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2017 50 Book Challenge

Discussion in 'Entertainment, Culture, and Sports' started by edinatlanta, Dec 23, 2010.

  1. Steve B.

    Steve B. Senior member

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    12. Matagordo 1967 Louis L'Amour

    A man rides into a Texas town to meet a friend from the Civil War. They plan to make money by driving cattle to Kansas.

    Problem is the gentleman has walked into a full-blown feud. He becomes involved reluctantly.

    Bad guys lose, good guys win, and our hero gets the girl.
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2014
  2. LonerMatt

    LonerMatt Senior member

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    1. All Tomorrow's Parties
    2. Undivided: Part 3
    3. High Fidelity
    4. Hard Boiled Wonderland at the End of the World
    5. Polysyllabic Spree
    6. Armageddon in Retrospect
    7. South of the Border, West of the Sun
    8. What we talk about when we talk about love
    9. Norweigan Wood

    9. Norweigan Wood

    Loved Norweigan Wood. Very soulful, very interesting, very beautiful. I really enjoyed how it was basically a love story, but told without pretentiousness - the characters are matter-of-fact, their situations are simultaneously simple and complex, nothing is gained without something being lost. While there was a certain element of the dramatic (really, THAT many suicides?), I didn't really mind at all. As a story that's both coming-of-age, romantic, reflective and internally autobiographical (the main character reliving his past) it was incredibly deep, but delightfully accessible.

    Almost as great as South of the Border, West of the Sun.

    Some favourite lines:

    "I don't want to talk to you," she said.
    Her friend with glasses looked at me with eyes that said: she doesn't want to talk to you. Sorry.

    We were like kids that grew up naked on a desert island. If we were hungry, we'd eat a banana; if we got lonely, we'd go to sleep in each others' arms. But that kind of thing doesn't last forever.
     
  3. klewless

    klewless Senior member

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    klewless book 3/50: The Last Dead Girl by Harry Dolan

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    This is the 3rd title in the David Loogan series. Set up as a prequel this tale develops the backstory for the main character, explaining who he is, and where he came from. For those not familiar with Mr. Dolan, his writing is fantastic, and almost feels noir in style. I highly recommend this series, he is getting better with age. Two very enthusiastic thumbs up.
     
  4. klewless

    klewless Senior member

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    klewless book 4/50: POINT & SHOOT by Duane Swierczynski


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    This is the 3rd book in the Charlie Hardie series. If you have ever wondered what it would be like to try and read a comic book as a novel, this is it. The series starts out strong, and the first 2 books are fast, enjoyable reads. This last one was just as rapidly paced, however lacked the conclusion that will satisfy most readers. This is probably a series that can be completed over a weekend or long flight, just make sure to read them in order.
     
  5. LonerMatt

    LonerMatt Senior member

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    I've read the Rebel (or The Outsider, as my version is known) and The Plague, am familiar with Myth, but haven't read it. Might grab it, the autobiography yoou're talking about and some more Satre for my French philosophy kick in mid 2014.
     
  6. Geoffrey Firmin

    Geoffrey Firmin Senior member

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    Interesting never seen the Rebel titled as the Outsider which is actually the title of a short novel. Here is a link to a pdf of The Rebel http://www.lightforcenetwork.com/sites/default/files/Camus - The Rebel.pdf

    Don't bother with Sartre in philosophical terms, he gets more across philosophically in the novels. However that said I would recommend The Transcendence of the Ego, ( i have to read it again this year) forget Being and Nothingness. If want to read French Philosophy send me a PM and there is some stimulating works I can recommend the issue is that you need to engage in discourse with someone to get the full benefit from reading it. By the way read Descartes Meditations?
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2014
  7. Journeyman

    Journeyman Senior member

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    I read "Being and Nothingness" at university and, whilst interesting, I found it to be fairly heavy going and it took me a few weeks to get through it (reading a bit, taking a break and reading something else, then going back to it again).

    I did, however, enjoy reading Sartre's autobiographical work "Words".

    As GF says, Sartre's "non-philosophical" works (ie novels or autobiographical works that are not overtly philosophical) still contain a lot of philosophy and clearly illustrate Sartre's worldview.
     
  8. LonerMatt

    LonerMatt Senior member

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    Only Satre I've read is 'Existentialism is a humanism' - was thinking of grabbing 'Nausea' and having a go.

    I'm able to read hello-kitty philosophy.
     
  9. Geoffrey Firmin

    Geoffrey Firmin Senior member

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    Pussy Philosophy? Sounds nice.

    Nausea is one of my favourite books and its worth reading the Roads to Freedom trilogy.
     
  10. noob in 89

    noob in 89 Senior member

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    Yeah, Nausea is like the one book that is rote philosophy without feeling like rote philosophy. Very sensuous and 3-D, unlike those long Russian novels where the characters are just ventriloquist's dummies or cardboard cut-outs standing in for Big Ideas. So....thumbs up for Sartre. A synchronized reading might be fun.

