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Allen Edmonds Appreciation Thread - reviews, pictures, sizing, etc...

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mild Mannered, Sep 27, 2009.

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  1. Flokk

    Flokk Active Member

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    After much hemming and hawing I decided to order Park Avenues in black, Mcallisters in Walnut, and Strands in Walnut (with a 13.5, 4E foot, I know it's going to take a lot of playing around to find the right fit). With backordered Bruces for stomping around. I've been on a college budget and have relied on Clarks and other random brands before this. Thanks for the excellent discussion which helped guide my decision!
     


  2. clynch

    clynch New Member

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    I have the McAllisters in Walnut and they are my favorite shoes. Both in comfort and looks. You'll love them.
     


  3. tesuquegolfer

    tesuquegolfer Senior member

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    So I am searching the Bay last week for a deal on some AEs and I come across some Aberdeens in 10B with one low bid. I try to do some searches on the fit/size on a number 2 last and figure I'll just give them a try with a low bid. If I win I figure I can always sell them again if they don't fit. Lo and behold, I win them with a bid of $61.00 and $9.99 for shipping. The have supposedly been worn once and come without trees or a box, what a steal. I wear a 10C in the 5 last and these are a 10B. I have heard that the rough collections don't fit like other shoes on the same last due to leather thickness... Anyone want to chime in on whether they might fit? I have worn a 10B in other shoes but usually wear a 10.5. Here's a pic:

    [​IMG]
     


  4. kmdsimpson

    kmdsimpson Senior member

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    This is going to be a tough one to judge. The 2 last is particularly narrow; then you are going B width on top of that, making it super narrow. But the 5 last you started with is not wide, and you go C in that. Plus, it's the rough leather, which might be a little wider. Maybe they all cancel each other out. It'll be close, though.
     


  5. ajmanouk

    ajmanouk Senior member

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    yes!
     


  6. BootSpell

    BootSpell Senior member

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    Quote:
    That might work. But a 10D might also work. I have the Strands (#5) in 7.5D and a few pairs of Daltons (#1) in 8D. The Daltons fit perfectly but the Strands are a bit snug. A 7.5E in the Strands might have been better. If 9.5E Rapid City's aren't easily available in the sale, you could try a 10D. Good luck.
     


  7. phototristan

    phototristan Senior member

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    Last edited: Apr 15, 2013


  8. OptoDoc

    OptoDoc Senior member

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    Did someone say 'tunnel vision'?

    I can help with that [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2013


  9. Close Hoarse

    Close Hoarse Senior member

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    Thanks. AE discontinued the Players a few months back I think. You can still find some on eBay and AE's outlet stores. I like the new Spaggia in white suede too. It's a balmoral.

    CH
     


  10. wdahab

    wdahab Senior member

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    Okay, so I see this pop up from time to time, and I'm kind of curious if I'm misreading them. To me, this simply is talking about their handsewns, as it says in the article. Those handsewns are clearly marked as made in the Dominican Republic. Like, not even close to hidden, it's marked on the shoe, it's clear on the website. The article also mentions that the DR products are then shipped to Maine to be handsewn in Lewiston, which isn't clearly marked on the shoe. That's pretty awesome, if you ask me. If they wanted to be scamming us, they'd say "Handsewn in Maine, put together in the USA" but AE doesn't. They say Made in DR.

    Now, everyone seems to read this as "My McAllisters might secretly be made in the DR?" Perhaps the CEO can clarify this, or someone with actual knowledge of this (and not just second-hand knowledge). But everytime I see this pop up, it still reads to me as "no, my McAllisters are made in Wisconsin, just like the label says."
     


  11. phototristan

    phototristan Senior member

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    I don't think it's just the handsewn models, but could be wrong. From the 2nd link above:

    "the part of the Goodyear welt process that's also done in the DR is the cutting of the upper leathers, sewing of those pieces together and "hanging" of the lining"

    doesn't sound like just hand sewing to me.

