anyone ever use tom fords mtm program?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by AvariceBespoke, Nov 16, 2008.

  1. teddieriley

    teddieriley Senior member

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    Wait, you smell that?
    where do i buy this and how much?

    Probably the same as a down payment on a car.
     
  2. TheFusilliJerry

    TheFusilliJerry Senior member

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    THIS IS NOT STYLEFORUM APPROVED THINKING!!

    occasionally people come along who do not subscribe to sf groupthink. I think you have some experience in this area.
     
  3. mmkn

    mmkn Senior member

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    I think you have some experience in this area.

    Hey, don't knock the Jil Sander worshiper! [​IMG]

    Jil was uncompromising in her ways with fabric and design, at the expense of mo' money, and there's nothing wrong with that . . . or worshiping that . . .

    - M
     
  4. A Harris

    A Harris Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I have to admit, I just looked at some QoS pics and the tailoring wasn't as dramatic as I recalled. But there's at least one suit with crazy pagoda shoulders -- it made an impression because it just seemed ridiculous.

    I didn't find them THAT flashy in the movie either. The cut was dramatic enough to make me notice a bit but I doubt anyone else did.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Roikins

    Roikins Senior member

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    where do i buy this and how much?
    And it might be generically known as a "funnel neck coat." I've never heard that term, so I don't know if that's just a name Marks & Spencer attached to it, or if it's a legit term for that type of neck. There's also once that's close to the Tom Ford model by Ted Baker, but on sale for about $250.
     
  6. Sator

    Sator Senior member

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    The most "Fordesque" suit to get is from Bill Fioravanti in NY. That is and has been his signature look since the 60's. His suit will make Ford's look like Brooks Brothers. Bill is also the best fitter I know. If you do go with Ford, it is still MTM and you are prone to the largest margin of error of getting it right. You also need the body proportion to pull that styling off and bring out the full expression of the cut. I first got into tailoring in 1972 and the look for men was high concave shoulders, high armholes, jackets fitted very close to the body. I liked this look and have made plenty of built up concave shoulders. Then SF told me it was a dated uncool look. That shoulder is very difficult to make. Much harder than an unpadded shoulder. Few can do it well or do it at all. When done in a factory it is more a product of the pressing equipment used. Lou Myles was excellent at executing this shoulder/ look but unfortunately, not in business any more.
    At last some sanity to this thread! Thank you so much for posting that. What it goes to show is that when you bespeak an order of a cutter you are commissioning him to draft a pattern to have made up. Any professional cutter adept at pattern making should be able to have sufficient pattern manipulation skills to draft a pattern according to his standard system and then add changes according to fashion. Even I can do it. It takes me endless hour upon hour to do it, but a professional should be able to do it much more adroitly than I. When I see a coat these days I can close my eyes and imagine how the pattern would look and how it was drafted. These people who say "stick to the cookie cutter house style, as deviation from it will result in utter catastrophe" really are too anxious, and mistrustful of their cutter's pattern manipulation skills. The point is that this internet dogma about having to choose a house style into which you will fit is a myth. It should be the other way around. With bespoke, the coat fits you, not you the coat! However, most people these days are so set in the RTW mentality of finding coats that fit them but they unable to escape the mind set. That said, certain larger houses are particularly dogmatic about forcing their "house style" onto both the cutters in their employment as well their customers. I also accept that there may be cutters and tailors out their who aren't good enough to manipulate patterns (they will have to be pretty dodgy to be that bad). Also, pattern manipulation takes time and a fair bit of mental effort. In a busy cutting room, the line of least resistance is towards less manipulation beyond the basic draft. The point is that it is not true that if you want a particular style dictated by fashion, that you have to find someone who makes that as their "house style" to avoid complete disaster. A good bespoke cutter and tailor should not only be able to equal the creation of TF/Zegna for any film, but surpass it.
     
  7. AvariceBespoke

    AvariceBespoke Senior member

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    Probably the same as a down payment on a car.

    i put down 30,000 USD when i bought my car last feb. that's a lot for a jacket!
     
  8. yfyf

    yfyf Affiliate vendor Affiliate Vendor

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    [​IMG]
    - B


    An interesting detail that I've only seen Ramroop do is the double triangle pockets that form a square. Does anyone know if it was his invention? I took a picture of a jacket with the same detail in Maurice Sedgewell's / Ramroop's window.
     
  9. mmkn

    mmkn Senior member

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    [​IMG]
    - B


    Funny . . . the more I look at this picture the more I think, even with the hair, that suit could pass as stylish to me today EXCEPT for the violation of Flusser's second pillar of timeless fashion - proportion of the lapels relative to shoulder . . . and I can't even pass the lapels as being swoopingly dramatic as some of Tom Ford's. Everything else is what I might admire (even the shoulders) today.

    The first pillar, IRRC, was color.

    - M
     
  10. yfyf

    yfyf Affiliate vendor Affiliate Vendor

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    Funny . . . the more I look at this picture the more I think, even with the hair, that suit could pass as stylish to me today EXCEPT for the violation of Flusser's second pillar of timeless fashion - proportion of the lapels relative to shoulder . . . and I can't even pass the lapels as being swoopingly dramatic as some of Tom Ford's. Everything else is what I might admire (even the shoulders) today.

    The first pillar, IRRC, was color.

    - M


    I actually like the lapels, especially with the hair.
     
  11. dopey

    dopey Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    An interesting detail that I've only seen Ramroop do is the double triangle pockets that form a square. Does anyone know if it was his invention? I took a picture of a jacket with the same detail in Maurice Sedgewell's / Ramroop's window.
    He told me it was. He was quite proud of it, but apropos this thread and Tom Brown, there is very little really new in tailoring. Just because Ramroop thought of this himself doesn't mean no one else had thought of it also.
     
  12. yfyf

    yfyf Affiliate vendor Affiliate Vendor

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    He told me it was. He was quite proud of it, but apropos this thread and Tom Brown, there is very little really new in tailoring. Just because Ramroop thought of this himself doesn't mean no one else had thought of it also.

    Well I've never seen that pocket formation in any other non-Ramroop garment but I do find it a nice detail. Even if someone may have done it before, if Ramroop didn't know about it then hey, at least he's coming up with new stuff! [​IMG]
     
  13. dopey

    dopey Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I should have been more careful - as far as I know, Ramroop is the only one doing this. I just meant that the particular detail is not earth-shatteringly brilliant or innovative and it is possible that more than one person has tried it. Another thing Ramroop likes to do is cut the breast pocket sloping down and away from the center.
     
  14. Despos

    Despos Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Sorry, sorry... you spoke French, I misunderstood.

    Sorry, sorry walloon not flemmish, I misunderstood[​IMG]
     
  15. vitaminc

    vitaminc Senior member

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    The point is that this internet dogma about having to choose a house style into which you will fit is a myth. It should be the other way around. With bespoke, the coat fits you, not you the coat! However, most people these days are so set in the RTW mentality of finding coats that fit them but they unable to escape the mind set.

    I believe you have mistaken. The "fit" should mean "suitable and appropriate" instead of "correct sizing". For example, I wouldn't for once imagine myself in Thom Brown's BB Black Fleece for which I will look ridiculous in disregarding the fit.

    And that is why most bespoke tragedies on this forum happened.

    The point is that it is not true that if you want a particular style dictated by fashion, that you have to find someone who makes that as their "house style" to avoid complete disaster. A good bespoke cutter and tailor should not only be able to equal the creation of TF/Zegna for any film, but surpass it.

    A copy will always remain a copy. All the flaws and imperfections are what made suit-making an art.
     

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