1. And... we're back. You'll notice that all of your images are back as well, as are our beloved emoticons, including the infamous :foo: We have also worked with our server folks and developers to fix the issues that were slowing down the site.

    There is still work to be done - the images in existing sigs are not yet linked, for example, and we are working on a way to get the images to load faster - which will improve the performance of the site, especially on the pages with a ton of images, and we will continue to work diligently on that and keep you updated.

    Cheers,

    Fok on behalf of the entire Styleforum team
    Dismiss Notice

Any One for a Scotch?

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by French Cuff Consignment, Dec 14, 2006.

  1. aravenel

    aravenel Senior member

    Messages:
    5,624
    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    

    Laphroig is an Islay. Most Islays have their barley dried over burning peat, absorbing that "peat reek" and smoke flavor.

    Many Scotches outside of Islay display peat and smoke notes to a degree, but the Islays are the standard-bearers for peat and smoke.

    Personally, I love them, especially during the winter.
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2013
  2. poena

    poena Senior member

    Messages:
    507
    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2008
    Location:
    DC
    

    Well I have Lagavulin 16 at home and Bunnahaibhain 12 at home also and enjoy both. The Laphroig just had a slightly different flavor. Hard to pinpoint.

    I'm still new to drinking scotch so pardon my questions!
     
  3. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    8,238
    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2008
    Location:
    The Highlands of Central Oregon
    


    Making beer and making malt whisky share a common beginning--malted barley. To make Scotch barley must be "malted"--this entails moistening the barley so that it begins to sprout. There is an enzymatic process that is initiated by the sprouting that converts the starch in the barley to maltose. The sprouting process must be stopped before it goes too far, however and this means roasting and drying the malted barley over the malting floor and/or in peat fired kilns. That's a simplified version and the details maybe slightly different depending on the distillery and the fashions of the day.

    Most of the distilleries in the islands dry their barley over peat fires. Some in the Highlands still do this, also and most in the Speyside and the Lowlands dry their barley over coke. (anthracite coal)

    Every place, every island, has a little different vegetation. But while the peat in Scotland is mainly spagnum moss, there's woody materials such as heather in some locales, not so much in others. So the peat in these places differs and the flavours the smoke from the peat imparts is different...unique, actually. But peat is the traditional fuel and the standard by which all single malt Scotch is measured simply because Scotch is commonly regarded as having a smokey character...even if it doesn't have any.

    Island malts can have as much as fifteen times the amount of peat reek (as expressed in parts per million of phenols) as Speyside or Lowland malts. Island malts also have the salt spray which permeates the peat and perhaps a bit of kelp worked in there as well. So you may get iodine and other medicinal flavours.

    Ardbeg and Laphroig, in that order, are generally regarded the most heavily peated malts.

    No pardon necessary...

    --
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2013
  4. NewYorkIslander

    NewYorkIslander Senior member

    Messages:
    9,911
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2008
    Location:
    Breuckelen, NY 11209
    

    That fascinates me, the process, I mean. How someone thought of doing this is incredible and here I sit, hundreds of years later, on my couch enjoying a Scotch that some guy thought might workout by cooking and cooling some grain...and how tasty it is!

    I tried a JURA this weekend, wasn't nuts about it, had a sort of aftertaste, much like Czech Plum Brandy (Slivovitz). Anyone else try the Jura?
     
  5. BrianVarick

    BrianVarick Senior member

    Messages:
    1,759
    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2007
    Location:
    Cincinnati, OH
    I just bought some Chivas 12yr for $30, what should I have bought in that price range?
     
  6. Gibonius

    Gibonius Senior member

    Messages:
    11,116
    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2009
    Location:
    Suburban Sprawl Sector 3, Maryland
    

    They're using the locally available materials, makes sense if you think about it. What's really interesting is how the application of local materials and local climates creates such different spirits across the world. Many of the early distillers in Kentucky were Scottish and brought whisk(e)y traditions with them, but Kentucky doesn't have peat and is a lot warmer. End result is a very different product from similar initial traditions.
     
    1 person likes this.
  7. Gibonius

    Gibonius Senior member

    Messages:
    11,116
    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2009
    Location:
    Suburban Sprawl Sector 3, Maryland
    

    There was a brief discussion about that around post 1655 in this thread. It's a tough region for scotch, not great value to be had there. You can find some decent drams at $40, and lots of good options at $50.

