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Wolverine 721LTD Shell Cordovan 1000 Mile Boot Review

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by Crane's, Oct 21, 2010.

  1. Crane's

    Crane's Well-Known Member

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  2. jcell

    jcell Member

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    [​IMG]
    This is with no pressure on the shoe basically. Its pretty much flush.
    [​IMG]
    This is with some pressure applied to the sole with my thumb.

    Did these pictures show up?
     
  3. jcell

    jcell Member

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    Sorry for multi post, I just posted a reply with pics and it said it had to be reviewed by a mod, so If the pics don't show up please let me know.
     
  4. jcell

    jcell Member

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    I am sure at this point you all think I am a colossal moron, but I have yet another stupid question. Today, while I was on campus it started raining. Because my boot oil has not arrived from Filson yet, Washington State to Georgia, I have not waterproofed my boots, though when I originally got them I did condition with lexol conditioner.

    The water was pretty much sucked into to boots, but my feet did not get wet. So right now they are drying on a shelf with cedar shoe trees inside. I did whip them down with a damp rag.

    Have I done enough to save them or do I need to do more.

    Currently At my house I have;
    1. Lexol Cleaner and Conditioner
    2. Horse hair Brush
    3. Kiwi Camp Dry Mink Oil.
    4. Water
    5. Rags
    6. Optimism

    Is there anything that I need to do that I can do with these items. They are Tan 1000 Mile Addisons.
     
  5. bicktrav

    bicktrav Active Member

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    I have a few pairs of 1000 Mile Boots, including the 721s. This doesn't look egregious. I wouldn't worry. I can do similar things if I start pressing down on the sole of my boots, and I'm not really concerned. If it starts to separate more noticeably without applying pressure to the sole then maybe you should call Wolverine, but I really wouldn't worry at this point.
     
  6. Crane's

    Crane's Well-Known Member

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    Take out the trees and get the boots off the shelf in the closet. You never put wet leather in a dark place without air circulation. That's the fastest way to start a mold farm. The best way to dry them is in the shade outside someplace. Once they are dry wipe them down with boot oil and go about your business. As far as the heel thing is concerned I wouldn't worry about it unless it gets worse.
     
  7. jcell

    jcell Member

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    Cool thanks. I'm not so worried anymore.
    Outside it is raining. I did not properly describe the shelf. It is a NSF restaurant roll cart thing in my living room. Its a vented shelf looking thing. Lots of air flow.

    With regards to the boot oil, should I use the lexol conditioner or the mink oil or neither?
     
  8. Crane's

    Crane's Well-Known Member

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    Lose the mink oil altogether. I use Lexol conditioner when I'm out of boot oil and that doesn't happen very often. I use Lexol cleaner, Filson boot oil and Snoseal almost exclusively on all my leather footwear (and a few other things too). The products I use work and my antics with Wolverine 1K boots for the last 3 years is well documented.
     
  9. bl@ster

    bl@ster Well-Known Member

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    Mink oil is no good?
     
  10. Crane's

    Crane's Well-Known Member

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    The real stuff is animal fat and it can get rancid on you. The other stuff isn't mink oil at all, it's some petroleum based concoction and petroleum anything is bad for leather.
     
  11. jcell

    jcell Member

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    I just read your previous posts a few pages back about mink oil. I had no idea that it did that. I always heard that it softened leather, which is unnecessary for Chromexcel. Does neatsfoot oil have the same bad effect?

    The top part of my boot, just behind the toecap is loosing color. I was reading that Melatonin boot and shoe cream would bring back color to the shoe. Which of the colors would correctly match the tan addison?
     
  12. Crane's

    Crane's Well-Known Member

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    Neatsfoot oil is another product that may or may not be the real thing. I stay away from it as well. Your boots aren't loosing color either. They're lightening up because that's a flex point and is normal. You are spending way too much time worrying about basically nothing. Treat them as I have outlined and you'll have no issues and over time the boots will develop a rich patina. IMO these boots look like shit out of the box when compared to a pair that's a few years old and are well maintained.
     
  13. jcell

    jcell Member

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    You are correct that I am spending way too much time worrying about this. But this being my first pair of nice boots, I can actually do very little about my obsession.


    [​IMG]
    The one on the bottom is perfect. The one on the top has been like that for since day one, and has gotten a little worse over a week. Is it too much to ask to want them to look the same. I have no problem developing patina, but come on.
     
  14. MarioImpemba

    MarioImpemba Well-Known Member

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    Go post in the 1K thread.
     
