1. Hi, I'm the owner and main administrator of Styleforum. If you find the forum useful and fun, please help support it by buying through the posted links on the forum. Our main, very popular sales thread, where the latest and best sales are listed, are posted HERE

    Purchases made through some of our links earns a commission for the forum and allows us to do the work of maintaining and improving it. Finally, thanks for being a part of this community. We realize that there are many choices today on the internet, and we have all of you to thank for making Styleforum the foremost destination for discussions of menswear.

2018 50 Book Challenge

Discussion in 'Entertainment, Culture, and Sports' started by edinatlanta, Dec 23, 2010.

  1. California Dreamer

    California Dreamer Distinguished Member

    Messages:
    6,305
    Likes Received:
    2,306
    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2006
    Location:
    Melbourne
    62. Home Time: Under the River, by Campbell Whyte

    In Home Time a group of Perth kids are celebrating their last day of primary school with a big sleepover party. On their way there is an accident and they fall into the river. Instead of drowning they wake up in a fantastical world under the river, where the local people, the Peaches, mistake them for spirits that have arrived to help them.

    Whyte has a fertile imagination and the book bristles with the odd and strange. There are echoes of Narnia, Roald Dahl, Snugglepot and Cuddlepie and other children's classics, and he is also clearly inspired by video games. The artwork shifts in styles from sepia drawings to pixellated platform games to oil paintings. The book is flawed, however, by the absence of the supposed villains, the lizards, who you'd think would have at least put in an appearance in the first part of the story. The ending leaves plenty of scope for further plot development, and it will be interesting to see where Whyte takes this.
     

  2. LonerMatt

    LonerMatt Distinguished Member

    Messages:
    2,533
    Likes Received:
    1,381
    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2012
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    1. Kangaroo
    2. South of the Border, West of the Sun
    3. 19Q4
    4. An Elegant Young Man
    5. Throne of the Crescent Moon
    6. When Gravity Fails
    7. The Choke
    8. Heat and Light
    9. Who Owns the Future
    10 Waking Gods
    11. Wimmera
    12. Artemis
    13. Fire in the Sun
    14. Exile Kiss
    15. A Long Way to a Small Angry Planet
    16 Prisoners of Geography
    17. Nevermoor
    18 La Bell Sauvage
    19. Red Sister
    20. Jade City
    21. We Are Who We Pretend To Be
    22. First Person
    23. Too Like Lightning
    24. Sea of Rust
    25. Don't Skip Out on Me
    26. Autonomous
    27. Grey Sister
    28. The Free
    29. Lean on Pete
    30. Clade
    31. The Shepard's Hut
    32. The Soul of an Octopus
    33. The Dog Stars
    34. At the mouth of River Bees
    35. Dragon's Teeth
    36. Designing Your Life
    37. Deep Work
    38. So Good They Can't Ignore You
    39. Low Town
    40. The Girl with all the Gifts
    41. The Dismissal Dossier
    42. The Last Garden
    43. Storyland
    44. Wolfblade
    45. Warrior
    46. Home Fire
    47. Warlord
    48. The Lyre Thief
    49. Down to the River
    50. Retribution
    51. Me, Early and the Dying Girl
    52. 84k
    53. Snap
    54. The Haters
    55. Codename Villanelle
    56. Those Above
    57. Those Below
    58. Of a Boy
    59. Publish your Photography Book
    60. Spinning Silver
    61. Record of a Spaceborn Few

    61. Record of a Spaceborn Few

    Over the last few years Becky Chambers has carved out a name for herself in writing very heartfelt speculative fiction. Instead of focusing on the large changes and the galaxy saving problems, Chambers writes about very individual struggles set among a Universe populated by sentient beings.

    In her latest novel she really pushes this concept to the limit - instead of a narrative there are several shorter arcs of different humans all struggling with the new human condition. Humans are barely accepted as members of the Galactic Union, many thinking that they do not deserve recognition. Humans are not special, capable or strong, and rely on the technology and advances of other races.

