• We would like to welcome American Trench as an official Affiliate Vendor. American Trench is a Philadelphia based outerwear, apparel, and accessories brand, making all of its products in the United States at (mostly) family owned factories. . Please visit the American Trench thread and welcome them to the forum.

  • STYLE. COMMUNITY. GREAT CLOTHING.

    Bored of counting likes on social networks? At Styleforum, you’ll find rousing discussions that go beyond strings of emojis.

    Click Here to join Styleforum's thousands of style enthusiasts today!

Antonio Meccariello Shoes

BColl_Has_Too_Many_Shoes

Distinguished Member
Joined
Nov 14, 2017
Messages
4,854
Reaction score
24,825
I was recently having a conversation about high end watches, and the undisclosed fees (as it relates to service charges) one incurs. It isn't something that is often talked about by retailers or watch owners. Sadly, it is an unavoidable charge.

Somewhat related, hand-welted shoes are the epitome of shoe craftsmanship. Its virtues are applauded and advertised by craftsman, shoe experts, enthusiasts, informed shoe owners, and your curious shoe reader. Many, if not all, use the shoe's construction as part of an argument to quantify value (something quite difficult to describe or nail down).

One aspect of this holy construction method that isn't spoken about is the added cost of handsewn soles. That characteristic of them being handsewn is important to the shoe's overall aura of it being the gold standard of craftsmanship.

Is it truly necessary? No. It's the finishing touch in further bragging about your shoes. Should you look for it? Depends. As the watch servicing fee, recrafting will (at some point) need to occur. It is inevitable and unavoidable. As the watch servicing fee, it isn't often spoken about.

AMs are a great value (no doubt), but are they still a great value when you have to send the shoes back to Italy while incurring both shipping costs and service costs?
For example, your soles are handsewn and your shoes HW. You pay $1000 for 'em. When the time comes you'd need to fork over another (estimated) $300 dollars. Nearly the price or more of many GYW shoes out in the market.

I can't decide for anyone whether you'd require handsewn soles, but what I can do is implore you to consider the additional costs involved when you need to search for either a Cobbler who can handsew soles or the added costs of sending them back to the original maker.

A machine sewn sole is just as good and it is much easier to find a local guy who can take care of that for you when the time comes.
Just a thought.
 
Last edited:

deez shoes

Distinguished Member
Joined
Jun 1, 2016
Messages
1,136
Reaction score
6,663
I was recently having a conversation about high end watches, and the undisclosed fees (as it relates to service charges) one incurs. It isn't something that is often talked about by retailers or watch owners. Sadly, it is an unavoidable charge.

Somewhat related, hand-welted shoes are the epitome of shoe craftsmanship. Its virtues are applauded and advertised by craftsman, shoe experts, enthusiasts, informed shoe owners, and your average shoe reader. Many, if not all, use the shoe's construction as part of an argument to quantify value (something quite difficult to describe or nail down).

One aspect of this holy construction method that isn't spoken about is handsewn soles. That characteristic is critical to the shoe's overall selling point of it being the gold standard of craftsmanship.

Is it necessary? No. It's the finishing touch in further bragging about your shoes. Should you look for it? Depends. As the watch servicing fee, recrafting will (at some point) need to occur. It is inevitable and unavoidable. As the watch servicing fee, it isn't spoken about.

AMs are a great value (no doubt), but are they still a great value when you have to send the shoes back to Italy while incurring both shipping costs and service costs?
For example, your soles are handsewn and your shoes HW. You pay $1000 for 'em. When the time comes you'd need to fork over another (estimated) $300 dollars. Nearly the price or more of many GYW shoes out in the market.

I can't decide for anyone whether you'd require handsewn soles, but what I can do is implore you to consider the additional costs involved when you need to search for either a Cobbler who can handsew soles or the added costs of sending them back to the original maker.

A machine sewn sole is just as good and it is much easier to find a local guy who can take care of that for you when the time comes.
Just a thought.
By the time you need a resole, the price for the same pair has probably increased by the cost of a resole or more haha.
 

BColl_Has_Too_Many_Shoes

Distinguished Member
Joined
Nov 14, 2017
Messages
4,854
Reaction score
24,825
This is very true, those purchases are definitely not "one and done".

Then there's the argument of having too many shoes - one would never get to the point of needing resoling services on any given pair... ?
That's definitely true. More shoes means less of a likelihood for a resole. Although, we can also say a recraft may be ~$300 while brand new shoes are ~$???.
 

jischwar

Distinguished Member
Joined
Mar 12, 2012
Messages
5,621
Reaction score
14,205
I was recently having a conversation about high end watches, and the undisclosed fees (as it relates to service charges) one incurs. It isn't something that is often talked about by retailers or watch owners. Sadly, it is an unavoidable charge.

Somewhat related, hand-welted shoes are the epitome of shoe craftsmanship. Its virtues are applauded and advertised by craftsman, shoe experts, enthusiasts, informed shoe owners, and your curious shoe reader. Many, if not all, use the shoe's construction as part of an argument to quantify value (something quite difficult to describe or nail down).

One aspect of this holy construction method that isn't spoken about is the added cost of handsewn soles. That characteristic of them being handsewn is important to the shoe's overall aura of it being the gold standard of craftsmanship.

Is it truly necessary? No. It's the finishing touch in further bragging about your shoes. Should you look for it? Depends. As the watch servicing fee, recrafting will (at some point) need to occur. It is inevitable and unavoidable. As the watch servicing fee, it isn't often spoken about.

