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Anyone Ever Used "AuctionSniper.com"

Discussion in 'B&S Archive' started by Augusto86, Sep 29, 2006.

  1. Buster

    Buster Senior member

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    Because it prevents a bidding war from breaking out.

    Without sniping, someone puts in their max bid, say $100. They get out bid and price is now $101. Suddenly, the item that was only worth $100 to the original buyer may now be worth more. The thought process moves away from the total cost of the item to the incremental cost of winning the auction. Thus, if the item was worth bidding on, it surely is worth another $2 to get it. Moreover, watching the auction over a period of days may increase the desire for the item further justifying an additional bid.

    With sniping, the original buyer never gets a chance to increase the original bid and thus the purchase price stays lower than it might have otherwise.

    On the other hand (there's always another hand), the prevalence of sniping may result in higher prices because you have to truly put in your max bid to make sure you don't lose to another sniper because you don't have the chance to rebid as you would without sniping. For example, there is a pair of Alden suede chukkas (size 7D) [blatant attempt to prevent other SF members from bidding against me] that I'd really like. I put in my snipe bid when they were first listed. I've subsequently increased the amount of my bid even though there is only one low bid on the item because I don't want to lose these to another sniper (at least at a price between by original snipe and my increased price).

    I think sniping may create the appearance of lower prices, but I'm not sure if it's really true.



    It is very simple - in a perfectly rational world (in which all the bidders are rational) - there is no difference whether people snipe or not. Auction theory predicts that the guy for which the item is most valueable will win with the highest bid.
    However, since we are not in such a world, we observe these bidding wars which in many cases result in what is referred to as "winner's curse" and other irrational behaviors (all of which benefit the seller)
    By using a snipper you make sure that you are rational, as well as making sure that the other rational people around don't get any leads for bidding wars.
     
  2. DNW

    DNW Senior member

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    It is very simple - in a perfectly rational world (in which all the bidders are rational) - there is no difference whether people snipe or not. Auction theory predicts that the guy for which the item is most valueable will win with the highest bid.
    However, since we are not in such a world, we observe these bidding wars which in many cases result in what is referred to as "winner's curse" and other irrational behaviors (all of which benefit the seller)
    By using a snipper you make sure that you are rational, as well as making sure that the other rational people around don't get any leads for bidding wars.


    You sound like an economist.

    I use a sniper because it removes the emotion from bidding. I set the auction price when I am deciding with the clock running. For the most part, I am rational when I set the price. Sellers would not want sniping because, as stated, it removes the potential extra money they would've received when people get in a bidding war. I have no sympathy for this because any extra money they get from a bidding war is windfall anyway. The other reason is that if an auction closes in the middle of the day and I'm in class, I can still bid on it and get a good price. I don't want to reveal all my cards until the last minute. Lastly, many people are using it, so it's just the natural progression of competition.
     
  3. javyn

    javyn Senior member

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    I think I am missing something here...I snipe but don't use one of these programs. I have one browser tab open on the item's listing, constantly reloading the page to keep up with the time. On the other browser tab, I have it at the last step before placing the bid, the click here to confirm your bid. As soon as the clock gets down to 5 or 10 seconds, I switch over to the confirm bid tab and place my bid.
     
  4. rnoldh

    rnoldh Senior member

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    I think I am missing something here...I snipe but don't use one of these programs. I have one browser tab open on the item's listing, constantly reloading the page to keep up with the time. On the other browser tab, I have it at the last step before placing the bid, the click here to confirm your bid. As soon as the clock gets down to 5 or 10 seconds, I switch over to the confirm bid tab and place my bid.

    You are sniping! But you are doing it manually. This thread has been discussing Sniping Programs that do it automatically. The advantage is that the snipe will go through, even when you are not on the computer.

