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Apartment foo-nishing

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by mafoofan, Jun 16, 2013.

  1. zalb916

    zalb916 Senior member

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    And this is all largely irrelevant. Foo's joke/point was that he critiqued my table without even seeing it. My table could be hideous and constructed so poorly that it's impossible to rest a cup of coffee on it without spilling. The story or uniqueness behind my table may be interesting to a few people, but what's more relevant is how well is it crafted and how does the piece look and function in the space.
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2013
  2. Loathing

    Loathing Senior member

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    Jokes aside, the lighting is really bad in Foo's room. Both lights in that picture are dysfunctional by my standards.

    I still don't understand the Cappellini vase. Useless for holding any real flowers, and I hate its pomo "concept". If it's intended to be purely ornamental, couldn't you find anything better than that? I'd buy a Song Dynasty vase in celadon or white, with a crackled glaze.

    The aeriums on the wall don't make sense to me either: why separate the plant life in your room into little samples, and then wall-mount them in goldfish bowls? The wall has this sort of amateur-botanist's pseudo-laboratory look which does not appeal to me. I can understand the practical reason of saving space; but it doesn't take a genius to figure out a more conventional way of getting a plant into that room.

    Otherwise, the sofa/rug/table/chair look nice to me.
     
  3. Big A

    Big A Senior member

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    Nah, it's just the yuppies in the Bay Area going apoplectic because they'll never be able to verify Muir's contention that HH is more beautiful than Yosemite. It happens every time there's a big fire Or a bunch of people get hantavirus
     
  4. imatlas

    imatlas Senior member

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    His joke was that there was no need for him to see it. It could be beautiful and perfect of both form and function, and it would still be awful, because you did not buy it in an Italian design showroom in Manhattan.
     
  5. Bounder

    Bounder Senior member

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    Unless it is a carpet.

    :confused:
     
  6. Cantabrigian

    Cantabrigian Senior member

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    This thread is like Syria.

    I have no idea who the good guys are.
     
    6 people like this.
  7. mafoofan

    mafoofan Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    No.

    The joke is that how one values the story behind zbromer's table depends entirely on the particular person. There is nothing about having a "story" that makes the table a better table--certainly not aesthetically, and from a personal, sentimental perspective, it can actually be detrimental. For example, as a conservative captialist, I attribute negative value to his table's hippie-dippie orgin.

    I don't understand the fixation on "authenticity." It is no different than the fixation in MC on finding one's "personal style," and strikes me as highly insecure. I am confident that my choices are as authentic to myself as possible, since they are choices I have made and am comfortable with. The addition of a "story" does not make those choices any more or less my own--they only provide fodder for mindless dinner conversation and will only impress the sorts of people I have no interest in impressing. Actually, I would consider it a great defeat if those sorts of people, who care about "stories" and "authenticity" as contrived in this discussion, do like my furniture.
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2013
  8. zalb916

    zalb916 Senior member

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    I can't speak for him, but that's not at all what he was saying. It's a narrative that people are trying to force upon him.
     
  9. mafoofan

    mafoofan Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    No.

    The monetary value of that particular rug depends on its provenance, history, etc. I only care about the "story" insofar as it impacts the price I have paid. I don't mind saying that I prefer to pay less, rather than more, for the same thing.

    I hope that isn't too vulgar for impressionable iGent ears.
     
  10. imatlas

    imatlas Senior member

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    You were the first to raise authenticity as a value.
     
  11. mafoofan

    mafoofan Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    The sort of authenticity I value is not the sort others are talking about.

    I value when things actually are what they purport to be. That is the authenticity I care about. If I am going to buy a Beni Ourain rug, I want it to be a genuine Beni Ourain rug.

    You and others are describing an entirely different concept: wherein an object can be more or less "authentic" relative to the owner, depending on the process by which he has come into its possession. That sort of authenticity is meaningless to me.
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2013
  12. A Y

    A Y Senior member

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    What would be the red line?
     
    1 person likes this.
  13. imatlas

    imatlas Senior member

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    Yes, I know what you mean by authentic. You mean it in terms of "authorized use of intellectual property" or perhaps in the case of your rug, "direct cultural transmission". I was referring to that quite specifically. The place of acquisition is relevant to you only insofar as it guarantees its "genuineness". IMO, by this very measure zbromer's table is no less "genuine" than your rug, and perhaps more so than your table, as he purchased it from the originator of the IP.
     
    2 people like this.
  14. mafoofan

    mafoofan Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    No, I meant "authenticity" exactly as I put it: being what a thing purports to be. For different things, that means different requirements. For example, in the case of a Beni Ourain rug, it matters who made the rug and where they made it. This matters much less for a Cappellini table. A Cappellini table is authentic so long as it is made by Cappellini, regardless of who precisely puts their hands on the table or where the factory is.

    I never claimed zbromer's table wasn't "authentic" under that meaning.
     
  15. Manton

    Manton Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    thread also deserves a CW strike.
     
  16. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    Just remember, Foo did not draw the red line, the thread drew the red line.
     
  17. arahat

    arahat Senior member

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    Should the barometer of authenticity not lie upon the feet on the beholder?
    The universality of textural expression and experience confirms or disputes the delights of the eye.

    Subtlety of thread, of weave and skill is lost or suffused upon one's bare soles. The breadth of one's palate is a function of experience.
     
  18. sugarbutch

    sugarbutch Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    !!!
     
  19. Dragon

    Dragon Senior member

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    The more ornate Japanese rooms (like Nijo castle and Golden Pavilion posted earlier) are actually influenced by the Chinese aesthetic. China was the leader in arts and Japanese looked up to the Chinese for inspiration. The more simple Japanese aesthetic that we imagine as Japanese and more minimalist now is more of an influence from some nobility and the movement created by the tea masters like Rikyu, I think. In either case, I think the space itself was always quite minimalist. The people were always the center of attention and the rooms were created to harmonize or make the people stand out as the most important part of the room.
     
  20. Journeyman

    Journeyman Senior member

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    +1. There was a definite move towards austerity and asceticism in design from about the early 1500s onwards.

    Interestingly, a lot of older Japanese temples, that now have a lovely, aged appearance and are just made from plain, undecorated wood, were originally very colourful as, when they were first built, they were painted in a variety of bright colours in the Chinese style.

    Parts of the Tosho-gu complex at Nikko are still painted, as they would originally have been, in bright colours, and it's quite interested to see them in their original state. However, I must say that I prefer the simple, wooden look which prevails now, partially as a result of ageing and partially as a result of the shift towards austerity and asceticism.

    Historical records, as well as some photos and pictures from the late 19th century, indicate that whilst Kinkaku-ji - the Temple of the Golden Pavilion - was originally covered (or at least partially covered) in gold leaf when it was first built in the late 1300s, it was pretty much devoid of gold leaf in the late 19th century and that when it was rebuilt after the fire in the 1950s, there was considerably more gold leaf and lacquer used in the reconstruction than had been used in the original structure!
     

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