A Tommy Nutter Thread

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by voxsartoria, Nov 20, 2009.

  1. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    The wild and the pure.
    [​IMG]

    What is with the gay '70s pornstar mannequin?
     
  2. voxsartoria

    voxsartoria Goon member

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    No reason except my usual tangential motives, but as long as we are mentioning Jagger, here are some 1988 pics of Jagger-era Jerry Hall from LIFE that I like...this is a good a place as any to park them:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    - B
     
  3. voxsartoria

    voxsartoria Goon member

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    [​IMG]

    What is with the gay '70s pornstar mannequin?


    1983. And Nutter was that way.


    - B
     
  4. George

    George Senior member

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    1983. And Nutter was that way.


    - B


    Interesting choice of topic. Related to the David Reeves posts?
     
  5. RJman

    RJman Posse Member Dubiously Honored

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    What is with the gay '70s pornstar mannequin?

    Ah yes, from the Stockmann "John Holmes" line.
     
  6. voxsartoria

    voxsartoria Goon member

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    Interesting choice of topic. Related to the David Reeves posts?

    Well, I have had some conversations on this topic with people from time to time, and a lot of the younger ones have little sense of how extraordinarily full of creativity, ferment, and turmoil post-war tailored fashion was in Britain, and how a lot of that was bound up in the various City and regional traditions of bespoke craftsmanship. Not to mention that British society provided a context of change that was disorienting in many ways.

    Italian and French stuff is pretty tame compared to that. Where the French stuff gets wild comes from its feminine couture traditions (at least, that's what I think.) Masculine 20th century peacockery has firmer roots in English tailoring.

    Those roots are largely bereft of flowers right now. One of the things that I find interesting about the Reeves stuff is that I think that there is a bud of this in there somewhere. The whole question of how it is executed is a different matter, but I still like seeing evidence of it in things made today.

    The universe of things that I like and appreciate is larger than the things that I would wear myself. Not everyone has this point of view.

    And what do you think of Jerry Hall in her prime? Strapping, back-breaking Texan gal. Feral and lovely.


    - B
     
  7. barims

    barims Senior member

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    Jerry also starred in Batman, so she's more than fair game here. Also, she'll keep me coming back to this thread now and again

    I have a belted leather duster coat in butterscotch from Tommy Nutter (handed down from my father, as ever) that I'm very fond of. The leather is acquiring patinas and cracking a little here and there since it saw some uncomfortable storage during the 90s

    I don't see much of Nutter and/or Sexton's work in any of the second hand shops, barring a RTW Tommy Nutter grey glen check DB suit last month at £180. I'd be better off hunting in the States

    Cheers, Bill
     
  8. George

    George Senior member

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    Well, I have had some conversations with people from time to time, and a lot of the younger ones have little sense of how extraordinarily full of creativity, ferment, and turmoil post-war tailored fashion was in Britain, and how a lot of that was bound up in the various City and regional traditions of bespoke craftsmanship.

    Italian and French stuff is pretty tame compared to that. Where the French stuff gets wild comes from its feminine couture traditions (at least, that's what I think.) Masculine 20th century peacockery has firmer roots in English tailoring.

    Those roots are largely bereft of flowers right now. One of the things that I find interesting about the Reeves stuff is that I think that there is a bud in there somewhere. The whole question of how it is executed is a different matter, but I still like seeing evidence of it in things made today.

    The universe of things that I like and appreciate is larger than the things that I would wear myself. Not everyone has this point of view.

    And what do you think of Jerry Hall in her prime? Strapping, back-breaking Texan gal.


    - B


    No, I was referring to the fact that Nutter was more of a 'front' man , Sexton was the the creative force the man with the shears.

    Jerry Hall? a very sexy lady then and now. She always reminds of the archetypal southern belle, with that drawl and long hair.

    Good topic this, I'm going to get back you as I need to digest what you've written and I struggle with the text editor on this site...!!!
     
  9. voxsartoria

    voxsartoria Goon member

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    I have a belted leather duster coat in butterscotch from Tommy Nutter (handed down from my father, as ever) that I'm very fond of. The leather is acquiring patinas and cracking a little here and there since it saw some uncomfortable storage during the 90s.

    Cool. Post a pic of it here if you ever get the chance.


    - B
     
  10. voxsartoria

    voxsartoria Goon member

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    No, I was referring to the fact that Nutter was more of a 'front' man , Sexton was the the creative force the man with the shears.

    You know, the next time I see him, I'm have to remember to ask Edwin for how it worked at Nutters with Sexton and Nutter together.

    - B
     
  11. George

    George Senior member

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    You know, the next time I see him, I'm have to remember to ask Edwin for how it worked at Nutters with Sexton and Nutter together.

    - B


    You know I've always thought that peculiar, I know tailors are a nomadic breed but DeBoise seems to be at the A&S end of the spectrum yet he apprenticed under Sexton who's an altogether more flamboyant cutter.
     
