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Apartment foo-nishing

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by mafoofan, Jun 16, 2013.

  1. imatlas

    imatlas Senior member

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    Straight up GF? It's honestly tacky. Not that there's anything wrong with that. It's also too small for the wall.


    That's really up to Mr. and Mrs. Foo to decide, isn't it? I think that Foo is capable of expressing idiosyncracy in the most subtle of ways, if you didn't get that already from my comments.


    Maybe not for you, but it certainly is for Foo. How many threads does it really take to decorate Foo's apartment, after all? I mean, it's easy to say "it's just furniture, how much does it really say", but that seems totally antithetical to the intellectual approach that Foo claims to be taking. Of course, the fact is that he decorated it out of catalogs, showrooms and the internet in the space of less than three months, which is pretty much the opposite of carefully developing, refining and honing an aesthetic of home decor.

    BTW I'm a total schlub when it comes to decorating. Most of what my apartment says about me is "this guy is a slob and a borderline hoarder", although I am getting better. However, my belongings say a lot about me, and I like it that way. I have books, maps and art that relate to my long time interest in the arctic, some of which are souvenirs brought back from trips there. We have a dhurrie on the floor in the kitchen that my wife bought from the weaver in a village in India. I wanted to put some air-plants in the kitchen window, but instead of the hated glass balls, I made my own display from a piece of driftwood I found on a beach trip we took with my sister's family. I bought my arm chair for $10 at a tag sale and had it reupholstered. Our favorite souvenir from any trip is work by a local artist, so we enjoy the art and we enjoy the memory of the trip every time that we see it. In short, there is nothing anonymous about our space, even if it isn't yet very functional and pleasant to look at!
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2013
  2. GreenFrog

    GreenFrog Senior member

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    Oh well, at least I like it, and that's all that matters, right?
     
  3. imatlas

    imatlas Senior member

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    Do chicks dig it? That's all that really matters.
     
    2 people like this.
  4. GreenFrog

    GreenFrog Senior member

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    It gets a lot of compliments, that's for sure.

    Now whether they really dig it, who knows?

    I have another print of a beetle getting framed right now; can't wait to put it up!

    Anyway, I know jack shit about aesthetics and design, so I only put up things that I like and admire.
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2013
  5. StephenHero

    StephenHero Senior member

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    Take a raincheck on those compliments.
     
  6. GreenFrog

    GreenFrog Senior member

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    No.
     
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  7. StephenHero

    StephenHero Senior member

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    I like your chops, kid.
     
  8. sugarbutch

    sugarbutch Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    You made your point quite well, I thought, but there's a substantial difference between his clothing and his shared apartment. I didn't intend to suggest that his furnishings couldn't reflect his approach and aesthetic, more to qualify some of what you were saying with the consideration of his wife's influence on what gets put into the space. I mostly agree with you.

    GreenFrog, I think your print is "honest living" but that doesn't make it attractive. That E30 M3 is a fun car, though.
     
  9. LabelKing

    LabelKing Senior member

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    Anna dello Russo is like a stupid gay's Diana Vreeland.
     
  10. LabelKing

    LabelKing Senior member

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    Last edited: Sep 1, 2013
  11. dopey

    dopey Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Looks like Elm burl, or whatever may be the Chinese equivalent.
     
  12. imatlas

    imatlas Senior member

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    Looks like burled walnut to my untrained eye, but elm probably makes more sense. Looks great.
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2013
  13. LabelKing

    LabelKing Senior member

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    The apartment was built in the early '90s for a Japanese businessman with imported Japanese materials so it may be some sort of Japanese wood.

    It's a rather irregularly sized studio penthouse with a Japanese style bedroom so the whole place is sort of open-planned.

    Might also be bird's eye maple. I'm sure those walls cost a lot.
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2013
    1 person likes this.
  14. Journeyman

    Journeyman Senior member

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    LK, dare I ask what you're actually holding in that photo??
     
  15. LabelKing

    LabelKing Senior member

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    1 person likes this.
  16. LabelKing

    LabelKing Senior member

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  17. Journeyman

    Journeyman Senior member

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  18. StephenHero

    StephenHero Senior member

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    My guess on the wood is burled Japanese maple. The smaller knots in close proximity suggests a smaller variety than North American maples, and the relative lack of rings suggests it's less likely to be walnut. Elm would be my second guess, but elm also has more distinct rings than this wall. But yeah, those walls must have cost a fortune.
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2013
  19. LabelKing

    LabelKing Senior member

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    Even a veneer would cost a lot?

    I think there are about 15 panels in total plus smaller ones that are actually invisible hinged cabinets.
     
  20. StephenHero

    StephenHero Senior member

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    Well, if it's Japanese maple, the trunks are typically so asymmetrical that it makes the process of shaving a veneer off so difficult, because there just isn't enough wood in a straight vertical section to get much sq. footage. You need a really aged tree ($$$$) to get a large piece. These panels might even be bigger than the size of what a normal Japanese maple can give you, so they may have had to laminate multiple sections on top of each other to create a panel. The profiling of the walls is a bit hard to decipher from the photos, but if a straight and large section of another tree specimen were used, it would be more likely to see much more repetition in the burl because they could shave larger sections off the trunk off in one piece. If it is Japanese maple, that would cost a whole lot. There's also a bunch of waste in the process usually, because there's little room for error in application and you may have to start all over if you screw up on one panel so that you're not using contrasting specimens.
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2013

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