  15. Crane's

    Crane's Well-Known Member

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    They won't look the same no matter what you do. Each piece of the boot is most likely made from different hides or at best different sections of the same hide. That means each piece/boot will age differently. This is the whole allure of full grain leather. From what I'm seeing the color is through and through just like mine so again that's not the issue. It also looks like the dark area on the top boot is indigo rubbing off on to the leather. You are wearing these with jeans right? It's normal if you are. They also look like they need a good dose of boot oil as well. They look dry and dry leather is very prone to staining. Of course that's something else I don't worry about either. It's all part of the patina process which once again good full grain leather is known for.

    Brand new...

    [​IMG]
    Wolverine Boots Tan Addison 1 by DYSong Photography, on Flickr

    This is nothing compared to some of the crap these boots have seen...

    [​IMG]
    Oh No My Addisons are Ruined! LOL! by DYSong Photography, on Flickr

    No joke, this is how I get the crud off my boots when I'm out hiking. I do it all the time.

    [​IMG]
    Cleaning Your Addisons Trail Style by DYSong Photography, on Flickr

    Just another day of hiking scree looking for artifacts...

    [​IMG]
    Addisons2 by DYSong Photography, on Flickr

    Wiped down with Filson boot oil just because they were dry...

    [​IMG]
    Wolverine Addisons by DYSong Photography, on Flickr

    If I wanted to I could easily clean them up with lexol, treat them with boot oil and snoseal them and they would look awesome. I've done this time and time again with my 721s and original brown 1Ks and have posted plenty of before during and after pics. Just because I can here's an example...

    Trashed after another day of hiking scree covered shorelines and wading knee deep in water...

    [​IMG]
    Original Brown 1K after one day of hiking (2) by DYSong Photography, on Flickr

    Cleaned up and ready for going out. If I really wanted to I could have redressed the sole edge and rubbed out the little scuffs in the toe boxes. Then again I don't worry about things like this.

    [​IMG]
    Final Step B by DYSong Photography, on Flickr

    [​IMG]
    Final Step A by DYSong Photography, on Flickr

    Same goes for the 721s...

    Shell does wear better but the 721s have seen just as much abuse as the other two pairs....

    [​IMG]
    Wolverine Addisons 721LTD Original by DYSong Photography, on Flickr

    Simple maintenance and a lot of water brushing they looked like this. The pics don't do the boots any justice at all. Rich red, black cherry and brown undertones abound. Another example of patina which shell is also known for.

    [​IMG]
    721LTDs Waterbrushed (3) by DYSong Photography, on Flickr

    If this doesn't get you to stop worrying about them nothing will.
     
  16. ElDave

    ElDave Well-Known Member

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    A few thoughts -

    1) Leather will have some imperfections. It's a dead animal's skin, after all. I have some cordovan boots where the horse was obviously scarred. I actually like it.
    2) As Crane's said, that leather looks really dry. If you're an urban hiker and the worse your boots will see is a puddle on the street, then get some polishing cloths (available at any shoe store), some Saphir Renovateur (try Kirby Allison's Hanger Project), and a good brush. Wipe the boots down with a slightly damp rag, brush them, let them dry, apply the Renovateur, brush vigorously.
     
  17. MarioImpemba

    MarioImpemba Well-Known Member

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    Pee on it. The ammonia will bleach the dark spots.
     
  18. izzyfuld

    izzyfuld Well-Known Member

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    sick idea
     
  19. jcell

    jcell Member

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    Yeah, I know. I should just stop worrying about them. I want them to develop a nice patina. Any thing is fixable I guess.
    I may try a colored boot cream first, only because that is what someone else recommended on the shoe care forum. Problem is I wear them in the rain, mud, ect, not just the street. Who knows. We will see how I feel after the Filson boot oil and the sno seal. Funny thing though, you all said it looked dry, and that was after it just had 2 treatments of Conditioner. I used plenty.
     
  20. Crane's

    Crane's Well-Known Member

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    Well your idea of plenty and mine are most likely very different. How did you apply it? Now I'll ask you a few simple questions. Does the guy on the shoe forum own a pair of these boots let alone 3 pairs? If so do they wear them in pastures full of cow shit or walk along a river bank with knee deep black muck? You say you are going to wear them in environments similar to what I wear mine in. Really? Who's advice is worth listening to? You keep worrying about color and want to keep fixing it. It's not broke and around here we don't fix things that aren't broke. Over time these tan boots of yours will darken significantly. If you manage to take care of them the color will eventually become a warm light golden brown in a decade or so. That's what aniline dyed full grain leather does over time. It darkens and there is nothing you can do about it.

    Do what you want, they're your boots. Hopefully you won't hear me tell you I told you so down the road.
     

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