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Accepting/declining a job offer

Discussion in 'Business, Careers & Education' started by GreenFrog, Jun 8, 2011.

  1. GreenFrog

    GreenFrog Senior member

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    I've been through a lot of final round interviews as of late, and I just received an internship offer. Obviously, I want a full-time position, so while this internship opportunity is great, I am positive that I will pass it on in favor of a full time position.

    That being said, I think I rocked my final round interview yesterday (*knocks on wood*), which was for a full time position, and I have high hopes that they will extend me an offer. One of the interviewers responded to my thank you email, saying that "Mr. ______ will be in touch soon."

    I'm hoping for the best, but preparing for the worst.

    So, if I do end up getting a phone call from my prospective employer with a job offer, how is one supposed to handle it in a professional manner?

    Google says I should be thankful, enthusiastic, etc, and to ask for a written confirmation of the package via email or whatnot. Then, it says you should ask for a day or two to think it over.

    After thinking it over, it says to call back and ask any questions you might have.

    Is there anything else?

    NOW,

    The dilemma is that I only have until Friday to accept/decline my internship offer. If I get an offer from the aforementioned full-time employer before then, great. I can decline the internship offer. But if I don't hear back from them before Friday, should I just go ahead and accept the internship? What if I accept the internship and I get the full-time offer next week? I guess I could renege but that's something I'd ultimately like to avoid.

    Any opinions/advice?

    I realize this is all in speculation, and please don't take this as me being arrogant and expecting a job offer. I just want to be prepared for any situation that may arise.

    Thanks!
     
  2. suited

    suited Senior member

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    The last thing you want to do is end up empty handed. I certainly wouldn't decline the internship only to find out that you didn't get the full time position. You have two options, take the internship and leave if you are offered the other job, or ask for more time to make your decision. I would probably take the internship, and then if you're offered the full time job, just be up front with them. Explain to them that you were grateful for the opportunity, but you can't turn down a full time position with a salary. People will understand that you have bills to pay, and I can't imagine any employer not understanding your situation.

    If you ask for more time you make your decision, you risk them offering the internship to someone else. So make sure you consider that.
     
  3. Dbear

    Dbear Senior member

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    Come Friday, ask for more time to think it over and wait for your full-time offer.
     
  4. Sazerac

    Sazerac Senior member

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    Accept the internship, then if the full-time job offer comes in and it's 100% locked-in, politely decline the internship explaining you received a full-time job. There is nothing dishonest about this.

    Asking for more time to make a decision will make you seem, well, indecisive.

    Remember, you're talking about corporations here. Your desire to be polite and not string them along is misplaced. They have precisely zero loyalty to you and will always -- always -- do what is in their best interest. You must act the same way.

    Companies make offers to people and then retract them all the time, leaving the candidate high and dry. There's no reason you can't accept the internship and change your mind down the road.
     
  5. JayJay

    JayJay Senior member

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    The last thing you want to do is end up empty handed. I certainly wouldn't decline the internship only to find out that you didn't get the full time position. You have two options, take the internship and leave if you are offered the other job, or ask for more time to make your decision. I would probably take the internship, and then if you're offered the full time job, just be up front with them. Explain to them that you were grateful for the opportunity, but you can't turn down a full time position with a salary. People will understand that you have bills to pay, and I can't imagine any employer not understanding your situation.

    If you ask for more time you make your decision, you risk them offering the internship to someone else. So make sure you consider that.

    I think this is good advice. I wouldn't want to be left empty-handed.
     
  6. Pennglock

    Pennglock Senior member

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    Tell the full-time contact that you have another offer that explodes Friday. This stuff happens all the time and they'll work with you.

    Accept the internship, then if the full-time job offer comes in and it's 100% locked-in, politely decline the internship explaining you received a full-time job. There is nothing dishonest about this.

    I disagree with this. Im all for putting your own interests first, but this is pretty much universally considered unethical in the recruiting world. If this kid is going through his college career department, he could get his privileges revoked.
     
  7. DaveB

    DaveB Senior member

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    Tell the full-time contact that you have another offer that explodes Friday. This stuff happens all the time and they'll work with you.



    I disagree with this. Im all for putting your own interests first, but this is pretty much universally considered unethical in the recruiting world. If this kid is going through his college career department, he could get his privileges revoked.


    I agree, at least when using college services this could be a serious issue. Last year a student at my school accepted an internship and then decided to do a different one. The boss of the internship sponsor who is an alumni of my school was none to happy, called yelled at career services, they thought they might lose the internships, subsequently career services will no longer help the student find employment if needed and the story has become a cautionary tail for other students when being told about job-offer etiquette.
     
