1. Styleforum Gives - Holiday Charity Auction 11: Any Three (3) Customized Ties from Vanda Fine Clothing

    We are very proud to present this year's edition of the Styleforum Holiday Charity Auctions, this year in support of the Ronald McDonald House Charities of Spokane (www.rmhcspokane.org). Each Auction lasts 24 hours. Please follow and bid on all the auctions.

    The 11th auction of the year is for any three customized ties from Vanda Fine Clothing. Please bid often and generously here

    Fok and the Styleforum Team.

    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice

STYLE. COMMUNITY. GREAT CLOTHING.

Bored of counting likes on social networks? At Styleforum, you’ll find rousing discussions that go beyond strings of emojis.

Click Here to join Styleforum's thousands of style enthusiasts today!

Anyone know anything about Sulka Suits?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Bartames, Apr 12, 2005.

  1. Ambulance Chaser

    Ambulance Chaser Distinguished Member

    Messages:
    9,956
    Likes Received:
    1,068
    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2002
    Location:
    Washington, D.C.
    I assume that you're still in DC.  I think Field would probably do a very good job of shortening the sleeve from the shoulder, but I'd like to get the opinion of manton, kabert, and other Field patrons on this issue.

    The shoulders seem a bit wide for 42R, but that may just be the cut of the suit.
     


  2. RJman

    RJman Posse Member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    18,647
    Likes Received:
    103
    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2004
    Location:
    Garak's Clothiers
    Originally Posted by RJMan,April 12 2005,14:51
    Saks and Wilkes Bashford had Cifonelli around that time as well. Â However, it did not at all resemble the Cifonelli garments I saw in Paris at the rue Marbeuf boutique, not even the label.
    Do tell about the Cifonelli garments you saw in Paris. [​IMG]
    Well, gather round, chillun. Â It was back in aught-two, in the mid-summer. Â Suits were British-influenced with slant pockets and waisting, RTW around 2000 euros. Â The shirts were very Etro-looking and around the same price as Etro. BTW, johnapril, davidphenry.com has that photographer's images of the Cifonelli shop and the Corthay boutique, as well as other beautiful pictures of Paree.
     


  3. lisapop

    lisapop Senior Member

    Messages:
    534
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2005
    Shortening the sleeves through the shoulder would be the best approach.  Truth be told, this method doesn't always produce optimal results as the curvature in the sleeve will have been changed slightly, which could affect how smoothly the sleeve falls on your arms.  But, if the suit is a steal, you might need to accept such potential compromises, which might be minor at worst and unnoticeable at best.
    Grayson
     


  4. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    41,574
    Likes Received:
    2,820
    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2002
    Location:
    In Hiding
    I don't know what is meant by "recreating the buttonholes." Â Once cut, they are cut. Â They're not like tiny little moth holes which can be rewoven. Shortening the sleeves at the shoulders has lot of complications. Â The most serious, I think, is that sleeves are cut with a deliberate taper. Â On most coats, the widest part is the top, the sleevehead, where fullness adds comfort and mobility. Â Raising the sleeves at the shoulder necessarily means that a narrow part of the sleeve will become the sleevehead. Â The result might be less comfortable and more restrictive. Â This is not necessarily so; but it's worth raising with the tailor, just to be safe.
     


  5. uriahheep

    uriahheep Senior Member

    Messages:
    265
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2005
    I find it odd that Sulka would have ever had its shirts made by St. Andrews, for St. Andrews has its shirts (at least MTM) made by Burini, a shirt company owned by Brioni.
     


  6. Bartames

    Bartames Member

    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2004
    I guess I meant that if in the shortening process some holes were removed, you'd have to create new ones. This, as I understand it, is not something every tailor can pull off.  However, it could a better option than shortening at the armholes?
     


  7. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    41,574
    Likes Received:
    2,820
    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2002
    Location:
    In Hiding
    The problem is, you can't close the existing holes. They are too big, and too much cloth has been cut out.
     


  8. Bartames

    Bartames Member

    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2004
    Ahhh...I see you're point, so if you shortened the sleeves that much, the open holes new location would be down towards the end of the cuff and there is no way to "move" those holes up to their normal position (i.e. close them up and make new ones).  So I guess the only option then is shortening at the armhole.  Thanks
     


  9. johnapril

    johnapril Distinguished Member

    Messages:
    5,664
    Likes Received:
    7
    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2004
    (johnapril @ April 13 2005,05:58)
    Saks and Wilkes Bashford had Cifonelli around that time as well. Â However, it did not at all resemble the Cifonelli garments I saw in Paris at the rue Marbeuf boutique, not even the label.
    Do tell about the Cifonelli garments you saw in Paris. [​IMG]
    Well, gather round, chillun. Â It was back in aught-two, in the mid-summer. Â Suits were British-influenced with slant pockets and waisting, RTW around 2000 euros. Â The shirts were very Etro-looking and around the same price as Etro. BTW, johnapril, davidphenry.com has that photographer's images of the Cifonelli shop and the Corthay boutique, as well as other beautiful pictures of Paree.
    I will have to check that stuff out. I did see phenry's site. I will check out Corthay as well. Thanx.
     


  10. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    41,574
    Likes Received:
    2,820
    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2002
    Location:
    In Hiding
    I would not call Cifonelli "British". Yes, they like pockets slanted at absurd angles, but that is not really British. The waist is definitely different than any English waist: much longer, but not curved and tapered like a Neapolitan waist, but more "columnar." They look like Ratpack suits to me, only with wider lapels. And slant pockets.
     


  11. RJman

    RJman Posse Member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    18,647
    Likes Received:
    103
    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2004
    Location:
    Garak's Clothiers
    I fear I have incurred the annoyance of the Manton.

    I was trying to remember if the suits had that Continental (Frog) columnar waist and couldn't recollect. At the time I thought the details indicated that Cifonelli was following the trend for British styling which was in vogue at the time -- Etro was making hacking-type suits too. That was in my pre-Manton phase.
     


  12. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    41,574
    Likes Received:
    2,820
    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2002
    Location:
    In Hiding
    It takes much, much more that clothing disagreements to annoy me.
     


  13. johnapril

    johnapril Distinguished Member

    Messages:
    5,664
    Likes Received:
    7
    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2004
    Manton, please define "Ratpack suits."
     


  14. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    41,574
    Likes Received:
    2,820
    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2002
    Location:
    In Hiding
    Lean silhouette, almost straight-sided. Raised and built-out yet sloped and somewhat soft shoulder. Low waist and button point. Narrow lapels. Small pocket flaps (if any). Front buttons close togther. Close skirt. No vents. Belt-rise trousers, preferably flat-front. Straight legs or at most the barest hint of a taper. No cuffs.
     


  15. johnapril

    johnapril Distinguished Member

    Messages:
    5,664
    Likes Received:
    7
    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2004
    Manton, is the look you describe the way French suits are cut? I am only familiar with Italian tailoring, though as I am heading for Paris this spring, I'm trying to pinpoint the sorts of things I want to look for. French handmade shoes--that's a no-brainer. Not sure about other sartorial traditions.

    Anyone?
     


Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by