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anyone ever use tom fords mtm program?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by AvariceBespoke, Nov 16, 2008.

  1. DocHolliday

    DocHolliday Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    This thread has now entered stage III, in which those who have not weighed in previously complain about the conversation before proceeding to extend said conversation.
     


  2. AvariceBespoke

    AvariceBespoke Senior member

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    Tom Ford, Post-Gucci, Takes A Vested Interest in Menswear

    By Robin Givhan
    Washington Post Staff Writer
    Tuesday, April 10, 2007; C01



    NEW YORK, April 9 -- Designer Tom Ford has returned to the fashion spotlight with a menswear collection. His successful revitalization of Gucci in the 1990s sparked an industry-wide rampage to resuscitate other dowager brands and pushed clothing toward a hypersexual aesthetic.

    Now he wants to make the man in the gray flannel suit the star of the menswear industry. He's fetishizing functional buttonholes on jacket sleeves. He's got a tie silhouette named after Prince Michael of Kent for a fella who wants a knot as big as a child's fist. He's got a top hat in his display case.

    The Tom Ford brand is a partnership with financial wizard Domenico de Sole. Over the course of a decade, the two masterminded the transformation of Gucci Group from a single brand teetering on the brink of disaster into a conglomerate that now includes Stella McCartney, Balenciaga and Yves Saint Laurent. The pair's departure from Gucci in 2004 signified the end of an era of rapid expansion by fashion companies.

    During his tenure at Gucci, Ford once noted that the essence of his job was to know what consumers wanted before they could even imagine it. He led the way in reviving logos, low-slung boot-cut trousers, embellished sportswear and a slithering disco sensuality.

    A larger-than-life personality who used his charm to woo media and customers alike, Ford was one of the few designers with star power to rival that of the Hollywood celebrities he dressed.

    On Monday, fashion's oracle unveiled his collection of men's ready-to-wear, his made-to-measure atelier and the Madison Avenue boutique in which it is all housed.

    "I feel a tremendous amount of pressure, probably of my own making," Ford says. "I'm sure there'll be some people wanting to know why there are no sexy hip-huggers."

    The two-story boutique, designed like a townhouse, is decorated to resemble Ford's own home in London, with beaver-pelt rugs and ebony woodwork. It will be staffed by the usual sales representatives, as well as maids and butlers who will fetch drinks, lunch or whatever else a client in the midst of a private appointment might need.

    The idea is to create "a residential environment that reflects the lifestyle of the clients," Ford says, a description that should give an indication of the sort of disposable income required to indulge in his latest vision. Ready-to-wear suits begin at about $3,200 and made-to-measure ones at $5,000. The least expensive item of clothing in the boutique is a pair of socks -- hand-woven -- for $75.

    The suits, made by Italy's Ermenegildo Zegna in a licensing agreement, are distinguished by their restrained -- even conservative -- cut and attention to detail: hand-knotted lapel buttons, tiny buttons that secure the trouser cuffs so that they can be folded down and any dust whisked away by a valet, and BlackBerry pockets constructed so that a man does not have to sacrifice the line of his jacket in the name of technology.

    Ford has stocked his display cases with $3,900 silk dressing gowns that are updates of 18th- and 19th-century prints. There are sapphire and diamond cuff links, handmade shoes and riding boots.

    This is not fashion -- at least not in the way Ford's former Gucci customers are accustomed to it. The changes from one season to the next will be subtle, perhaps barely discernible. "A lot of the clothes will be seasonless," he says. "The shoulder shapes should last three years."

    Ford believes there is an unfilled niche between the ultra-traditional bespoke suits from Savile Row and fashion suits from Italy. (Brooks Brothers has a similar theory. The company hired designer Thom Browne to create what it calls a "couture" collection of traditionally crafted suits with fashion panache. Prices begin at $4,000.) Ford's suits aren't stuffy or flashy. The most noticeable element is not the design but the fit, which is dazzling.

    In this new incarnation, Ford has shrugged off much of what distinguished him as a savvy fashion marketer. He is eschewing fashion shows, which he elevated to high drama at Gucci. The man who once talked about how the lifestyle of Rita Wilson, wife of Tom Hanks, influenced his thinking as a designer, now avoids celebrity references. He is his own muse.

    His glossy Hollywood image has been revised. He was not wearing his uniform of a black suit and crisp, open-collared white shirt unbuttoned to the nether regions. While giving a tour of his boutique before it opens to the public on Thursday, he was dressed in one of his own charcoal-gray two-button suits with single vent and matching vest. The trousers were lean and the shoulders sharp. He wasn't wearing a tie and his gray shirt was unbuttoned -- but only barely.

    "For me, fashion is more traditional. Maybe it has to do with my age," says Ford, 45. "Or the time. It feels very current for me."

    These are clothes for CEOs, law partners and trust-fund boys with a conservative streak.

    "As long as I can wear it, everyone can wear it," de Sole says. "I think Washington will be a very strong market."

    Ford believes his customer could just as easily be 20 years old as 80. But truth be told, when he was in his 20s, he would not have seen the beauty in a $3,000 suit like this.

    "I think I could have appreciated the gloss of it," Ford says. "I probably would have noticed that it was better than what I had seen before, but I couldn't tell you why."

    Ford is betting that a lot of men in their 20s and up also will be able to see beyond the sheen.
     


  3. Kuro

    Kuro Senior member

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    This thread has now entered stage III, in which those who have not weighed in previously complain about the conversation before proceeding to extend said conversation.

    Is stage IV when the non sequiturs begin?[​IMG]
     


  4. dopey

    dopey Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    This thread has now entered stage III, in which those who have not weighed in previously complain about the conversation before proceeding to extend said conversation.

