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Antiques, antiques auctions, recent purchases and discussion

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by idfnl, Jan 5, 2013.

  1. idfnl

    idfnl Senior member

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    I go to antiques auctions pretty regularly and like to collect. Thought I'd start a thread to share in the interest.

    If the thread develops legs, I'll post some others.


    I recently bought this walnut cane back chair from a Weschler's auction in DC. Its c 1920, larger than it seems in the photo

    [​IMG]




    And this walnut Milo Baughman came from Craigslist for a song at $45. This pic is borrowed, but it looks the same.

    [​IMG]
     
    1 person likes this.
  2. CodyNC

    CodyNC Well-Known Member

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    Nice finds, I really like the 2nd chair
     
  3. Medwed

    Medwed Senior member

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    [​IMG]

    Rosewood bombe chest, late 18 early 19 century. Had a lot of wood cracks and small veneer loss. Took me two weeks to restore it.
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2013
  4. idfnl

    idfnl Senior member

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    Thanks!


    Very nice. Hard to judge scale, is it typical chest or closer to an end table size? I've seen these be rather small before.
     
  5. Medwed

    Medwed Senior member

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    It is large: 45x45x22. BTW, it is a 5-drawer chest, which is not obvious from the looks of it. Most chests from that era are very large. 18/19 century furniture is generally not of diminutive proportions. Case furniture of this type was produced for well to do clients who lived in large apartments or houses with appropriately large rooms to accomodate this furniture. The only furniture that is suitable (size-wise) for modern dwellings is seating from that era.
    I have been auction hunting for years and found it extremly rewarding financially and aesthetically.
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2013
  6. idfnl

    idfnl Senior member

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    Me too. Its a treasure hunt.

    I have something similar to that, also with some damage to the marquetry but I'm a dope with repairs.

    This one is miniature, about 14" tall, c 1910, kingwood and tulipwood jewelry chest.


    [​IMG]
     
  7. troika

    troika Senior member

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    This really is beautiful. Is it comfortable to sit in?

     
  8. Medwed

    Medwed Senior member

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    That is a cute little stand. I like yellow woods , bleached mahogany, walnut, yew, but especially burl elmwood which is extremly rare. I have some 19c American peices from tiger maple that I like a lot. Tiger was usually used for one ofa kind, custom pieces and thus more rare and not as ubiquitous as Mahogany. I never go to auctions in person , I buy online or over the phone. It is a great davantage to be able to visit showrooms in person, especially more obscure ones.

    Kitchen piece.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2013
  9. idfnl

    idfnl Senior member

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    Thanks, yes and no. If you're old or tall its not since it sits low to the ground. Otherwise yes, but unfortunately its in a room that doesn't get a lot of use.
     
  10. idfnl

    idfnl Senior member

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    Is this piece English? Never saw Yew until I started trolling auctions there.


    By the way, this website is brilliant for finding local auctions:

    https://www.auctionzip.com/

    Just put in your zipcode and radius and it tells you every auction around you. You can filter by keyword too. The listings generally have photo catalogs and you can bid online for many.
     
  11. Medwed

    Medwed Senior member

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    I am not certain, but it is a good guess since this type of furniture is called "Welsh dresser". It is made of Elm. Thanks for the tip, I just never got used to Zip's interface it annoys the heck out of me.:)
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2013
  12. idfnl

    idfnl Senior member

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    Its usability sucks, but there doesn't seem to be a better alternative.

    Also, there are lots of auctions I don't care about, restaurant equipment and so forth which I wish I could filter.



    I bought this tool chest a few months ago. Its got a great patina.


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
     
  13. Medwed

    Medwed Senior member

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    It is nice. Looks like campaign chest (type of stack-able furniture from 19C). Do sections have handles on the sides? How are you planing to use it, kitchen?
     
  14. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

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    Which makers do you guys look for from the 19th century? I find most of the 19th century stuff I come across is part of that whole industrial revolution mishmash of design elements.
     
  15. Medwed

    Medwed Senior member

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    I don't quite understand what you mean by mish-mash design. Do u have an example?

