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Would you choose your career again

Discussion in 'Business, Careers & Education' started by Mr Herbert, Sep 17, 2010.

  1. mafoofan

    mafoofan Well-Known Member

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    We here bad stroies about lawyers everywhere. But down here in Charleston, many of them are gentlemen, or else very talented actors.
    I'm most familiar with DC and NYC lawyers. I'm convinced they're mostly jerks. In NYC, there is an added element of bitterness because they don't make nearly as much money as their clients and feeling like small fish. In DC, there is the added element of being the big fish.
     
  2. GusW

    GusW Well-Known Member

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    I would do it again in a heart beat. I love being around artists, marketing and creative people developing products and putting them out in the world. After being semi-retired for the last 7 years I may do it again. A former competitor wants me to join them. It sounds fun.
     
  3. gladhands

    gladhands Well-Known Member

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    I never actually chose my career. I earned a liberal arts education from an unremarkable institution, and gained no marketable skill. After years of bouncing around aimlessly, I find a low-level job in a very specific, esoteric field. Fast forward to present, I'm an "expert" in that field, that while not particularly lucrative is a "respectable" career with a "respectable" salary.


    Surely I'm not the only one here.
     
  4. ConcernedParent

    ConcernedParent Well-Known Member

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    West Coast is back for all you suckas
    I will be following this thread with great earnestness, because I have no fucking clue what I'm going to do to fuel my expensive tastes and complete lack of work ethic.
     
  5. Mr Herbert

    Mr Herbert Well-Known Member

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    the most difficult thing for me to accept after doing a technical degree and getting quite excited by technical solutions and inovations was working in a field where economics drives reliability far harder than inovation.

    never use anything with less than 10 years proven operation.

    not saying i hate my choice but wish they didnt sell my career the way they do at high school level.

    i also now realise that the only job anyone really respects is a doctor.

    engineers, nerdy. lawyers, bloodsuckers. bankers, boring. doctors, fascinating.
     
  6. Sherlock

    Sherlock Well-Known Member

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    No, I'm a software developer and don't really like it. I like programming, but would prefer to do it on my own time as a hobby rather than for a living. The main reason is poor pay and low job security. There are just too many people in the field which keeps salaries low. Companies deciding to outsource everything to India isn't helping, and that's only getting worse. I also hate many of my coworkers who tend to be mostly very nerdy and socially awkward people. I wish I could go back in time and tell myself to choose a different path. I probably should have gone to medical school and become a surgeon. Awesome money, much more respect, no possibility of being outsourced, and you actually make a difference in peoples' lives.
     
  7. Sherlock

    Sherlock Well-Known Member

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    i also now realise that the only job anyone really respects is a doctor.
    And don't forget firemen. EVERYONE loves firemen. As if what they do is so hard...
     
  8. howardu09

    howardu09 Well-Known Member

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    no. I'd do programming or something similar so I could develop apps and get $$$$$$
     
  9. mkarim

    mkarim Well-Known Member

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    no. I'd do programming or something similar so I could develop apps and get $$$$$$

    Yes. That's where the money is. There is a lot of need for software solutions in every industry. Find a need, a niche and be on your merry way!
     
  10. JustinW

    JustinW Well-Known Member

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    I never actually chose my career. I earned a liberal arts education from an unremarkable institution, and gained no marketable skill. Surely I'm not the only one here.
    You are not. Humanities post-grad degree (econs & history) and military service. I have done everything from combat medic, state needle and syringe programme director, economics & government high-school teacher, labour union researcher, technical and copy writer, brickie's labourer to military advisor/observer to a national liberation army. If I could do it over again I'd choose a nice professional niche like pharmacy, architecture or environmental engineering.
     
  11. Radagast

    Radagast Well-Known Member

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    ..
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2011
  12. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Well-Known Member

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  13. Pilot

    Pilot Well-Known Member

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    This could be an interesting topic if everyone gave at least a hint of what field they actually work in. No one's going to track you down based on your job description you know.

    x2

    I'm currently a flight instructor working my butt off to land my first decent job. The aviation industry is nothing like it used to be. The days of captains making 400k and flying 2-3 times a month is over. Top guys at Fedex and Southwest top out in the 200's, but they're pushing 65 about to retire.

    I could see myself doing a lot of things, but right now the thrill of not knowing where my aviation career could take me is pretty exciting. I refuse to get bogged down by the shitty airline industry like a lot of pilots do. I have no plans to fly for any American airline. Corporate or international cargo/pax is my goal.
     
  14. joei

    joei Well-Known Member

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    Brooklyn
    No. I'm a junior systems admin and I've learned so much over the last 2 years. The pay is decent for my experience and the need for systems admins never goes down. I eventually want to focus solely in unix/linux environments which is the geekiest you can go lol

    I've known I wanted to work with computers since 4th grade and 11 yrs later I still love them.
     
  15. ryoneo

    ryoneo Well-Known Member

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    Yes, I would. I graduated with a teaching degree because I had no idea what I wanted to do. I thought that being an Asian elementary school teacher would give me an advantage of some sort. And trust me, there are not many in Philadelphia.

    After one year of teaching first grade, I decided that it was not for me at that time. I found out that with my degree I could teach internationally. So, I spent the last 15 months teaching English in Korea and it was incredible. I saved up enough money to pay off my loans and travel to 8 different countries. I'm headed back to Korea in mid-October for another year! Yea, I got kind of lucky.
     
  16. shademore

    shademore Well-Known Member

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    Career?

    +1!
     
  17. MasterOfReality

    MasterOfReality Well-Known Member

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    Brisbane, Australia
    Mining/geotechnical engineer.

    I'd do it again.

    Work is varied, interesting and the renumeration excellent.

    I'd encourage my kids to look into it as well.
     
  18. yerfdog

    yerfdog Well-Known Member

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    I'd probably try to be a geologist or something that allowed me to make a good living but also be outdoors, if I could figure out a way to do that in places that aren't West Texas. I have a typical government professional desk job.
     
  19. Flambeur

    Flambeur Well-Known Member

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    I've been more or less having fun trying different things out. Not sure where I will be in 10 years, but I'm much more confident of making the right choices now than before. My issue has always been being passionate about two very distinct paths (almost in terms of basic perception/worldview) and I am still working on bridging those together.

    So ask me again in a while.
     
  20. globetrotter

    globetrotter Well-Known Member

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    greater chicago
    in the weekend FT, there was a quote from Barry Manilow that said "I think that it is great if you can make a living doing what made you most happy at 14". that sounds pretty cool, although I don't know if I could make a living masterbating.
     

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