    Had I not weighed in previously, I would point out that the TF look seems to be pretty similar to Dege's house style, though you might have to ask Dege to do a slightly wider lapel than usual and they cut the shoulder, at least for me, a bit tighter. But I fail to see why it would be a big deal for them to reproduce the TF look in a suit (other than the fabric choice, as iammatt mentions). Probably the same for Kilgour.

    I would also mention that with the $ strengthening a bit, $5,000 is not at all out of reach for a SR suit.
     


  5. voxsartoria

    voxsartoria Goon member

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    Had I not weighed in previously, I would point out that the TF look seems to be pretty similar to Dege's house style, though you might have to ask Dege to do a slightly wider lapel than usual and they cut the shoulder, at least for me, a bit tighter. But I fail to see why it would be a big deal for them to reproduce the TF look in a suit (other than the fabric choice, as iammatt mentions). Probably the same for Kilgour.

    While the military-ish SR tailors do a roped shoulder, I don't see how one would get them to do it as a spalla insellata. It would look the same to most eyes, I guess, but the sleevehead would presumably wouldn't be as full as in the Zegna-made jackets.

    I would also mention that with the $ strengthening a bit, $5,000 is not at all out of reach for a SR suit.

    Yes, the fall of pound is very exciting. I am starting to like this era of financial ruin.

    - B
     


  6. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    While the military-ish SR tailors do a roped shoulder, I don't see how one would get them to do it as a spalla insellata. It would look the same to most eyes, I guess, but the sleevehead would presumably wouldn't be as full as in the Zegna-made jackets.



    Yes, the fall of pound is very exciting. I am starting to like this era of financial ruin.

    - B

    That isn't really that dramatic a shoulder. This is: [​IMG]
     


  7. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

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    ^^^ Great tie, though.
     


  8. DocHolliday

    DocHolliday Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Had I not weighed in previously, I would point out that the TF look seems to be pretty similar to Dege's house style, though you might have to ask Dege to do a slightly wider lapel than usual and they cut the shoulder, at least for me, a bit tighter. But I fail to see why it would be a big deal for them to reproduce the TF look in a suit (other than the fabric choice, as iammatt mentions). Probably the same for Kilgour.

    I would also mention that with the $ strengthening a bit, $5,000 is not at all out of reach for a SR suit.


    I think the question is whether the purchaser wants Tom Ford or something in Tom Ford-esque style. Perhaps there are a few who find Ford the perfect articulation of their hitherto unknown preferences, but I would think that most people who want Tom Ford really want Tom Ford. In that case, I maintain, they should buy Tom Ford.

    I have not seen that much Dege, but I have not associated it with the caricature Ford offers. His strikes me as a special brand of excess.
     


  9. SoCal2NYC

    SoCal2NYC Fashion Hayzus

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    I think the question is whether the purchaser wants Tom Ford or something in Tom Ford-esque style. Perhaps there are a few who find Ford the perfect articulation of their hitherto unknown preferences, but I would think that most people who want Tom Ford really want Tom Ford. In that case, I maintain, they should buy Tom Ford.


    THIS IS NOT STYLEFORUM APPROVED THINKING!!
     


  10. edmorel

    edmorel Quality Seller!! Dubiously Honored

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    While the military-ish SR tailors do a roped shoulder, I don't see how one would get them to do it as a spalla insellata.

    - B


    I had some spalla insellata and a tortelli di patata for dinner last night. Washed it all down with some ribolla gialla.


    That isn't really that dramatic a shoulder. This is:


    I guess the suit wasn't loud enough, he needed to do the watch cuff thing also.
     


  11. Fuuma

    Fuuma Franchouillard Modasse

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    I guess the suit wasn't loud enough, he needed to do the watch cuff thing also.

    He's a style icon, style not fashion and your look will be timeless!!!
     


  12. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

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    Re, the whole watch over shirt cuff thing, it's pretty silly in the first place, but it becomes meta-silly when you "formalize" it by putting watchband straps on your shirt cuff.
     


  13. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    I had some spalla insellata and a tortelli di patata for dinner last night. Washed it all down with some ribolla gialla.




    I guess the suit wasn't loud enough, he needed to do the watch cuff thing also.

    The funny thing is that as bad as it looks in that picture, it looks even worse when viewed normally: [​IMG]
     


  14. dopey

    dopey Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    While the military-ish SR tailors do a roped shoulder, I don't see how one would get them to do it as a spalla insellata. It would look the same to most eyes, I guess, but the sleevehead would presumably wouldn't be as full as in the Zegna-made jackets.



    Yes, the fall of pound is very exciting. I am starting to like this era of financial ruin.

    - B


    I have a Dege suitcoat with me in the office today. The sleevehead is as full as it needs to be. The harder part would really be getting the concave, pagoda-looking line.

    I don't really know what the official Tom Ford look is, and I am happy to have the people who want it leave the bespoke tailors alone. But based on the Tom Ford pictures that have been posted and technical issues aside, I can't see much difference between a TF suit and what is produced by some of the military influenced SR tailors.
     


  15. DocHolliday

    DocHolliday Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I don't really know what the official Tom Ford look is, and I am happy to have the people who want it leave the bespoke tailors alone. But based on the Tom Ford pictures that have been posted and technical issues aside, I can't see much difference between a TF suit and what is produced by some of the military influenced SR tailors.

    I have to admit, I just looked at some QoS pics and the tailoring wasn't as dramatic as I recalled. But there's at least one suit with crazy pagoda shoulders -- it made an impression because it just seemed ridiculous.
     


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