2017 50 Book Challenge

Discussion in 'Entertainment, Culture, and Sports' started by edinatlanta, Dec 23, 2010.

  1. California Dreamer

    California Dreamer Senior member

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    Was there a real Mr Gorski? I have to admit reading "Gonski" half the time.
     


  2. Geoffrey Firmin

    Geoffrey Firmin Senior member

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    28 Nineteen Eighty Four by George Orwell The Penguin Modern Classics 1974 edition.
    War is Peace
    Freedom is Slavery
    Ignorance is Strength
    "The" classic 20th century dystopian vision of a nightmare world of totalitarian rule. Expertly crafted and written and still as vibrant and chilling when I first (and only) read it forty years ago.

    Highly recommended.
     


  3. Geoffrey Firmin

    Geoffrey Firmin Senior member

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    When Apollo Mission Astronaut Neil Armstrong first walked on the moon, he not only gave his famous “One small step for man; one giant leap for mankind” statement, but followed it by several remarks, including the usual COM traffic between him, the other astronauts, and Mission Control. Before he re-entered the lander, he made the enigmatic remark “Good luck, Mr. Gorsky.”
    Many people at NASA thought it was a casual remark concerning some rival Soviet Cosmonaut. However, upon checking, [they found] there was no Gorsky in either the Russian or American space programs.
    Over the years, many people have questioned him as to what the “Good luck, Mr. Gorsky”statement meant. On July 5, in Tampa Bay, FL, while answering questions following a speech, a reporter brought up the 26- year-old question to Armstrong. He finally responded. It seems that Mr. Gorsky had died and so Armstrong felt he could answer the question. When he was a kid, Neil was playing baseball with his brother in the backyard. His brother hit a fly ball which landed in front of his neighbors’ bedroom window. The neighbors were Mr. and Mrs. Gorsky. As he leaned down to pick up the ball, he heard Mrs. Gorsky shouting at Mr. Gorsky, “Oral sex? Oral sex you want? You’ll get oral sex when the kid next door walks on the moon!”
     


  4. California Dreamer

    California Dreamer Senior member

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    That sounds like a big urban myth to me.
     


  5. California Dreamer

    California Dreamer Senior member

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    If you want a vision of the future, imagine a boot stamping on a human face - forever
    Now that is chilling.
     


  6. Geoffrey Firmin

    Geoffrey Firmin Senior member

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    It is. You would be surprised at the amount of people over the years who think it's true. A second year uni student tried to pass it off as part of their coursework many years past. Gave them a fail.
     


  7. California Dreamer

    California Dreamer Senior member

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    43. Smashing It Up: A Decade of Chaos with The Damned, by Kieron Tyler

    Kieron Tyler leaves the reader in little doubt that The Damned were a hugely under-rated band whose influence spread from the gestation of both punk and goth music to later US rockers such as The Replacements, Nirvana and Guns 'n' Roses. Despite their pioneering influence, The Damned has tended to be sidelined and belittled by the mainstream; Tyler's book is an excellent attempt to set the record straight. As he suggest, it may not give us the complete truth, but it brings us closer to the truth than we were before.

    The book has been phenomenally well-researched. Tyler has relied heavily on interviews done with band members and others directly involved, either by himself or quoted directly from contemporaneous sources. This lends a feel of both immediacy and authenticity to the band's story.

    And what a story it is. Tyler starts off by placing us firmly in the nascent punk rock scene in London, before the term even existed, documents how the four founding members came together, and the musical influences that led them to record the pioneering and then-shocking New Rose. He then takes us chronologically through the band's tumultuous career over several decades, a career that persists to this day.

    Throughout, the reader is left wondering how these people managed to survive the largely self-inflicted damage that they personally and the band endured. It's astonishing to think that all four founding members survived in the industry for decades after arising from a milieu where bands only lasted for a few years at most, and which claimed the lives of many of its foremost practitioners. Given the level of self-destruction chronicled here, that is truly amazing.

    I enjoyed this book hugely, and found myself constantly jumping onto the internet to listen again to the songs that Tyler was discussing, which often clarified the story he was telling and added to my enjoyment of the book. If I had a quibble it would be that Tyler's chronology sometimes gets confusing and he seems to repeat himself; for example, an account of the recording of Anything appears twice. Overall, however, Tyler definitely succeeds in his objective of restoring The Damned and its members to their rightful place in modern music history.
     


  8. Geoffrey Firmin

    Geoffrey Firmin Senior member

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    29 HOW DID WE GET INTO THIS MESS? Politics,Equality,Nature by George Monbiot
    A curated collection of short articles by a progressive journalist who writes a weekly column for the Guardian. Topical thought provoking commentary on a range of ills and some interesting solutions which beset the planet and its human inhabitants.

    You may not agree with everything he writes but it should provide the reader with numerous pause for thought moments.
    Recommend.
     


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