AMs are a great value (no doubt), but are they still a great value when you have to send the shoes back to Italy while incurring both shipping costs and service costs?
For example, your soles are handsewn and your shoes HW. You pay $1000 for 'em. When the time comes you'd need to fork over another (estimated) $300 dollars. Nearly the price or more of many GYW shoes out in the market.

I can't decide for anyone whether you'd require handsewn soles, but what I can do is implore you to consider the additional costs involved when you need to search for either a Cobbler who can handsew soles or the added costs of sending them back to the original maker.

A machine sewn sole is just as good and it is much easier to find a local guy who can take care of that for you when the time comes.
Just a thought.
Just to add some numbers here for perspective since last spring/summer, I had two shoes sent back for refurbishment.

Saint Crispins (handwelted, not sure about sole attachment) - € 295 for a new half sole and heels

Crockett and Jones (GYW) - £125 for a full resole and relasted to a half size smaller
 

Jmr928

Distinguished Member
Joined
Aug 30, 2019
Messages
2,542
Reaction score
22,187
I was recently having a conversation about high end watches, and the undisclosed fees (as it relates to service charges) one incurs. It isn't something that is often talked about by retailers or watch owners. Sadly, it is an unavoidable charge.

Somewhat related, hand-welted shoes are the epitome of shoe craftsmanship. Its virtues are applauded and advertised by craftsman, shoe experts, enthusiasts, informed shoe owners, and your curious shoe reader. Many, if not all, use the shoe's construction as part of an argument to quantify value (something quite difficult to describe or nail down).

One aspect of this holy construction method that isn't spoken about is the added cost of handsewn soles. That characteristic of them being handsewn is important to the shoe's overall aura of it being the gold standard of craftsmanship.

Is it truly necessary? No. It's the finishing touch in further bragging about your shoes. Should you look for it? Depends. As the watch servicing fee, recrafting will (at some point) need to occur. It is inevitable and unavoidable. As the watch servicing fee, it isn't often spoken about.

AMs are a great value (no doubt), but are they still a great value when you have to send the shoes back to Italy while incurring both shipping costs and service costs?
For example, your soles are handsewn and your shoes HW. You pay $1000 for 'em. When the time comes you'd need to fork over another (estimated) $300 dollars. Nearly the price or more of many GYW shoes out in the market.

I can't decide for anyone whether you'd require handsewn soles, but what I can do is implore you to consider the additional costs involved when you need to search for either a Cobbler who can handsew soles or the added costs of sending them back to the original maker.

A machine sewn sole is just as good and it is much easier to find a local guy who can take care of that for you when the time comes.
Just a thought.
The debate over machine and hand sewn gets even more interesting given I’ve seen some machine stitched soles that are cleaner than hand stitched soles. Give me the well executed machine stitched soles like those from AM over a sloppy hand stitched soles elsewhere. Although if I can have my choice between those that are both executed well I’d take the hand sewn if I had the option I suppose just because.
 

shoes83

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 2, 2020
Messages
261
Reaction score
601
That's definitely true. More shoes means less of a likelihood for a resole. Although, we can also say a recraft may be ~$300 while brand new shoes are ~$???.
Of course, hence my ?

Would you send your handwelted AM back to him or work with one of the really good cobblers in NYC or the U.S.? Not sure who does handwelting, but would guess we have options here.
 

BColl_Has_Too_Many_Shoes

Distinguished Member
Joined
Nov 14, 2017
Messages
4,854
Reaction score
24,825
Just to add some numbers here for perspective since last spring/summer, I had two shoes sent back for refurbishment.

Saint Crispins (handwelted, not sure about sole attachment) - € 295 for a new half sole and heels

Crockett and Jones (GYW) - £125 for a full resole and relasted to a half size smaller
That certainly adds further context to my thought. ?
 

BColl_Has_Too_Many_Shoes

Distinguished Member
Joined
Nov 14, 2017
Messages
4,854
Reaction score
24,825
Of course, hence my ?

Would you send your handwelted AM back to him or work with one of the really good cobblers in NYC or the U.S.? Not sure who does handwelting, but would guess we have options here.
That's a great question. I hadn't considered it because it has not come up. Based on what I spent on them, I'd probably send the shoes back to Italy. If I paid half as much probably not. I think I would just have them machine sewn.
 

BColl_Has_Too_Many_Shoes

Distinguished Member
Joined
Nov 14, 2017
Messages
4,854
Reaction score
24,825
The debate over machine and hand sewn gets even more interesting given I’ve seen some machine stitched soles that are cleaner than hand stitched soles. Give me the well executed machine stitched soles like those from AM over a sloppy hand stitched soles elsewhere. Although if I can have my choice between those that are both executed well I’d take the hand sewn if I had the option I suppose just because.
I certainly have seen some clean clean work with a machine no question about it.
 

JustPullHarder

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 13, 2020
Messages
550
Reaction score
1,280
I was recently having a conversation about high end watches, and the undisclosed fees (as it relates to service charges) one incurs. It isn't something that is often talked about by retailers or watch owners. Sadly, it is an unavoidable charge.
I always thought servicing watches regularly (i.e. before they stop ticking) is a complete waste of money. The service costs are almost always flat fees and involve anything necessary to get the movement working again. It's the equivalent of a shoemaker recommending that the sole be replaced every year regardless of use or condition.
 

Featured Sponsor

What's Your Favorite Summer Shoe?

  • Loafers

  • Boat shoes

  • Espadrilles

  • Sneakers

  • Desert Boots

  • Sandals


Results are only viewable after voting.

Forum statistics

Threads
475,265
Messages
10,159,517
Members
213,575
Latest member
Visiblo
Top