Any One for a Scotch?

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by French Cuff Consignment, Dec 14, 2006.

  1. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    Is it really that it's never been done before? Or that no one in the Industry has access to this kind of equipment? If a bona fide expert says that some kinds of plant material produce phenols and some kinds don't, do we really need to second guess?

    I can't help being uncertain as to where the facts lie in this. The WhiskyScience blog seems to my inexperienced (and ignorant) eye to be offering up pretty "scientific" data. Perhaps based on GC/MS spectrometer results? If such results indicate that phenols themselves produce medicinal flavours, does speculation...even common sense speculation...trump?

    I suspect it is a mistake to dismiss those findings out of hand.
     


  2. katabatic

    katabatic Senior member

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    Laphroaig 10 was the first Scotch whisky I ever drank, and I loved it. It was, literally, a random selection, back in my final year of college. The liquor store had six scotches and didn't know anything about them, so I picked that one at random. Loved it straight off, although my wife is a bigger fan of the peat than I am. These days Bunnahabhain and Bruichladdich trade places as my favorite Islay malts.

    I got hooked on the single-cask, independently bottled editions a while back. This was last night's tasting (not pictured, a Caol Ila 12):


    [​IMG]
     


  3. denning

    denning Senior member

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    Just grabbed a bottle of Dunkeld Atholl Brose from Gordon MacPhail. Have not tasted it yet, but it was on sale and intrigued me enough that I thought it would be worth a try. Anyone ever had Atholl Brose before and care to comment on what I can expect?
     


  4. aravenel

    aravenel Senior member

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    For anyone in New York, Chambers St Wine is doing a tasting of Arran and Kilchoman tonight from 6 - 8.
     


  5. Gibonius

    Gibonius Senior member

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    I'm sure plenty of distillers routinely perform those types of experiments. Problem is telling who exactly is a bona fide expert, and who is a self-trained hack. I'd (probably) trust someone who worked for a big distiller, but someone who runs a blog? Hard to say without looking at their credentials. Lots of pseudo-scientific stuff in fields like this.

    I don't know enough about flavor/scent chemistry to have anything useful to say there. It's a pretty complex topic.

    I just pulled up a couple papers on it. I'll read 'em tomorrow and see if anything interesting comes up. Doubt they'll get as specific as medicinal flavor vs other notes though.
     


  6. Longmorn

    Longmorn Senior member

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    Never heard of it before, but a google search reveals it's a whisky liqueur rather than a single malt. G & M describes it as "A luxurious golden blend of single malt whisky, honey and carefully-selected herbs, Dunkeld Atholl Brose is a unique product steeped in Scottish history."
     


  7. Gibonius

    Gibonius Senior member

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    I am pleasantly surprised! Found a paper in the Journal of The Institute of Brewing, title was "Origins of Flavor in Whiskies and a Revised Flavor Wheel," and it had a nicely comprehensive listing of the chemical roots of various flavors and even mouthfeel components. Very nice.

    They say that "medicinal" notes come from cresols, while "peaty" comes from phenols. I'm not entirely sure why the cresols would taste like iodine, perhaps they trigger the same flavor receptors as iodine itself. The paper doesn't mention them being iodized compounds, although that's also possible I guess.

    The "flavor" components are mostly aldehydes and esters. They break it all down pretty in depth.

    The specific flavor compound of each whisky depends on the mash bill, how it's fermented (which sugars end up in the final product), and what's in the smoke and how hot it gets. All the reactions are detailed.


    Also, ~15% of the UK population has a genetic mutation which renders them much less sensitive to phenols, which radically changes how they perceive the whisky. Interesting stuff.


    Could send it to anybody that's interested. Pretty heavy stuff though.
     


  8. NewYorkIslander

    NewYorkIslander Affiliate Vendor

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    Tonight is Caol Ila 10 and then Bruchladdich Rocks
     


  9. mktitsworth

    mktitsworth Senior member

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    I could use a break from root partitions and quantum field theory. PM in bound.
     


  10. NewYorkIslander

    NewYorkIslander Affiliate Vendor

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    Best Glenfarclas? How would you compare to Balvenie generally?
     


  11. gnatty8

    gnatty8 Senior member

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    This can be a very open-ended question. Best to specify a price range.
     


  12. Longmorn

    Longmorn Senior member

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    Glenfarclas is much more heavily sherried than Blavenie. All the expressions that I've tried have a treacly note. Think Christmas pudding - spices, dried fruit, toffee, etc. At the most extreme it can be cloyingly sweet IMO. If you haven't had it before, I'd try a couple of expressions in a bar before buying a bottle.
     


  13. gopherblue

    gopherblue Senior member

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    I remember when I could've bought the 1989 Latour and 1989 Haut Brion for $99. I bought one bottle each of '89 Mouton Rothschild and '89 Margaux instead. Had I not been a complete moron (and poor post-college person), I would've bought 6 btls of all four.
     


  14. gopherblue

    gopherblue Senior member

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    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2013


  15. Longmorn

    Longmorn Senior member

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    Nice!
     


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