  8. GreenFrog

    GreenFrog Senior member

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    Thanks guys. Should I tell them that I simply have "another offer" or should I be specific and say that it's an internship?

    Also, I just graduated last month so I'm an alumnus. Granted, alumni get access to our career services but the penalty of losing that privilege wouldn't be as severe as it would be for an undergrad.

    Also, does anyone have any insight on the first portion of my post -- how to handle a job offer phone call?
     
  9. austinite

    austinite Well-Known Member

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    You're a college graduate looking for full time work. To me you are getting lowballed by being offered an internship anyway, so I wouldn't feel too bad changing my mind when a full time offer came.

    That being said, if you actively sought out this internship and wrote a long cover letter explaining how they should still consider you because you are more interested in learning than starting your career, that would change things a bit.

    I was in a similar situation to you about a year ago. I graduated Engineering School in December 09 and it took me a couple of months to find something. I had a few companies offer ridiculous contract-to-hire deals that would start off with wages 40% less than what I made as an intern. I chose to wait for something that wasn't insulting and it was the correct decision.
     
  10. Joffrey

    Joffrey Senior member

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    What I've learned is to play companies like they play their employees. Take the first oppurtunity you get, and if something much better comes along, go for it and drop the first gig. A company would rarely think twice to do the same to you.
     
  11. reil

    reil New Member

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    some companies will blacklist you if you accept then renege on an offer.
     
  12. Sazerac

    Sazerac Senior member

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    I disagree with this. Im all for putting your own interests first, but this is pretty much universally considered unethical in the recruiting world. If this kid is going through his college career department, he could get his privileges revoked.

    I definitely understand why it's considered unethical. On the other hand, it's not at all dishonest -- and this is reality. This point bears repeating: a corporation doesn't care if it makes a dick move so long as it makes a rational move, so why should you? If you accept an offer and then jump to another, better offer within a few days, some people will be inconvenienced, sure, but tough shit.

    You may be right on his being barred by the college career department. I've never used such a service, so I have no idea. Still, it's not like that's the only way to get a job. And if this other permanent position with an actual salary is someplace he wants to be, he should go for it, unrealistic ethical standards be damned.
     
  13. Joffrey

    Joffrey Senior member

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    Tough shit. The college career department will be fine as they likely have other students that'll eat a dick for that internship. Drop everything for the job if you get it.
     
  14. GreenFrog

    GreenFrog Senior member

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    I think I'm going to accept the internship offer, and if I get the full-time position, I will take that and renege with the internship.

    I feel pretty bad, as the company is very small.

    I wanted to send the full-time position company an email saying that I have an exploding offer, but my parents advise against that, saying that it makes it easier for the company to just reject me when they have a time constraint. I'd honestly rather do that instead of taking the internship and reneging.
     
  15. Joffrey

    Joffrey Senior member

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    The company will find another student to intern for them even at short notice (no doubt they'd have a 2nd best and 3rd best candidate).
     
  16. GreenFrog

    GreenFrog Senior member

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    Another hesitation I have is that I still have other interviews lined up for full-time positions. Wouldn't it be in bad taste to ask for days off so I can attend said interviews? One is as soon as this upcoming Friday and this internship begins on Monday, the 13th.
     
  17. thebac

    thebac Senior member

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    Looks like you've already made up your mind. Good luck.

    I would have contacted the full-time company and told them you have an exploding offer, but that you'd prefer the full-time company over the other offer (no need to tell them it's an internship--it's a viable offer, but one that is dominated by the full-time position). I haven't heard of companies being more likely to reject a candidate because you're asking them to make a decision more quickly. If it's a more bureaucratic place, they might tell you that they just can't get the offer out that fast given that you just interviewed two days ago, and you need to tell the other company by tomorrow, so that might still not work.

    I would ask the internship company for an extension, unless you were selling them extra hard on being super eager to start the internship there.

    I'm not a fan of reneging because even if you're dealing with corporations (and in this case it sounds like it's a small company), you're still dealing with people.

    It's also potentially risky to do so if both companies are in the same field, and that field happens to be very small. Word can easily spread in smaller fields, which can get you blacklisted in that field, not just the company you screwed over.
     
  18. GreenFrog

    GreenFrog Senior member

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    Yeah, on second thought, I think I'm going to ask for an extension. My dad thinks it's very likely I'm going to get an offer for the full-time gig, so I don't want to sign on for the internship, only to peace out after a couple of days of working there -- wast of my time and theirs.

    Edit: asked for a week extension for the internship offer.
     
  19. GreenFrog

    GreenFrog Senior member

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    Looks Like Im Declining The Internship Cuz I Just Got A Full Time Position!!!!!!!!!
     
  20. pvdnh

    pvdnh Member

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    Right on man. Congrats!

    Made my first sale today too!
     

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