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A Beginner's Guide to MC. Look here once before posting.

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by pvrhye, Mar 14, 2011.

  1. TRINI

    TRINI Senior member

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    Quarters, as in "open quarters" and "closed quarters" are terms that I have never heard used outside the internet forum. They are not used within the trade or by tailors (except the few iTailors around). So I might suggest that if you went to a tailor and asked for open quarters he may not know what you are talking about.

    I have been hearing tailors say this for 20 years, in London and New York.

    Have you been hearing them say 'quarters' for 20 years or have you been hearing tailors say that they haven't ever heard the term 'quarters' for 20 years?


    [​IMG]
     
  2. pvrhye

    pvrhye Senior member

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    Quarters, as in "open quarters" and "closed quarters" are terms that I have never heard used outside the internet forum. They are not used within the trade or by tailors (except the few iTailors around). So I might suggest that if you went to a tailor and asked for open quarters he may not know what you are talking about.

    You may or may not be right on this one, but In my defense, this is intended more as a guide to these boards than clothing in general. I've also never heard another term for it.
     
  3. merkur

    merkur Senior member

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    ..
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2011
  4. Srynerson

    Srynerson Senior member

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    I vote in favor of "sticky-ing" this thread and hopefully one or more of the mods will be kind enough to occasionally revise/update the OP in response to reader feedback.
     
  5. Wayward

    Wayward Senior member

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    What about a ranking of the difficulty/price for different tailoring jobs, so that when people buy RTW suits they know what needs to be bang on and what can be altered later? For example, some of the most intensive jobs I know of:

    - anything with shoulders
    - correcting sleeve pitch
    - altering sleeve lengths w/ surgeon's cuffs
    - lengthening/shortening jacket

    Much easier/cheaper jobs:

    - adjusting pants waist or seat
    - altering sleeve length without surgeon's cuffs
    - reshaping the back of collar to sit flush with your neck

    Just off the top of my head. Others care to develop this?
     
  6. contrarycomet

    contrarycomet Member

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    +1
     
  7. pvrhye

    pvrhye Senior member

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    What about a ranking of the difficulty/price for different tailoring jobs, so that when people buy RTW suits they know what needs to be bang on and what can be altered later? For example, some of the most intensive jobs I know of:

    - anything with shoulders
    - correcting sleeve pitch
    - altering sleeve lengths w/ surgeon's cuffs
    - lengthening/shortening jacket

    Much easier/cheaper jobs:

    - adjusting pants waist or seat
    - altering sleeve length without surgeon's cuffs
    - reshaping the back of collar to sit flush with your neck

    Just off the top of my head. Others care to develop this?


    I'd be more or less talking out of my ass on the subject. Start a new thread about the topic though and I'd be happy to link it.
     
  8. either/or

    either/or Senior member

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    +1 to a beginners guide to MC alterations [​IMG]
     
  9. Cant kill da Rooster

    Cant kill da Rooster Senior member

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    [Oxfords - Oxfords are referred to in different ways based on certain key features.
    If the laces appear to be overlaid over the upper it's called a Derby or blucher. If they're divided only by a seam, it's called a balmoral.


    If I am reading this right, it is incorrect. A balmoral and oxford are the same thing. A blucher is not a type of oxford.
     
  10. radicaldog

    radicaldog Senior member

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    If I am reading this right, it is incorrect. A balmoral and oxford are the same thing. A blucher is not a type of oxford.
    Correct. Balmoral (US) = Oxford (UK) = closed lacing. Blucher (US) = Derby (UK) = open lacing. It's just that in the US some people use 'Oxford' for all laced shoes. Edit that and please pin this thread.
     
  11. Cant kill da Rooster

    Cant kill da Rooster Senior member

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  12. pvrhye

    pvrhye Senior member

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    Correct. Balmoral (US) = Oxford (UK) = closed lacing. Blucher (US) = Derby (UK) = open lacing. It's just that in the US some people use 'Oxford' for all laced shoes. Edit that and please pin this thread.

    [
    B]Lace-ups[/b] - Lace-ups are referred to in different ways based on certain key features.
    If the laces appear to be overlaid over the upper it's called a derby or blucher. If they're divided only by a seam, it's called a balmoral or oxford. The toes can be a plain continuous piece of leather (plaintoe), have a separate cap over them (captoes) or a different kind of cap that forms a sweeping W shape (wingtip). Decorative holes punched in the leather are call broguing. If the wingtip circles entirely around the shoe, it's called a longwing.


    Lace-ups sound like a better heading?
     
  13. joneog

    joneog Well-Known Member

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    New York
    A list of fabric patterns (gingham, herringbone etc.) - with descriptions or pictures - may be helpful.
     
  14. pvrhye

    pvrhye Senior member

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    A list of fabric patterns (gingham, herringbone etc.) - with descriptions or pictures - may be helpful.

    That seems like the kind of thing that would need a slough of pictures to accomplish, so I think it's probably best saved for another thread. Make such a thread and I'll add the link.
     

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