    .​
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2014
  11. noob in 89

    noob in 89 Senior member

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    [​IMG]




    #4 PORNOGRAFIA , by Witold Gombrowicz (1960)

    On a cold September evening, in the year of our lord 193_, Poland's preeminent novelist, provocateur, and enfant terrible, Witold Gombrovicz was dreaming of the beach. He had just boarded a cruise ship and set sail for Argentina, a dreamy summerland where he would drop sandward and and pigmentize with his fellow countrymen, spoon them wine, and assure them of a safe return to Poland, now rebuilt and even flourishing after the messy business of World War I. Halfway across the ocean, he received the news: Germany, those bastards, had invaded Poland. Again. And thus, Gombrowicz's beach-side stay stretched from one month to twenty-four years. He would never set foot on his native soil again. This novel, Pornografia, tells the story of his return. It's 194_. Poland is occupied, and an aging intellectual named Witold Gombrovicz travels to a sleepy countryside village. Here, he meets Henia and Karol -- a pair of sixteen year-olds who exude sexuality, who radiate youth -- and becomes obsessed with the idea that they belong together -- even though Henia is engaged to an older man. Witold's fixations are exacerbated by Frydryk, a friend who joins in his antics just as a refugee from the Underground Army decides to crash their village.

    Gombrowicz is the summarizer's torment. Like all his books, this one is silly and deep, acrobatic and fun. Dazzling, but not showy. Serious, but not foreboding. My rating: 9/10. Would smash again.
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2014
  12. Steve B.

    Steve B. Senior member

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    13. Perfume Patrick Suskind 1986

    [COLOR=FF00AA]LIST[/COLOR]

    A dark and sinister young man becomes a perfume maker although he has no odor of his own but has the finest nose in all of France. He sets about making the perfect perfume, but has to kill 25 young women to do it.

    An excellent book. Movie in the mid 00s which I thought was equally good.
     
  13. California Dreamer

    California Dreamer Senior member

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    I seem incapable of finishing a book this year. That is all.
     
  14. clockwise

    clockwise Senior member

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    I am reading a 675-pager from 1864. It is surprisingly good but it has also slowed me down a lot. Women, children, tailors, business meetings, mates demanding that I stay for a last round - all are impediments to leisurely enjoyment of literature. Just lucky I am not into gambling or opium.
     
  15. noob in 89

    noob in 89 Senior member

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    [​IMG]



    #5 YOUNG ADAM, by Alexander Trocchi (1954)


    Virtually forgotten by his death in 1984, Alexander Trocchi's Young Adam was one of the great beneficiaries of Rebel Inc's assault on the Scottish literary canon during the 90s. But it took David Mackenzie's excellent film adaptation, with Ewan McGregor in the lead role, to deliver the long overdue readership and reassessment of this modern masterpiece....

    link

    (Other projects beckon, so I'll just leave this here and say that this one was really good, and you should totally read it).
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2014
  16. LonerMatt

    LonerMatt Senior member

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    Such sadness in my heart.
     
  17. Steve B.

    Steve B. Senior member

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    14. Heller with a Gun Louis L'Amour 1955

    A man is hired to guard a traveling minstrel show, After battles with Indians and the original guide, our hero triumphs. a supporting role to the elements.
     
  18. California Dreamer

    California Dreamer Senior member

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    Thank you Matt. Your sincerity shines through every keystroke.

    I must read Young Adam, given it's the name of an ancestor of mine (i.e. Adam Young).
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2014
  19. klewless

    klewless Senior member

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    Klewless book 5/50: Silence of the Wave by Gianrico Carofiglio

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    A very somber tale of a life lived in a psychological gray area. The protagonist is an Italian Carabinieri officer on medical leave, whose twice weekly visits to his therapist are the only observable measures of normalcy. The reader relives his mental truama through the therapy, and witnesses his struggle to rejoin society. This was a bit dark, and is intended to be more entertainment then anything else. It succeeeds in that effort, and is an enjoyable tale.
     
  20. California Dreamer

    California Dreamer Senior member

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    6. After You with the Pistol
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    After You with the Pistol
    by Kyril Bonfiglioli
    My rating: 4 of 5 stars

    The second of Bonfigliolis' Mortdecai books picks up immediately from the first, with the dissolute and shady art dealer in the clutches of various agencies who wish him harm. He manages to extricate himself by promising to marry the gorgeous Johanna and keep tabs on her activities.

    Johanna manipulates Mortdecai into a series of increasingly dubious activities from assassinating the Queen, training at a camp for lesbian warriors and smuggling heroin out of China. As the plot proceeds it just gets sillier and sillier, serving mainly as a vehicle for Mortdecai to toss off a series of acid observations, which keep the laughs coming.

    After You with the Pistol is pure fluff, but very enjoyable and well-executed fluff. There's a lot of Wodehouse in Bonfiglioli's characters, and he makes reference to Jeeves and Wooster several times, so it's clear they are among his inspirations. These books are a bit more manic than the Jeeves stories, but lovers of Wodehouse would probably enjoy them.

    View all my reviews
     
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