1. In 2018. by way of thanks for being a part of this community, we'll be choosing 16 active members of our community at random to receive a special gift and a gift certificate for one of our affiliate vendors, to represent each of our 16 years.

    Fok and the Styleforum Team

    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice

STYLE. COMMUNITY. GREAT CLOTHING.

Bored of counting likes on social networks? At Styleforum, you’ll find rousing discussions that go beyond strings of emojis.

Click Here to join Styleforum's thousands of style enthusiasts today!

Any One for a Scotch?

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by French Cuff Consignment, Dec 14, 2006.

  1. sinnedk

    sinnedk Stylish Dinosaur

    Messages:
    12,803
    Likes Received:
    2,691
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2010
    Location:
    San Francisco
    Bulleit is my go to as well especially the rye But I want to try something different
     


  2. Gibonius

    Gibonius Stylish Dinosaur

    Messages:
    12,347
    Likes Received:
    5,487
    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2009
    Location:
    Suburban Sprawl Sector 3, Maryland
    Bulleit is solid, the rye especially. It was my go-to for quite awhile, before I switched to Rittenhouse at some point.
     


  3. jcman311

    jcman311 Distinguished Member

    Messages:
    2,743
    Likes Received:
    1,330
    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2015
    Location:
    Big Whisky
    I really dont mix liquor, but I’ve had some pretty good 1792 and Russells Reserve bourbon. The Russells Reserve was quite smooth so Im sure it would mix well.
     


  4. Man with Apple

    Man with Apple Senior Member

    Messages:
    708
    Likes Received:
    396
    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2010
    On a separate note, I am a big fan of Islay Scotch Whisky. Peat is often a love/hate relationship, and I love it. My regulars are Lagavulin 16, Ardbeg 10, and Ardbeg Uigeadall. Wife got me this bottle of Laphroig Cairdeas for Christmas and it is fantastic. Definitely recommend.

    IMG_0084.jpg
     


  5. crdb

    crdb Distinguished Member

    Messages:
    1,307
    Likes Received:
    528
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2014
    How about using one of multiple small independent distilleries that have popped up recently? I found 15 within 30 seconds of googling. I don't remember any names as there's a bar nearby that specialises in them and I get something new every time. There's probably one in your city, go there, sample, and then buy what you like.

    I personally quite like Mastersons, Whistle Pig and the other Canadian 100% ryes repackaged in the US and sold as US spirits. Might be a hair above your budget though.
     


  6. sinnedk

    sinnedk Stylish Dinosaur

    Messages:
    12,803
    Likes Received:
    2,691
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2010
    Location:
    San Francisco
    I have whistle pig at home but I wouldn’t mix a approx $100 rye into a Manhattan, seems like a waste imo.

    I was specifically looking for a good one to mix for a Manhattan.
     


  7. crdb

    crdb Distinguished Member

    Messages:
    1,307
    Likes Received:
    528
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2014
    Masterson's is $55 here: http://starwine.com/sku36825.html (from a quick Google) and AFAIK is identical to Whistle Pig.

    I do think better ingredients make for better cocktails though. You can have two philosophies of the cocktail, either the Prohibition era cutting of crap spirits with mixers to make them palatable, or an attempt at culinary creation that transcends the original, for example by adding fresh ingredients or creating a well-balanced composition. To me the Manhattan belongs to the second category, especially with a better vermouth than Martini Rosso which is too sweet and has little in the way of olfactory interest. I used to make mine with Dubonnet, not sure if that counts, and tasted a few interesting Italian and Australian ones.
     


  8. sinnedk

    sinnedk Stylish Dinosaur

    Messages:
    12,803
    Likes Received:
    2,691
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2010
    Location:
    San Francisco
    @crdb im with more of a middle ground thought. I belive cocktails should use decent liquor but def not things that are 50+ as the taste of the liquor is too masked by the additional ingredients. That being said I will definitely try that Mastersons on the rocks or neat. I like bourbon on the rocks normally and whiskey/scotch neat.

    I have a whistle pig in my cabinet that’s still unopened so maybe I’ll go out and get top shelf vermouth to see what I can come up with.
     


  9. sinnedk

    sinnedk Stylish Dinosaur

    Messages:
    12,803
    Likes Received:
    2,691
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2010
    Location:
    San Francisco
    lets move the topic to Islay. Ive been mostly into a Lagavulin 16 for my smoky scotches. I've tried several others the most notable being Lapharoig 10, px cask and another few which i don't recall. What are some of your favorite smokey scotches?
     


  10. crdb

    crdb Distinguished Member

    Messages:
    1,307
    Likes Received:
    528
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2014
    Try the Longrow CV, it might not have been destroyed yet.
     


  11. crdb

    crdb Distinguished Member

    Messages:
    1,307
    Likes Received:
    528
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2014
    Believe it or not one of my (later, final) tests for a bartender involve having them make a Sazerac out of Sazerac 18. Back when I used to do this, the bottle was impossible to find and I only ever scored one bottle in the 5 years I tried (it was worth it, but I prefer the cask strength rye whatever it is called). This is because a great bartender (I find the term "mixologist" incredibly pretentious, and relatively meaningless) will know just what proportions to use to enhance what is already a superlative product. I've only been satisfied twice, once at the Widder Bar in Zurich and once at Milk & Honey in London (long enough ago that I wouldn't attempt the experiment today).

    There is a parallel in cooking. Michel Roux Jr. at the Gavroche in London and I am sure many other chefs all the way back to Escoffier or Careme call for using premier cru and other great wines in your cooking particularly if the wine will later be served with the food it was cooked in. The wine is not added for a "winey flavour" but to impart complexity and new dimensions to the dish. Of course, this implies the person cooking knows what they are doing.

    I've personally tried cooking with a variety of alcoholic beverages and found this to be generally true. Whisky is the worst offender as the cheap blends you find in supermarkets have a harshness and lack of flavour that ruins the food.

    I liked the comic series "Oishinbo", particularly the volumes on sake and rice. It is amazing how hard it can be to get something so deceptively simple right. The greatest bars don't serve 15-ingredient concoctions, they will serve you a sazerac or old fashioned with such perfect balance that you will remember it for a long time. I even remember a daiquiri I drank out of obligation four years ago since I got it for free with my amex...
     


  12. sinnedk

    sinnedk Stylish Dinosaur

    Messages:
    12,803
    Likes Received:
    2,691
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2010
    Location:
    San Francisco
    Ok those are fair points @crdb, I am sure using the top shelf stuff would lead to amazing drinks, I guess I use more of med shelf for mix drinks. And yea whiskey is the worst offender for taste, really easy to tell a bad one.
     


  13. crdb

    crdb Distinguished Member

    Messages:
    1,307
    Likes Received:
    528
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2014
    Just opened a Lagavulin 16. What the hell happened to this dram... the salted caramel of days old is gone, what is left is the same harsh Diageo base international whisky as a hundred other labels.
     


Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by