    I personally don't care if they are made in Siberia. But billing themselves as

    [​IMG]


    just seems disingenuous, at best.
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2013


  12. Close Hoarse

    Close Hoarse Senior member

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    Last edited: Apr 16, 2013


  13. mexicutioner

    mexicutioner Senior member

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    mediahound: you should probably do some more research before you speculate. if you search for "dominican" on the AE website, SEVERAL models come up. what you're doing -- implying that, a random web story somehow proves that AE is secretly doing what you're saying -- is irresponsible. but if you were the kind of person who would listen to reason you probably wouldn't have posted this stuff in the first place without doing your research.
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2013


  14. phototristan

    phototristan Senior member

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    Did you even read the 2nd link? It's a post from the CEO himself. You would do well to do so. -

    http://www.styleforum.net/t/228354/...-in-the-dominican-republic/0_100#post_4903126

    "How the duplicated work on the uppers gets distributed between the two plants depends on order flows from week to week."

    Here's what he said there, in it's entirety:


    "Gentlemen -

    Thanks for your feedback. We do indeed have duplicative capabilities at the beginning of the shoemaking process in Wisconsin and, since 2006, in the Dominican Republic. Both plants are 100% owned and managed closely by us, staffed by our employees. If you watch our YouTube Plant Tour video (available on our website home page), the part of the Goodyear welt process that's also done in the DR is the cutting of the upper leathers, sewing of those pieces together and "hanging" of the lining. The resulting work-in-process looks like a flattened baseball cap with a large hole in the top and no sewn seams around the brim or the bottom of the cap.

    The lining and the unfinished upper are attached together and to the bottom of the shoe in the lasting and welting processes, which are all done in Wisconsin. The footbed (inside bottom) leather cutting and the welt taping for the sides and bottoms of the shoes are done 100% in Port Washington, as is the rest of the production process -- the shaping of the loose uppers in preparation for lasting, insertion of toeboxes and heel counters, lasting, attaching the footbed, welting, hot corking, sewing on the sole, nailing and gluing on the heel base, attaching the heel "toplift", trimming all the edges, wheeling, cutting, trimming and attaching the sock liner (when used), and all the stages of finishing. How the duplicated work on the uppers gets distributed between the two plants depends on order flows from week to week.

    The increase in demand for our shoes has led us to hire more people in both plants on all functions, which is good for both local economies. We're proud to be building economic vitality in two places that need it in the Western Hemisphere, one right here in Wisconsin and one a few hundred miles off the shore of Florida. History buffs might see this as our micro version of the Monroe Doctrine or maybe a localized DR Marshall Plan.

    This formula works for us and for our U.S. employment growth, which is where the majority of our new hires are. Keeping our prices lower than any other fully Goodyear welted shoe manufacturer is an important part of our AE value proposition. It also allows us to spread workload effectively between the two locations so that we keep our delivery times as short as possible, a couple of days in many instances. Delivery to major wholesale accounts with that kind of flexibility is a major competitive advantage versus the Asian shoe importers who send shoes by ocean vessel in containerloads. Keeping our prices under control keeps us accessible for more and more customers with family budgets.

    Thanks for the question and the interest. I hope the hundreds (and growing) of people we have in our Port Washington facitilities will continue to have your support.

    Best wishes,
    Paul"
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2013


  15. kmdsimpson

    kmdsimpson Senior member

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    Mediahound, this is not news. They freely admit to this manufacturing and have been doing it for a while. They have: - Wholly made in the DR shoes: the "ae" line - Uppers made in the DR and the rest of the shoes assembled in the US: Various shoes. They actually move production between the DR and the US depending on needs. - Wholly made in the US shoes: shell cordovan and possibly the Independence line (not sure about the latter) They divulge full information and are wholly upfront about this in all their materials. Yes, the shoes say "Made in the USA", but they are allowed to by law. Do a little searching, though, and you'll find plenty of stories and interviews where the CEO is open about this practice. You can feel free to insist on fully made in the USA, but "disingenuous" is not the right word for what they are doing. Sounds like you're new to the brand. No problem; but everyone here already knows.
     


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