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A starter tie wardrobe for a Navy Blazer

MRAnd

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Further to the excellent recommendations for the 'One' Blazer...Navy of course!
What would comprise a good basic tie wardrobe to dress up/down, winter/summer? Any particular quality brands to consider, and just as importantly, brands to steer clear of? I'll probably start with 2or 3 and add on as needed. Current need is a daytime business attire event.
 

breakaway01

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Also what is the most classic tie width?
3.25-3.5" (or 8.5-9 cm) is a very 'safe' width. 3"/8 cm is acceptable but IMO a little skinny for my taste.

As far as brands go, depends on your budget. Tie construction does matter in terms of it tying a nice knot and dimpling well. If you are willing to go up to USD $100-ish for a tie, then you have several custom options (Sam Hober, Vanda Fine Clothing, E.G. Cappelli). For less (~$75-85) I think Kent Wang ties are well made. In general, avoid shiny ties.

If I had to pick just 3 ties, considering versatility but also variety of material/color/pattern:

- a burgundy pindot tie (I am very particular about the dot size and spacing -- I think this is just about perfect)

- a wool challis or silk ancient madder, e.g. https://www.samhober.com/neckties/wool/macclesfield-challis-patterned-wool-ties/challis-macclesfield-midnight-blue-pattern-wool-tie-4brown-blue-and-off-white-on-midnight-blue-pattern-challis-wool-tie-4.html

- a solid or block stripe tie. I am partial to solid pale pink as it goes with blues and greys, and works all year round. But I could see it being too distinctive if you only have 2 or 3 ties.
 

MRAnd

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3.25-3.5" (or 8.5-9 cm) is a very 'safe' width. 3"/8 cm is acceptable but IMO a little skinny for my taste.

As far as brands go, depends on your budget. Tie construction does matter in terms of it tying a nice knot and dimpling well. If you are willing to go up to USD $100-ish for a tie, then you have several custom options (Sam Hober, Vanda Fine Clothing, E.G. Cappelli). For less (~$75-85) I think Kent Wang ties are well made. In general, avoid shiny ties.

If I had to pick just 3 ties, considering versatility but also variety of material/color/pattern:

- a burgundy pindot tie (I am very particular about the dot size and spacing -- I think this is just about perfect)

- a wool challis or silk ancient madder, e.g. https://www.samhober.com/neckties/wool/macclesfield-challis-patterned-wool-ties/challis-macclesfield-midnight-blue-pattern-wool-tie-4brown-blue-and-off-white-on-midnight-blue-pattern-challis-wool-tie-4.html

- a solid or block stripe tie. I am partial to solid pale pink as it goes with blues and greys, and works all year round. But I could see it being too distinctive if you only have 2 or 3 ties.
Thank you. Very helpful.
Yes I forget to mention budget but >$100 is perfectly in line.
 

adrianvo

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Most versatile imo:

Burgundy:


Brown:


Go for no less than 8cm in width, but preferably 8.5cm+.
Although brown ties are one of the most versatile in my opinion, it's actually not as easy to find as other colors.
 

dieworkwear

Mahatma Jawndi
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Your tie width should be proportional to your lapels. If your lapels are 3.5" wide, then you should get a tie that's 3.5" wide. It doesn't have to exactly match, but it should be in the vicinity. And your lapel width should be proportional to your jacket. For a classic look, your lapels should be about halfway to your shoulder seam. Think about the overall proportions of your entire outfit, not just the width of the tie alone.

I think foulards are best kept to suits. Foulard is a Macclesfield term for small, repeating geometric patterns, such as the ones @adrianvo posted above. Personally would not wear those with sport coats. If you're aiming for a versatile tie to be worn with sport coats, I would do a striped silk tie in a basic, dark color such as navy, burgundy, or chocolate brown.

As your tie collection grows, I think it helps to think about seasonality, pattern, color saturation, and texture.


navyblazer.jpg
darkdonegal.jpg



Seasonality: For example, the two sport coats above are made from fall/winter fabrics. The navy DB sport coat is made from Fox serge. The brown single-breasted sport coat is made from Molloy & Sons brown Donegal. With such seasonal coats, I think it's nice to have a seasonal tie. The navy sport coat is paired with a brown ancient madder; the brown Donegal is paired with a striped boucle. In the spring/summer months, you can go with linen or raw silk. These seasonal ties can also be worn with basic four-season suits and sport coats if you want to give your outfit a seasonal touch (e.g. a navy hopsack sport coat with a madder tie).

