of job openings are never posted publicly.
     


  3. Concordia

    Concordia Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I can't see someone majoring in say, History, taking all the necessary coursework in the Sciences in addition to their History courses to get into medical school.

    That is exactly what my mother did. She wanted to study history and wanted to go to medical school. It required a summer at Harvard to catch up on one or two science classes, but it wasn't impossible.
     


  4. stevejobs

    stevejobs Senior member

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    Before I was looking at law school, I was shopping around for jobs at big businesses. Proctor and Gamble had several job openings that were explicitly restricted to Lib Arts majors. These were creative team and project management jobs. It looked pretty tempting to this kid with philosophy and history degrees. They're looking for people who, when the engineers invent cling wrap, have an idea of what to use it for.

    The jobs are out there. Part of getting a job with a lib arts degree is knowing that you have to make your own job there or create a position. It's also knowing that 90% of job openings are never posted publicly.


    My OP was not a ding at liberal arts majors in general, but whether there was a sufficient value proposition in getting one from a college outside the top-tier institutions as it relates to how an employer would see that college as a plus consideration. My question asked more about the relative merits of graduating from a lesser-cost state school or a more expensive private school (ignoring the effects of scholarship aid). My friend said in his opinion it wasn't "worth" it in terms of ROI and dealing with a greater student loan burden.
     


  5. Concordia

    Concordia Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    THat's different from where the thread went.

    Ultimately, the best value degree is the one where you ended up excelling in an area that was interesting to you. If you do that, you get good grades, good recommendations to grad schools, referrals to alumni, etc. As well as a good life experience. Do you want to do this at a smaller, lower-profile community where everyone knows your name, or at a really big place where perhaps you were able to elbow out the marginally interested to really nail your specialty?
     


  6. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    I'd say that there are different issues here. First, I think that it is probrably harder to get a starting job with a non-technical degree. If you have a ba in english, you have to sjw what you bring to the table when you apply for a job.

    But my experience is that top management and espectially sales and marketing are less likly to have a tech background, even in high tech.

    In one company I worked for there was a huge political war between people with engineering backgeound in manegment and people without. The question basically was if a regional manager with an engineering backgeound was better or less effective than one without. In my present company, the ceo and 4 of 5 vps are all engineers but they brought in all non engineer directors wh manage the sales and marketing. In 20 years I have yet to meet an engineer who undestands sales.

    My education is economics and philosophy. I have always had engineers reporting to me, several years ago, a friend of mine tought at one of the top (possibly the top) business school in the world. He asked me to take part in a mentoring program and I mentored 5 mba students all had engineering backgeounds. It was pretty funny, actually, because I am sure that they would have been shocked and appalled at my educstional backgound but there was a huge amount that they could learn from just a basic understanding of philosophy.
     


  7. fashion_newbie

    fashion_newbie Senior member

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    Got a liberal arts education and am currently an investment banker. Most of my friends are bankers or consultants with some going into the non-profit route as well as think tanks and policy research organizations.
    There are lots of opportunities, your options are far wider than an engineering background, for example, because your education wasn't as narrow. Really comes down to what you like to do. Some of my best friends are engineers and they love it, while others hate it.

    With that said, I would try to go to a top-50 program. Not to say you wouldn't get a job but personally, I don't see the point in going to a liberal arts program ranked #120 and spenidng a 100K on it. I'd rather go to a state school at that point (and do really well in it) and then get into a better grad school, assuming you want to go to grad school.
     


  8. hi-val

    hi-val Senior member

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    And otherwise, what's the alternative? Not go to school? Study something you hate so you can get a job? College is just about always worth it. Now someone will come along with their "I'm 19 and own 1.2mill in property because I'm smart like that" statement...
     


  9. Merckx

    Merckx Senior member

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    On a unrelated topic I've heard only 30% of Americans have a college degree, what do the rest of the 70% do?

    They do the work that helps run the country.
     


  10. skalogre

    skalogre Senior member

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    The fact that you can't handle an actual answer to your "serious question" is simply more evidence of your ilk's illusions of grandeur.

    Oh please. Put some fucking malt vinegar on it and eat it.
     


  11. whacked

    whacked Senior member

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    And otherwise, what's the alternative? Not go to school? Study something you hate so you can get a job? College is just about always worth it. Now someone will come along with their "I'm 19 and own 1.2mill in property because I'm smart like that" statement...

    "You guys need to get out more..."
    http://www.styleforum.net/showthread.php?t=59765
     


  12. lawyerdad

    lawyerdad Senior member

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    Surely you see that most of these are exceptional cases. How many people end up becoming President, CEO, Professional Athlete, or an Actor...


    No, I really don't, except to the extent becoming a CEO or General is exceptional by definition. I think it's fairly common. My limited anecdotal information suggests that while doctors with liberal arts degrees are a minority, they are far from "exceptional".
     


  13. Jelly or Syrup

    Jelly or Syrup Senior member

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    Got a liberal arts education and am currently an investment banker. Most of my friends are bankers or consultants with some going into the non-profit route as well as think tanks and policy research organizations.
    There are lots of opportunities, your options are far wider than an engineering background, for example, because your education wasn't as narrow. Really comes down to what you like to do. Some of my best friends are engineers and they love it, while others hate it.

    With that said, I would try to go to a top-50 program. Not to say you wouldn't get a job but personally, I don't see the point in going to a liberal arts program ranked #120 and spenidng a 100K on it. I'd rather go to a state school at that point (and do really well in it) and then get into a better grad school, assuming you want to go to grad school.


    i have a friend who graduated with LA degree, he's an invest banker and lives in chicago maybe you might know him...
     


  14. Coho

    Coho Senior member

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  15. Coho

    Coho Senior member

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    A lot of the guys who grew up in the ghettos join the US military.

    This is America's way of getting back at Muslims, I think. They send us their Jihadists with strapped bombs. We send them guys from broken homes with M-16s. [​IMG]


    They do the work that helps run the country.
     


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