    Honestly if you're going for the ~$30 ballpark, I'd explore bourbons before scotch. The $30 bourbons are going to be much better than the equivalent priced scotch, unless you just don't like bourbon. Might be heresy for this thread though...:embar:
     
  8. Fred G. Unn

    Fred G. Unn Senior member

    Messages:
    2,749
    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2011
    
    +1. Buffalo Trace is usually sub-$30 and is really nice! Lots of good $30-35 bourbons. Once you hit $40 you can get Highland Park, some of Compass Box's stuff, Johnny Black obviously, etc. At $50 you have plenty of options, including the Ardbeg 10 I'm drinking now. :)
     
  9. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    8,238
    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2008
    Location:
    The Highlands of Central Oregon
    

    Here's a couple of links where you can buy some pretty good single malt Scotch whisky at or around $30.00...for 375ml bottles (half bottle). It will at least get you started.

    http://www.wallywine.com/p-35509-macallan-12yr-single-malt-scotch-whisky-375ml-half-bottle.aspx

    http://www.winefetch.com/websearch_results.html?varietal=Single+Malt+Scotch&size_map=375&r=all

    PS...on edit...there are a number of places like this on the net just search for "375ml single malt scotch"

    --
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2013
  10. BrianVarick

    BrianVarick Senior member

    Messages:
    1,759
    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2007
    Location:
    Cincinnati, OH
    I appreciate the advice! I think I am going to stick with bourbon until I want to start spending $40 or $50 on scotch. I would like to start drinking single malts but I don't have much room in my budget for that:) What's a good starter Islay in the $40 range?
     
  11. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    8,238
    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2008
    Location:
    The Highlands of Central Oregon
    

    None of any note, as far as I'm concerned.

    But if you're a bourbon drinker the better part of wisdom is probably to leave the Islays alone until you've experienced the Speysides and all the rest and are comfortable with them. Islay malts are generally speaking the most idiosyncratic and distinctive of the Scottish malts. Not for everyone and certainly not...usually...for the beginner.
     
  12. MrGimpy

    MrGimpy Senior member

    Messages:
    1,384
    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2008
    Location:
    Toronto, Canada
    



    I'm not in the U.S. so not sure what it sells for there, but Bruichladdich's the Laddie 10 is a nice inexpensive Islay. It's not as peaty as a Lagavulin or Ardbeg, though not much is.

    Don't let the funky packaging put you off--it's a proper single malt.
     
  13. BrianVarick

    BrianVarick Senior member

    Messages:
    1,759
    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2007
    Location:
    Cincinnati, OH
    ^That sounds like something I am looking for. It's available for $46 near me. I am just curious to try a peaty scotch since I have heard so much about them, but I don't want it to blow me away like I am sure Lagavulin would.
     
  14. NewYorkIslander

    NewYorkIslander Senior member

    Messages:
    9,911
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2008
    Location:
    Breuckelen, NY 11209
    

    While I agree with this in principal, I started with Port Charlotte at a party, just made me appreciate the sweetness, if you will, of the others (as I'd always pretty much liked bourbon). After trying out a bunch, I now can go back and appreciate the distinct quality and tastes of the Islays. Hope that makes sense.

    FTR, I think the first bottle i bought for myself was a Bruchladdich 12 and it was just north of 40. As is the Jura 10.

    I was out at a work function the other night and my wife and I both ordered a Laphroaig 10...everyone at the bar was like, "What's burning?" LOL. We turned and laughed with each other and told them it was our drinks!:slayer:
     
  15. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

    Messages:
    50,208
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2006
    Location:
    In My Douchemobile
  16. Gibonius

    Gibonius Senior member

    Messages:
    11,116
    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2009
    Location:
    Suburban Sprawl Sector 3, Maryland
    World Whisky of the Year, huh?

    Does it live up to the hype?
     
  17. poena

    poena Senior member

    Messages:
    507
    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2008
    Location:
    DC
    

    Jura 10 is right around $40 but I it is not one that I like. I tried a Jura before that I enjoyed and I'm guessing it was one of the older ones.
     
  18. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

    Messages:
    50,208
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2006
    Location:
    In My Douchemobile
    

    I think it is pretty damn good. It was a gift from a friend of mine. He was at a store that had 10 in stock and he bought all of them. Was cool of him to spare one for me!
     
  19. Thomas

    Thomas Senior member

    Messages:
    29,119
    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2006
    Location:
    Texas

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by