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Are Chinos Fashionable in the UK?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by AdamUK, Mar 12, 2018.

  1. Chouan

    Chouan Distinguished Member

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    I repeat, how many people wear a coat like that?
     


  2. Chouan

    Chouan Distinguished Member

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    Good. I like fun.
     


  3. Chouan

    Chouan Distinguished Member

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    I would imagine that the bloke who posted the "witty" Singapore comment thought that he was just having fun. At least yours was amusing.
     


  4. AdamUK

    AdamUK Active Member

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  5. Count de Monet

    Count de Monet Distinguished Member

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    This is an interesting discussion to me. Though having no military background myself, and perhaps because of that, it makes for interesting reading about the several articles of clothing mentioned here that apparently were never officially military but were so widely worn by those in service that they became subject to military regulation as to use.

    Conversely, I'm guessing there are no doubt some articles that have remained (I assume) absolutely "official" though their original practical function and use ended years ago.

    E.g., I have read a bit about historical flight jackets, especially leather ones. The G-1 leather flight jacket, under one name or another, was officially issued flight gear by the U.S. Navy going back prior to the U.S.'s entry into WWII (when it was the M-422). With the arrival of the jet age, and especially after the Korean War, more high tech flight gear, including fire retardant Nomex jackets, were issued for actual wear in flight but the Navy kept issuing the G-1 because it was so popular long after it had no practical use. Finally, in the late 70's the Navy dropped it all together as a cost saving measure, regardless of the cool factor. I've read that one of the first things Reagan's Secretary of the Navy did upon assuming his position in '81 was to bring back (by popular demand) the G-1 (just in time for Tom Cruise).

    Even more curious to me is that despite the jacket by then having absolutely no practical use for its originally intended purpose, it had not been struck from the list of official flight gear. So for practical reasons you could not wear it as flight gear but for regulatory reasons, since it remained officially flight gear, it could not (officially) be worn off base/ship. I imagine like the green jackets at Augusta National. I think they finally changed that rule (the Navy; not the folks at the Masters).

    Not to be out done, when the Navy brought back the G-1, shortly thereafter the Air Force re-introduced the A-2 after a forty year absence. I think the Navy and USAF continue to issue the G-1 and A-2 respectively to this day.

    Anyway, please continue. Sorry to sidetrack things for a moment.
     


  6. comrade

    comrade Distinguished Member

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    I wore my Dads A-2 from when he served in the storied 8th Air force 1943-45.
    It later went to my nephew. I have no idea whether it is still in the family.
     


  7. Count de Monet

    Count de Monet Distinguished Member

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    My dad was in the 4th, USAAF, 1943-46. I’d seen pictures of him in a B-3 and asked him once if he had made if home with it. He said, “no, I was busy trying to find a way to bring home some of those nice tools.”
     


  8. emptym

    emptym Moderator Moderator

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    I can't imagine d-rings having much non-military use (well, outside construction, exploration or some similar time you'd want access to a tool that could get wet), but the others are common to regular jackets and have everyday purposes:

    Epaulets, or should straps I think you mean, are helpful for anyone who carries a shoulder bag, since they keep the bag from falling off one's shoulder. They're still found on some motorcycle jackets for that reason. The "gun flap" on a trench like the one in your pic is just intended to be buttoned over the regular jacket flap in order to keep rain out. A lot of jackets have smaller versions that don't button over the jacket flap, and those are just for decoration. They'd need to be padded to really be helpful for a rifle. Rearward facing flaps are easier to slip one's hands into. If they were to prevent snags I'd think they'd be forward facing, since you'd be more likely to get a snag when holding something, like a revolver.

    Now, maybe these things did arise in military use, but it doesn't seem self-evident that they're military-specific.
     


  9. Patrick R

    Patrick R Distinguished Member

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    Understanding the conversation has moved well past this, I still wanted to quote it and voice my strong agreement.
     


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