    Among this the human 'homeland' is a fleet of ships which is quasi communist and very communal, yet limited and cloistered for all that.

    So the story rambles a bit, is a bit preachy and a bit too kumbayah for me. I liked Chambers earlier books as they were very inventive and had a lot of non-human elements, but this one just felt like cliched and predictable short stories but set in space, and one wonders what's the point? Nothing is really said.
     

  3. archibaldleach

    archibaldleach Distinguished Member

    Messages:
    5,387
    Likes Received:
    2,351
    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2006
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    64. Davis, Jack - Gulf: The Making of an American Sea - A sort of history of the Gulf of Mexico. There are some interesting characters and anecdotes, but I wasn't particularly blown away by the book. Decent enough prose, though.

    That one got me to 30,000 pages worth of books, my goal for the year 2 months early.
     

  4. California Dreamer

    California Dreamer Distinguished Member

    Messages:
    6,305
    Likes Received:
    2,306
    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2006
    Location:
    Melbourne
    Congrats archibaldleach. That's great going, and it's not lightweight stuff that you're reading either.
     

  5. archibaldleach

    archibaldleach Distinguished Member

    Messages:
    5,387
    Likes Received:
    2,351
    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2006
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    ^ Thank you, sir. It feels good to not be crawling across the finish line at the last minute this year. I've found the trick is to have just enough semi-light stuff to keep going. Well written biographies and histories can be a lot of fun to read too and tend to go faster than the really dense stuff, but still let one learn a lot for the effort.
     

  6. California Dreamer

    California Dreamer Distinguished Member

    Messages:
    6,305
    Likes Received:
    2,306
    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2006
    Location:
    Melbourne
    63. The Lost City of the Monkey God, by Douglas Preston

    Douglas Preston's book is an account of an expedition that he was the resident journalist on, to find the fabled lost city of Ciudad Blanca in Honduras. Myths have it that the city was abandoned and a curse placed on it by a monkey god.

    Preston writes about past efforts - some more genuine than others - to locate Ciudad Blanca and then describes how modern military technology was used to conduct an aerial search of impenetrable jungle, which revealed the likely presence of some major Mesoamerican construction sites. Preston then formed part of the expedition that flew in to get a better look at what they had seen from the air.

    Writing for a general audience, Preston focuses more on the boy's own derring-do aspects of the story, with lots of encounters with snakes and other critters, appalling weather and even a curse of sorts. On that level this is an absorbing and interesting read, but I would have preferred to learn more about the archaeological and anthropological significance of what they discovered there. It may be that there is not yet enough work done on these sites for much to be written about that, and hopefully there will be another book sometime that tells us more about the finds than the finding of them.
     

  7. noob in 89

    noob in 89 Distinguished Member

    Messages:
    8,958
    Likes Received:
    10,267
    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2010
    The Stories of Heinrich Böll...

    ...is a massive 1986 hardback with a cool vintage cover, encased in plastic, containing every short story he ever wrote, mostly detailing WWII-era Germany in an abundance of styles. I can’t remember which book won him the big prize, but this is surely just as good, maybe better.
     

  8. California Dreamer

    California Dreamer Distinguished Member

    Messages:
    6,305
    Likes Received:
    2,306
    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2006
    Location:
    Melbourne
    The Nobel is given for an author's body of work, not for any specific book. (Or song, in the case of a recent descent into populist madness).
     

  9. noob in 89

    noob in 89 Distinguished Member

    Messages:
    8,958
    Likes Received:
    10,267
    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2010
    Ha, well that explains it. I was thinking it was like the Pulitzer for some reason..
     