  12. voxsartoria

    voxsartoria Goon member

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    You know I've always thought that peculiar, I know tailors are a nomadic breed but DeBoise seems to be at the A&S end of the spectrum yet he apprenticed under Sexton who's an altogether more flamboyant cutter.

    On Edwin's first week at A&S coming out of Nutters, Colin Harvey (I think it was Harvey and not Halberry) asked him to draft a pattern and cut for a client, just to see what he could do and to see if he should be an undercutter to learn the A&S style. And you know back then, they did rock of eye. No block patterns; no square (Edwin still drafts this way.) Harvey also drafted a pattern for the same client as a test. Harvey was quite the old school tyrant, I believe...if he didn't like what someone cut, he would take their work and run it through his sheers and have them do it all over again.

    Harvey placed Edwin's pattern on his, and the match was essentially exact. That was enough for Harvey to assign Edwin right away as a cutter in his own right in the shop.

    So, I imagine that some degree of natural talent and education are involved. I think Edwin's father, who was also a cutter, would draft patterns directly on cloth. Edwin's brother is also a cutter, and Edwin's son is apprenticing with him right now.


    - B
     
  13. George

    George Senior member

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    On Edwin's first week at A&S coming out of Nutters, Colin Harvey (I think it was Harvey and not Halberry) asked him to draft a pattern and cut for a client, just to see what he could do and to see if he should be an undercutter to learn the A&S style. And you know back then, they did rock of eye. No block patterns; no square (Edwin still drafts this way.) Harvey also drafted a pattern for the same client as a test. Harvey was quite the old school tyrant, I believe...if he didn't like what someone cut, he would take their work and run it through his sheers and have them do it all over again. Harvey placed Edwin's pattern on his, and the match was essentially exact. That was enough for Harvey to assign Edwin right away as a cutter in his own right in the shop. So, I imagine that some degree of natural talent and education are involved. I think Edwin's father, who was also a cutter, would draft patterns directly on cloth. Edwin's brother is also a cutter, and Edwin's son is apprenticing with him right now. - B
    I heard Sexton is the best cutter there is and I've heard that off more than one tailor. The British produce the best cutters on the planet, other deficiences notwithstanding.
     
  14. comrade

    comrade Senior member

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    No reason except my usual tangential motives, but as long as we are mentioning Jagger, here are some 1988 pics of Jagger-era Jerry Hall from LIFE that I like...this is a good a place as any to park them:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    - B


    Another proof of God !
    Vox, you are a cunning proselytizer.
     
  15. George

    George Senior member

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    Well, I have had some conversations on this topic with people from time to time, and a lot of the younger ones have little sense of how extraordinarily full of creativity, ferment, and turmoil post-war tailored fashion was in Britain, and how a lot of that was bound up in the various City and regional traditions of bespoke craftsmanship. Not to mention that British society provided a context of change that was disorienting in many ways. Italian and French stuff is pretty tame compared to that. Where the French stuff gets wild comes from its feminine couture traditions (at least, that's what I think.) Masculine 20th century peacockery has firmer roots in English tailoring. Those roots are largely bereft of flowers right now. One of the things that I find interesting about the Reeves stuff is that I think that there is a bud of this in there somewhere. The whole question of how it is executed is a different matter, but I still like seeing evidence of it in things made today. The universe of things that I like and appreciate is larger than the things that I would wear myself. Not everyone has this point of view. And what do you think of Jerry Hall in her prime? Strapping, back-breaking Texan gal. Feral and lovely. - B
    There is a very long tradition of crafts in Britain as there is in Europe; you see this in the ancient guilds, many of which stem back to medieval times. The origin of the word guild I believe is German, another country where craftsmanship is deeply ingrained in the national psyche. There a spirit of rebellion in the British, and that’s what you are seeing in that tailoring, it’s rebellion, it’s a big fuck you to the establishment, tailors like Sexton were working class kids who were expressing themselves through their craft. It’s always been the working classes who’ve been the most creative in Britain, the upper classes and aristocracy provided the patronage, the middle classes did, well what the middle classes always do, just talked about it. [​IMG] Italian tailoring does nothing for me from a creative perspective. Yes, they sew a better buttonhole, but so what? Where's the flamboyance, the verve the innovation, they're too wrapped up in the concept of fare bella figura. You will not find many Brits who can afford bespoke patronising Italian tailors, too bland, nice ties though. I like the French, even though their tailoring is now non-de script, think Pierre Cardan meets Groundhog day, however, they more than make up for it in other ways. I don’t think the roots are bereft of flowers as you put it. Britain has an incredibly rich heritage of tailoring to call upon, once you’ve found your tailor you’ve just got to know which buttons to push, that’s all. You see this latent flamboyance peeking through on Savile Row with the work of Andrew Ramroop and Richard Anderson, if you spread your wings a bit farther into Soho and beyond take a look at the work of Mark Powell, Chris Kerr and numerous others, then spread your wings even further and...There’s a tremendous amount of talent and creativity out there, you just need the balls or inclination to tap into it. Yes, there is a universe of things to like, and I, like you, like many things even though I wouldn’t wear them myself. Interesting topic I hope to continue it...
     

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