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Apartment foo-nishing

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by mafoofan, Jun 16, 2013.

  1. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

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    I would keep looking, the MCM you posted in the other thread was better than this. I have not been to Houston or DFW, but when in Austin, TX there was a lot of interesting buildings and houses.
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2013
  2. Cantabrigian

    Cantabrigian Senior member

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    If you got rid of the furniture, curtains and fireplace then - I agree - it would cease to be ConTrad.

    You'd be left with a set of tall white walls one of which includes a very nice circular window for all your high-up circular window needs. And it was kind of them to get rid of one of those pesky lower windows to allow for a big honkin' TV mounted on the wall.

    The floor looks fine to me. But my flat could fit inside the obligatory walk-in closet in that McMasterpiece so I have very little flooring to look at on a daily basis.
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2013
    1 person likes this.
  3. Bounder

    Bounder Senior member

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    The biggest problem is all those windows.

    They give you a view of, well, Texas.
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. Cantabrigian

    Cantabrigian Senior member

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    What if your neighbor has a slightly larger McMansion?

    You will need to put a 77" TV in front of every window to hide your shame and distract youself from wallowing in your mediocrity.
     
    1 person likes this.
  5. furo

    furo Senior member

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    Totally agree on which is more interesting and desirable - the MCM in Dallas I posted in the other thread had tons more character.
     
  6. Bounder

    Bounder Senior member

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    Even better, or maybe worse, as I understand the concept, eating rice out of bamboo trunks in Prague isn't wabi sabi at all.
     
  7. Jerome

    Jerome Senior member

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    It wasn't in Prague. Not to understand me wrong, it is a normal word and an aesthetic concept only I hadn't heard it in daily conversation, then. Sabi-shii means lonely sometimes with the hidden connotation of showing rust age patina since it has a homonym written with a different character, and wabi is harder to translate but something similar like feeling lonely, deserted with a grain of longing and romance in it, I have no time to go back through the posts but I think you (?) explained it well above, anyway, something like natural simplicity but behind it a very high form of cultural development that has been 'mastered' and thereby overcome. The expression was very much influenced by Zen and also tea-masters like Sen no Rikkyu. Wabi-sabi in this form isn't or 'wasn't' -cause I'm not up to date anymore-, as such in the bigger dictionaries like the Kenkyuusha. But as an aesthetic concept every Japanese knows it, he just doesn't throw it around every day. My hometown is Vienna, btw. :)
     
  8. Hayward

    Hayward Senior member

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    Wabisabi is best understood as the aesthetic equivalent of genteel poverty.
     
  9. lefty

    lefty Senior member

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    Thread needs more wabi, less sabi.

    lefty
     
  10. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

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    And a three-drink minimum.
     
  11. Fuuma

    Fuuma Senior member

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    Thread has gotten very reassuring for everyone's aesthetic judgment as even the owners of the interiors posted know they're awful.
     
  12. Bounder

    Bounder Senior member

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    Yeah, I think this is important. My understanding is that it contains the idea that you have "transcended" the gaudy and the flashy. This goes especially to the "wabi" part. (As I said, I find the sabi part a little more difficult to fully appreciate.) To try to translate it into "Western" terms, the idea is "refined" taste in that you can appreciate the beauty and perfection in simplicity. Intellectually, this makes a certain amount of sense to me. If you are in an environment with a million things going on and a million things to see, it is hard to appreciate anything. If you can concentrate on one thing, especially a perfect and/or beautiful thing, you can study it and learn to truly appreciate it. It's the difference between running through a museum and studying a painting.

    See, I was going to guess Vienna. And then I thought, "Everybody guesses Vienna. It's always Austria, Austria, Austria. Let's give the poor Czechs a look in."



    I don't think that's quite it. For one thing, the concept is choosing harmony and simplicity. So it isn't so much being poor as an emphasis on quality over quantity. I don't think it is impossible for the poor to reach the "wabi sabi" ideal but being poor alone, even if you are genteel isn't really it. As I understand it, the ideal practitioner is someone who could do whatever they want but has gotten to a place where they are choosing "wabi'. Once again, I find the sabi thing more complicated.
     
  13. Bounder

    Bounder Senior member

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    Now Fuuma, don't be that way. I wouldn't say yours was awful. The coffee mugs were really nice.
     
  14. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

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    I took the imperfect part of 'wabi-sabi' as an endearment of slight flaws which are part of the result of building something and the development of character through as materials age.

    The pursuit of perfection all while understanding that it will never actually be achieved.
     
  15. Bounder

    Bounder Senior member

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    If I could figure out what they mean, I think I'd agree with you.



    I find this kind of useful.

    The sabi part has been explained to me as originally something that evoked a sort of wistful melancholy e.g. "Oh, that sunset was so beautiful. Now it's gone forever!" As I understand it, this is why ikebana is sabi. "The flowers are so beautiful! They're all gonna die so soon!" But over time, it became something more positive, I think, at least in part, along the lines of what you are suggesting, SG.

    I think part of it is also the idea that there are layers of "perfection". So an old teapot may still be a perfect teapot even though it has "flaws." Like shoes, age and use give it a patina that makes it more interesting and more unique. Or something.

    SG, do you find that you use these concepts yourself? For example, when you are restoring antiques, do you try to make them "perfect" or do you somehow try and retain their "character" or whatever we are calling it.
     
  16. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    This reads like somebody trying to deal with his own OCD.
     
  17. Bounder

    Bounder Senior member

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    Is OCD a topic you really want to raise in one of Foo's threads?
     
    2 people like this.
  18. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

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    I build new peices rather than restore antiques, so it's not a perfect comparison. I avoid having antiques restored unless they are in desperate need of it because I think something is lost when they are fully restored. I do think they should be kept in working order

    I pursue perfection in each step of the process, but I will ultimetly produce something that represents my insight and abilities at the time.
     
  19. Fuuma

    Fuuma Senior member

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  20. Hayward

    Hayward Senior member

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    Thanks for posting this. It explains my "genteel poverty" reference.

    "Wabi" on its own is simplicity. "Wabi" with "Sabi" denotes simplicity combined with an appreciated and gradual degradation in the way we differentiate "patina" from "rust."

    Both can be taken to extremes, which in itself can become pretentious.
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2013

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