herringbonetweed-1024x764.jpg
donegaltweed.jpg



Pattern and Texture: If your sport coats are mostly patterned, consider getting textured, but solid colored ties. I find this helps remove just one element from your dress in the morning, which makes getting dressed easier, as you don't have to coordinate too many patterns. With a patterned sport coat and striped shirt, you can always wear a solid colored, textured tie. The texture lends visual interest, but the solid color doesn't clash with the patterns. If your sport coats are mostly solid, then consider getting patterned ties to add visual interest. The above: a brown herringbone sport coat with a solid blue cashmere tie, then another Donegal with a patterned wool challis.

corduroyjacket.jpg



Color Saturation and Temperature: For a small neckwear wardrobe, you're always better off with basic colors such as navy, burgundy, and chocolate brown. But sometimes these colors can vary in terms of saturation and temperature. Navy can lean very cold or warm depending on the addition of red tones (a warm navy leans purple-ish). Most men are better off with cold tones, but as your collection grows, think about how saturation and temperature can liven up a look. Above is a brown corduroy suit with a very saturated, warm-toned orange wool challis tie. Not something you can wear every day, but nice for something like Thanksgiving dinner.


tumblr_mic27mBfEO1qa2j8co1_1280.jpg



Some of this stuff can be a bit too complicated to think about when you're just building a wardrobe. So I would stick to: buy dark colors such as navy, burgundy, and chocolate brown. Stick to classic patterns. And consider sticking foulards to just suits, and then using striped ties for suits and sport coats. Ties have thier own formality. In the photo above, I've laid out some ties with various levels of formality -- foulard (suit ties, IMO), striped and grenadines (can be worn with suits or sport coats), and then some casual ties (cashmere for fall/winter and a black silk knit for year-round).
 

MaE

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Just a quick question regarding (knit) ties:

A non-knit RTW tie usually measures about 8 to 8,5cm in width at its widest point while a knit tie (due to its straight shape) usually isn't as wide. What is considered to be a normal/good width for a straight knit-tie? +/- 6cm?

Thanks in advance,

MaE
 

circumspice

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Sure. Some dudes bug out with the narrowness of the traditional square end knit ties, but there are some diamond shaped knit ties out there now. I would generally say that you are either in or out with square end knit ties - I don't think there are really skinny ones out there, and the standard ones are 5ish cm, maybe 6. You are probably into or not into the look, cm +/- be damned.

I think there is one Italian maker whose square end ties are a bit wider, Stoffa's were made by them, but since Stoffa doesn't sell accessories any more on their web shop, I don't have a point of reference for width.

TLDR - knit ties = it's the shape not the width that torments or delights
 

adrianvo

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Who needs knit ties when you have grenadine ties? Better looking, more versatile, and classier in my opnion.
 

dieworkwear

Mahatma Jawndi
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Just a quick question regarding (knit) ties:

A non-knit RTW tie usually measures about 8 to 8,5cm in width at its widest point while a knit tie (due to its straight shape) usually isn't as wide. What is considered to be a normal/good width for a straight knit-tie? +/- 6cm?

Thanks in advance,

MaE
I have knit ties that are wider and skinnier, and wear them both equally. It's supposed to be a casual, floppy tie. I wouldn't sweat it. Just buy from a brand you like and a color you like. I consider them party ties.

One more thing: if you're buying your first one, get black. A black silk knit tie will go with any outfit that can be worn with a silk knit tie. It's surprisingly the most versatile color for this style.
 
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circumspice

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Who needs knit ties when you have grenadine ties? Better looking, more versatile, and classier in my opnion.
This is like "Who needs brown suede shoes when black calfskin captoes are available?"

For those of us who think grenadines are only for suits, they are not more, but rather less versatile than knits. Realize in the world of grenadine fandom, there are some who find grossa too avant-garde, probably because they think grossas have too much texture a la knit ties.

I am pro grossa grenadines, but I still view them as exclusively suit ties.
 

adrianvo

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This is like "Who needs brown suede shoes when black calfskin captoes are available?"

For those of us who think grenadines are only for suits, they are not more, but rather less versatile than knits. Realize in the world of grenadine fandom, there are some who find grossa too avant-garde, probably because they think grossas have too much texture a la knit ties.

I am pro grossa grenadines, but I still view them as exclusively suit ties.
False equivalence.
In this case it is you who (choose to) lack versatility, and not the tie.

I'm open to discuss the aesthetics of the tie with a suit or whatever, but not your (or the "grenadine fandom's") subjective opinion on what you "view them as".
If it looks good, it looks good. I won't die by "style rules", only aesthetics.
 

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