  10. LonerMatt

    LonerMatt Distinguished Member

    Messages:
    2,533
    Likes Received:
    1,381
    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2012
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    1. Kangaroo
    2. South of the Border, West of the Sun
    3. 19Q4
    4. An Elegant Young Man
    5. Throne of the Crescent Moon
    6. When Gravity Fails
    7. The Choke
    8. Heat and Light
    9. Who Owns the Future
    10 Waking Gods
    11. Wimmera
    12. Artemis
    13. Fire in the Sun
    14. Exile Kiss
    15. A Long Way to a Small Angry Planet
    16 Prisoners of Geography
    17. Nevermoor
    18 La Bell Sauvage
    19. Red Sister
    20. Jade City
    21. We Are Who We Pretend To Be
    22. First Person
    23. Too Like Lightning
    24. Sea of Rust
    25. Don't Skip Out on Me
    26. Autonomous
    27. Grey Sister
    28. The Free
    29. Lean on Pete
    30. Clade
    31. The Shepard's Hut
    32. The Soul of an Octopus
    33. The Dog Stars
    34. At the mouth of River Bees
    35. Dragon's Teeth
    36. Designing Your Life
    37. Deep Work
    38. So Good They Can't Ignore You
    39. Low Town
    40. The Girl with all the Gifts
    41. The Dismissal Dossier
    42. The Last Garden
    43. Storyland
    44. Wolfblade
    45. Warrior
    46. Home Fire
    47. Warlord
    48. The Lyre Thief
    49. Down to the River
    50. Retribution
    51. Me, Early and the Dying Girl
    52. 84k
    53. Snap
    54. The Haters
    55. Codename Villanelle
    56. Those Above
    57. Those Below
    58. Of a Boy
    59. Publish your Photography Book
    60. Spinning Silver
    61. Record of a Spaceborn Few
    62. Dayzone

    62. Dayzone


    In a city there is eternal day and eternal night with dusk in the middle. A time obsessed place, everyone keeps their own time and watches are a necessity. Freed from the tyranny of a single time everyone scurries around on their own time, or a time of their choosing.

    Nyquist, a grizzled and unwell PI, is tasked with finding the run away daughter of the richest man in town. Except his daughter isn't all that she appears. A grueling search and cat and mouse takes up the majority of the book with some Lynch-esque scenes to wrap it all up.

    I felt that this book could have been significantly more than it was, there's a lot of different plates spinning and ways to make them all amazing, yet it was almost less than the sum of its parts.
     

  11. Lionel Hutz

    Lionel Hutz Distinguished Member

    Messages:
    6,136
    Likes Received:
    2,371
    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2017
    hands off Robert Zimmerman dude

    waltersobcheck.gif
     

  12. California Dreamer

    California Dreamer Distinguished Member

    Messages:
    6,305
    Likes Received:
    2,306
    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2006
    Location:
    Melbourne
    Give the guy a Grammy if you like his music; the Nobel Prize for Literature is for, er, literature.
     

  13. Journeyman

    Journeyman Distinguished Member

    Messages:
    7,067
    Likes Received:
    2,078
    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2005
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    Well, to be fair to Bob, the Nobel Prize for Literature is also awarded for poetry and some song lyrics are poetic (especially considering that pretty much anything can be regarded as a poem nowadays - no need to worry about rhythm or rhyme schemes in modern poetry!).

    Having said that, though, I do think that it was a pretty crap decision by the Academy.
     

  14. California Dreamer

    California Dreamer Distinguished Member

    Messages:
    6,305
    Likes Received:
    2,306
    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2006
    Location:
    Melbourne
    I'm just outraged that Madonna missed out. Neil Tennant described her as the world's best lyricist, who always gets the emphasis on the right syllable. It's a disgrace that she was overlooked for Kazuo Ishiguro last year, and this year they are not even giving one; what an insult to the Queen of Pop!
     

  15. Foxhound

    Foxhound Distinguished Member

    Messages:
    2,971
    Likes Received:
    2,289
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2013
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    Hit 50 yesterday.

    Will update thread soon.
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies, our Privacy Policy, and Terms and Conditions.