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Antonio Meccariello Shoes

RishaStyle

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I often walk on slick marble floors and noticed that my AMs still result in slippage even though the soles on my heels and front shoes are definitely worn in after several wears (even used scissors to scratch them up at first). Any idea on why the shoes are still slippery? I’m wondering if it’s because the fiddleback waist is making contact with the floor?
Do they metal toe tips? If yes, that is most likely the reason for slippage.
 

shirtingfantasy

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Funny enough I have a pair with toe tips and one without hut they both slip.
Scratching with a blade won’t suffice. The best way is to wear the shoes and walk on some rough pavement. This wears off the smooth layer on the sole leather evenly and makes it less slippery.
 

shirtingfantasy

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shirtingfantasy

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If you even need to clean old wax and polish, you can use neutral cream (contains turpentine) or pure turpentine (inexpensive and effective). They are safer to both the leather and the dye.

Renomat can remove dye and leather finishing, and should be avoided.
 

unprocessed

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If you even need to clean old wax and polish, you can use neutral cream (contains turpentine) or pure turpentine (inexpensive and effective). They are safer to both the leather and the dye.

Renomat can remove dye and leather finishing, and should be avoided.
I’ve had success using Renovateur to remove old wax, just takes several applications and buffing.
 

spencert

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Ahem... would advise against using Renovateur. Not the liquid gold that it is made out to be. Has taken color off my shoes before.
 

shirtingfantasy

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Haven’t really noticed that before, although regular use it really is mostly absorbed by the leather?
Renovateur (the “contains mink oil” one) is claimed to be very gentle, but many have reported colour loss with use. It has some aqueous content that tends to interfere with some dyes. if you use a cloth to apply it you can sometimes see colour being slowly rubbed off. There are stories of Saint Crispins crust leather shoes being decolourized by this liquid gold.

Personally these mishaps have not happened to me, but I have also stopped using regular use of Renovateur on crust after the colourist at Berluti explained that it can create problems with future cleaning and colouring. They say mink oil “clog the pores” and “subsequent colour would be uneven”.

Renomat (the smelly solvent) as mentioned is very dangerous. Just stay away.
 

Zaos1

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Really, also Renovateur not good?? And i always thought my shoes are well nourished by using it prior to polish! :eh:
 

shirtingfantasy

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Really, also Renovateur not good?? And i always thought my shoes are well nourished by using it prior to polish! :eh:
I still use it for my aniline boxcalf shoes, for the record.

@dieworkwear wrote -

“For the customer, there are upsides and downsides. The upside is that crust can age beautifully, getting a sort of depth in the color not easily achievable in normal leather (see my wingtips above). The downside is the leather also requires a bit more upkeep. Shoes can easily look dull after a few wears, and you’ll want to be careful with which sorts of conditioners you use (a bit of Saphir Renovateur once wrecked my crust leather chukkas, although Saint Crispin’s was able to fix them for me). To get that beautiful luster you see in Ethan Newton’s photos, you need to shine them somewhat regularly. Again, maybe not for your average, everyday shoe customer, but possibly a good choice for the enthusiast.” - https://www.google.com.hk/amp/s/dieworkwear.com/post/163730058154/the-bridge-to-bespoke-shoes/amp
 

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