    I have tried to snipe manually too. And many times the bid will not go through at the very end of the auction. Also, by sniping automatically, you are taking the emotion out of the auction. Theoretically, with Snipe Programs, you can set up your Snipe with your maximum bid, and then forget about it. This is preferable to watching the auction till the last minute and then sniping manually. That way there's a good chance you might get caught in a bidding war or bid more than you initially wanted to, when the auction was listed.
     
  5. Cuff Link

    Cuff Link Well-Known Member

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    I have used auctionsniper.com for several years. It is great for me since I don't have to remember when to bid. I set my maximum amount and forget it. I don't get into bidding wars.


    Cuff
     
  6. javyn

    javyn Senior member

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    ahh i see. thanks i'll check it out then.
     
  7. Augusto86

    Augusto86 Senior member

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    I definitely have been screwed in bidding wars, although more often I am the one pushing the price up 100s of dollars and then pulling out. [​IMG] [​IMG] I got auctionsniper for 2 reasons - 1, I literally used to get breathless with my heart pounding as the auction ended, which struck me as ridiculous, and 2 - I'm too busy to sit like that for all the auctions I want, especially overseas ones.
     
  8. johnpemberton

    johnpemberton Senior member

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    Well - I will spell it out to you - seller dont like it, as generally the final price is a lot lower than would be achieved if it was a standard auction...i thought that was quite obvious???

    Buyer like it, as they can set the price they want to pay, without other buyers seeing the general trend of the auction price....its a lot easier to buy for a low price.

    e.g. I bought an immaculate & genuine Hugo Boss suit for £7.26 last week, by sniping.


    Why would a seller hate it if it sends the price of their auction up during the last seconds?

    Why would buyers (who don't use it) like it if sends the price of their auction up during the last seconds?
     
  9. dah328

    dah328 Senior member

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    If anyone knows of a freeware program that works even if you are not on-line, please post it's name.
    That's not physically possible. Not online = no way to transmit bid to ebay.
     
  10. Rolo

    Rolo Senior member

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    Well - I will spell it out to you - seller dont like it, as generally the final price is a lot lower than would be achieved if it was a standard auction...i thought that was quite obvious???

    Buyer like it, as they can set the price they want to pay, without other buyers seeing the general trend of the auction price....its a lot easier to buy for a low price.

    e.g. I bought an immaculate & genuine Hugo Boss suit for £7.26 last week, by sniping.


    I'm still not certain that sniping does anything but impact those few auctions where a bidding war MIGHT have broken out.

    Sellers are not the only people who hate sniping. The most vocal opponents of sniping are the buyers that don't use a sniping services. Why do they complain? Because they lose to snipers. And, why do they lose to snipers? Because they bid at a lower maximum price than that which sniper was willing to pay.

    Note that the eBay's "maximum bid" system prevents snipers from having any real advantage because someone who placed a conventional bid at a higher maximum price than the sniper will still win the auction. Accordingly, the complaints from buyers about sniping are complaints about not maximizing the price to the seller. Sniping appears to benefit the sellers in such instances.

    There are some verying interesting academic articles being published regarding eBay auctions. I haven't seen any regarding sniping, but there I read one recently that focused on the impact of the opening price and final price. For items that could expect bids from a number of sellers, price was maximized with a low opening price. For items expecting little traffic, a high opening price was necessary.
     
  11. Rolo

    Rolo Senior member

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    e.g. I bought an immaculate & genuine Hugo Boss suit for £7.26 last week, by sniping.

    While you may have used a sniping service for this item, I would suggest that the low price resulted from a lack of other bidders rather than from the sniping itself.
     
  12. shoreman1782

    shoreman1782 Senior member

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    What happens if two people, using the same snipe service, bid on a single item? Does the person with the highest max bid automatically win? What if two people have the same max bid? Is this a stupid question? Just trying to figure it out.
     
  13. Rolo

    Rolo Senior member

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    What happens if two people, using the same snipe service, bid on a single item? Does the person with the highest max bid automatically win? What if two people have the same max bid? Is this a stupid question? Just trying to figure it out.

    From eBay's point of few, if both snipers bid the same amount, the earlier bid wins.