    (There r periods within 19C. , which r very distinct in their design elements)
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2013
  16. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

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    I'm terribly unfamiliar with prominent 19c makers which is why I'm asking which ones you seek out. The American revival furniture period coincides with the implementation of steam powered manufacturing which allowed manufactures to create ready-made parts for the first time, combined with a taste for the past, it created a period of ubiquitous design inspired by previous styles. While there still is alot of handwork and quality to most of what I've seen, it is unremarkable compared to the 18c American and European styles that it mimics.

    However I still believe there was a handful of makers producing top quality, which seems to be the case in every era.
     
  17. idfnl

    idfnl Senior member

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    ^^ With antiques, I'm sorta mostly a 'dunno much about beer but I know what I like' kind of guy.

    But I do understand what you are alluding to. I remember a piece coming to the (British) Antiques Roadshow, it was a dinner table.

    The expert identified the table top and bottom as being from different eras.

    The top was authentic 15th c, but the bottom had details that made it look 17th c. Where it got interesting was that the bottom was in fact not 17 c, it was from the 19th c and was a 17th c reproduction.

    Where he spotted it as a reproduction was that it was intentionally made to look rough, which to an Edwardian was the idea of what a 17th c piece would look. In fact it was not the case, tables of this magnitude were perfectly executed and very polished, the cost a fortune and were only ever owned by elite.

    The table was still worth $25,000. The appraiser said it would be worth over $100,000 if it was auth 15th c.
     
  18. Medwed

    Medwed Senior member

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    I see, Goombah is talking about revival styles. I don't know much about them except that I do not like any of them. I don't think you can shop for manufacturers when it comes to antique furniture from 19C. I have not seen a single piece of furniture from 19C. that had manufacturer's label on it. That does not mean they do not exist ,but that shopping for them is pointless. It just was not done those days and if some shop did attach a label it was on paper and did not survive to our days. You might get lucky and find a makers autograph on the panel inside or underside of the drawer, but this is really rare, I mean extremely rare and the price of that piece would be 10 times what similar unsigned is selling for. Makers those days were not leaving a lot of clues to us, perhaps they lacked vanity:) I did find a few pencil marks and signs on a couple of pieces that I own but they are left overs from the manufacturing process and don't give any clues to the nationality let alone the name of the maker.
    I am with Idfnl on this , buy what you like. Educate yourself a little ,so that you don't buy a fugeze, but buy with your eyes.
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2013
  19. Medwed

    Medwed Senior member

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    [​IMG]

    Here is a tiger maple lowboy which is typical American furntiure peice. I think it is not very old , probably early 20th or later, but the workmanship is really top notch. The maker was obsessive-compulsive type ; each small drawer has 7 dove-tailed joints :) . Also I believe that tiger maple is a typical American wood (never seen anything from Europe made of it) and very rarely used as veneer (probably due to low cost of maple) thus you are getting American classic made of maple solids (which is nice).
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2013
  20. idfnl

    idfnl Senior member

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    ^^ 99% sure Tiger Maple is American. Almost a dead giveaway this is a US piece.

    Agree, that is quality. Where are you located Medwed?

    To your point, I've seen/bought some solid reproductions. Reproduction in the furniture world is not the same as fake watches, etc. Its more like a homage. And its up to a craftsman to detail it.

    I have this amazing pine dinner table that is a reproduction farm table. Its unbelievable. Probably the best score of my life considering what I paid for it. Anyway, this table was featured in a woodworking magazine with designs, an interview with the craftsman, etc. Its really a piece of art and the seller was the son of the mother that ordered it made in the 80's for a few thousand $, which is a lot during that time. You wouldn't believe what I paid. He just didn't value it.

    I got it via craigslist. Sent him an email as soon as I saw it. 5 days later, after believing he got 100 emails and took the first I got a mail. He happened to be traveling. He said I was first and if I still wanted it, then it was mine. I was there within 2 hours and bought it. I've never felt so satisfied in 15 years of antiquing.

    Another great score was actually recently and relates to this theme. Will have to take some pics. Its a Dragonfly reproduction Tiffany stained glass lamp. But its huge. Its a side table lamp that takes 3 bulbs, its more than 2 feet wide and weighs about 40 pounds. Came from hand maker in San Fran. Its superb. I cant drop $5000 on a real one, and the mass of this one makes it rare and special. So you see a reproduction can still be quality, rare, and special.

    And BTW, the word 'pine' above has a totally different meaning than the young growth shit from IKEA.
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2013

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