1. Welcome to the new Styleforum!

    We hope you’re as excited as we are to hang out in the new place. There are more new features that we’ll announce in the near future, but for now we hope you’ll enjoy the new site.

    We are currently fine-tuning the forum for your browsing pleasure, so bear with any lingering dust as we work to make Styleforum even more awesome than it was.

    Oh, and don’t forget to head over to the Styleforum Journal, because we’re giving away two pairs of Carmina shoes to celebrate our move!

    Please address any questions about using the new forum to support@styleforum.net

    Cheers,

    The Styleforum Team

    Dismiss Notice

Who was your first client?

Discussion in 'Business, Careers & Education' started by gettoasty, Oct 10, 2012.

  1. mcbrown

    mcbrown Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    727
    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2010
    
    First of all, thank you, that was beautiful and special. Second of all, I understand that it's not literally the exact same situation, but it is more similar than different: low level employee, not the guy I actually have a relationship with, doing the grunt work of having me sign documents, and not a situation where the client (in this case me) wants or needs that low level employee to do anything besides be as efficient as possible.
     
  2. Superfluous

    Superfluous Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,058
    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2010
    Location:
    Dallas
    
    You should treat them with more respect. However, the situation is: Client (human) wants something that requires signatures. OP (also human I think) is required to facilitate them signing it. If they want whatever service they're providing they have to sign it. Regardless, they're both human as far as I know. Unless they start snapping at him or mutter back one-word answers, what's wrong with it?
     
  3. mcbrown

    mcbrown Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    727
    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2010
    Believe me, I am plenty respectful to all IRL... I save my poor attitude for rants on the Internet. :D

    My point isn't that the clients aren't human. It's that rather than deciding on a blanket approach he should follow the clients' lead, and either be chatty or not depending on their signals. But the world won't end if he errs on the chatty side. I guess I'm reading into his post (perhaps incorrectly) that the particular business might warrant a higher level of formality as a default. I could be wrong.
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2012
  4. Superfluous

    Superfluous Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,058
    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2010
    Location:
    Dallas
    I think he should relax about it as it's not a big deal. If he wants to talk to them, he should go ahead and do it. I'm guessing most people will be friendly, and if they aren't he should be able to tell pretty quickly and can then stop talking to that person.
     
  5. mcbrown

    mcbrown Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    727
    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2010
    Fair enough. If they're like me and he overdoes it they may just dutifully indulge him to be polite and then feel annoyed about it afterwards. But the OP sounds respectful and not used-car-salesman-y - he'll probably be fine.
     
  6. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    12,589
    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    Location:
    The American Gardens Building, West 81st
    One word answers are the indicator that you are asking too many questions or you are asking annoying questions. I run into a situation sometimes where I'm the only person in the room with someone else's client. I could ignore them but I like to chat so I will ask them about whatever random thing I think about. I usually avoid a couple things; work related topics being one of them. Most people do not like to talk about what they do and a lot of very wealthy don't want to explain their situation to you, especially if it is not a 9-5 type job.

    I used to shop in a store where every time I went in the guy would practically grill me about my job, i guess to make conversation, but It got pretty annoying pretty quickly.
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2012
  7. Superfluous

    Superfluous Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,058
    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2010
    Location:
    Dallas
    

    For some reason I get asked what I do a lot. It gets old and annoying.
     
  8. Canadian

    Canadian Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    66
    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2007
    I once had a job reviewing documents to be placed on a VIPs desk. We had a code. X was "read", Y was "scan" and Z was "I read it, I'll fill you in if it comes up".

    Ideally Z happens a lot, X minimally and you get the chance to show off what a smart feller you are. And maybe the VIP will ask you to start sitting in on meetings, acting as a personal or administratve assistant. Seriously, one of the VIPs needed a tuxedo jacket before a reception (Blue Jeans and Black Tie) and I was his size, so we took care of things. Even though he wore his own clothes, we picked out a jacket that would work, and get by as a temporary tuxedo (worn with blue jeans and no tie).

    Tom
     
  9. Kai

    Kai Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,189
    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2003
    This is the right answer.
     
  10. globetrotter

    globetrotter Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    20,605
    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2004
    Location:
    greater chicago
    learning to talk to clients is a huge skill, what seperates the men from the boys. one thing that I can say is reading about stuff that interests other people but not you is helpful - over the years I used to read about sports that didn't interest me and about movies and tv that didn't interest me very much, it was a jump start, back when I was in my early 20's.


    good luck
     
    1 person likes this.
  11. CYstyle

    CYstyle Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,219
    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2009
    Learn how to listen. be interested in what they are saying. They are going to lead the conversation you go with it. Think about who you like to talk to and why.
     
  12. Sarah745

    Sarah745 Member

    Messages:
    8
    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2012
    So if you are approached after someone more senior for you personally has remained speaking on their behalf about shit, there's not necessarily any expectation that you just be capable of can be found in and shoot the shit together afterwards. You're just the fundamental level guy transporting it your seniors wouldn't like to do.
     
  13. gettoasty

    gettoasty Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    12,277
    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2010
    Location:
    Home
    So, the main processor in our office who dealt with closing and pushing out paperwork to our vendors once a client commits took a month long vacation that started today.

    It took me almost the entire day to finish 3/4 of an application, 1 for each client. On top of that I am calling up all existing clients for reviews and/or scheduling meetings and getting prospects to commit.

    I cannot believe I have to go through 4 weeks of this and I feel like it is my first day on the job again. Actually, the former is a lot harder. The latter was a breeze and I enjoyed giving people a courtesy call. Paperwork sucks especially when you have incomplete information and a) You ask the CEO who really as no clue and/or thought everything was already delegated b) You blindly fill in the app and hope that nothing is wrong so it does not get bounced back. Both situations suck. I wish people who went on vacation would at least finish their task.

    I stayed in the office an extra 1.5 after everyone had left already. I have 6+ applications that need to be sent out already on top of projects that need my attention.

    Wish me luck.

    /rant
     
  14. stevent

    stevent Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,554
    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2010
    ^^^shitty man, I'm stuck doing some BS work right now myself


    Yeah this helps a ton. Also just go out to a few random gallery openings or charity events and talk to random "intimidating" people. May be awkward but you probably won't see them around again and it's great practice on how to deal with a variety of different people.

    Not doing any business related networking right now so conversations are pretty easy in general, but this still helps.
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2012
  15. landshark

    landshark Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,716
    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2010
    My advice is to lead the conversation with your instructions. Dont talk about weather or other small talk BS. Be all business. If any conversation comes up, be natural but dont force it.

    Always talk to another man eye to eye (or slightly lower- though that's not as necessary if you aren't in sales or negotiations).

    Basically, don't suck up to him or be awkward because he has a lot of money.

    You should see him as an equal or less. He should see you as an equal or higher.

    He's just another man and you need to treat him like one. Stay professional but dont go out of your way to bow down to him or be too formal/polite.
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by