    How an individual sniping services deals with this, I have no idea, but it would depend on how the sniping software was written.
     
  14. rnoldh

    rnoldh Senior member

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    That's not physically possible. Not online = no way to transmit bid to ebay.

    I don't think you understand what I was asking.

    I have downloaded Jbidwatcher, and it works fine. But, I must be on-line for the snipe that I have set up, to be placed by Jbidwatcher. If I'm not on-line the snipe will not go through.

    This is different from the other sniping services discussed. For instance, I also have an account with auctionstealer.com. With this service, I can set up my snipe and forget about it. Wheather I am on-line or off, the snipe will be placed. So, I guess the snipe is set up on auctionstealer's server and then placed from there.

    What I was wondering is if there is a free service such as Jbidwatcher that will place a snipe(that I have set up), wheather or not I am on-line?
     
  15. Wade M

    Wade M Senior member

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    While you may have used a sniping service for this item, I would suggest that the low price resulted from a lack of other bidders rather than from the sniping itself.

    I think this is a point many overlook. I totally agree with all your points on Snipping [​IMG]

    I've got a very paranoid theory that eBay is actually behind all the sniping servers.....People are now paying for the right to bid. They never bid more then their maximum bid anyhow, but now they pay for that right. Hello income on the bid, income on the seller's total amount, which now instead of testing the waters the day before will always be the outright maximum of the buyer.

    --Wade
     
  16. mack11211

    mack11211 Senior member

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    Alas, yes.

    Part of the job of being the most effective seller is having the nerve to set opening bids as low as possible. As a seller, I am only gradually learning this.

    For ex, my Poole suit has only gotten its first bid in the 6th day of a 7 day auction. Opening bid was 100. Of course, many people are watching it and the bidding may rise to a few hundred dollars at the close. But if I had started the auction at a penny, it might have risen higher, earlier.
     
  17. dah328

    dah328 Senior member

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    There are some verying interesting academic articles being published regarding eBay auctions. I haven't seen any regarding sniping, but there I read one recently that focused on the impact of the opening price and final price. For items that could expect bids from a number of sellers, price was maximized with a low opening price. For items expecting little traffic, a high opening price was necessary.
    That's interesting. Are those articles available online? I doubt I've sold enough items to constitute a significant sample size, but last week, for example, I sold four pairs of brand new EG shoes. All had an opening bid of $399 and a BIN price of $499. One sold for the BIN price, one sold for $399, one sold for $560 and the last sold for $480. All in all, it's hard to draw any conclusions based on that experience.

    dan
     
  18. Wade M

    Wade M Senior member

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    That's interesting. Are those articles available online? I doubt I've sold enough items to constitute a significant sample size, but last week, for example, I sold four pairs of brand new EG shoes. All had an opening bid of $399 and a BIN price of $499. One sold for the BIN price, one sold for $399, one sold for $560 and the last sold for $480. All in all, it's hard to draw any conclusions based on that experience.

    dan


    Not really, it's actually very logical when you take into consideration the pool of potential buyers, their pre-conseved value of shoe, their reactions to time between bids, reaction to final purchase and price paid, hype generated from price, and the order that they were sold in. You will see a very clear, logical pattern.

    --Wade
     
  19. EL72

    EL72 Senior member

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    How an individual sniping services deals with this, I have no idea, but it would depend on how the sniping software was written.

    The one service I have used deals with this issue by giving precedence to whomever entered the snipe bid first, assuming they are the same.
     
  20. horton

    horton Senior member

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    Not really, it's actually very logical when you take into consideration the pool of potential buyers, their pre-conseved value of shoe, their reactions to time between bids, reaction to final purchase and price paid, hype generated from price, and the order that they were sold in. You will see a very clear, logical pattern.

    --Wade


    I've also often thought that the BIN price was essentially a form of "anchoring" so that any price below anchor again seemed like a deal (as is the listing of suggested full retail price).
     

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