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whnay.'s good taste thread

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Manton, Jul 30, 2012.

  1. GusW

    GusW Well-Known Member

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    One of my all-time favorite ties is a charcoal cashmere knit tie. It only looks right in cool/cold weather but it goes with just about everything and yes, women want to touch it.
     
  2. Claghorn

    Claghorn Well-Known Member

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    I feel that slogan would sell cashmere knits like gangbusters
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. TM79

    TM79 Well-Known Member

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    No doubt. That marketing angle has already worked on things way crappier than cashmere knits.

    See: Axe deoderant
     
  4. GusW

    GusW Well-Known Member

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    [VIDEO][/VIDEO]
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2015
  5. GusW

    GusW Well-Known Member

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    Cashmere, cashmere.....

    [​IMG]
     
  6. GusW

    GusW Well-Known Member

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    Speaking of knit ties.....

    in the early days of A Suitable Wardrobe, Will wrote very positive comments about the crunchy knit Drakes ties. That endorsement seemed to help elevate Drakes knits popularity or at least the awareness of them.

    Am I the only guy who doesn't like Drakes crunchy feel? To me, Charvet knits are the number one choice. I prefer their more silky, less crunchy feel, slightly wider width and most of all the thickness of their weave. Their look and feel is unique among silk knits. I also like their wide range of colors although only a few retailers like Bergdorf offer much of a color selection beyond a few basics.

    If you are considering a classic black or navy silk knit to wear for many years to come, consider a Charvet.
     
  7. dieworkwear

    dieworkwear Well-Known Member

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    You don't have to go to Charvet for that kind of weave. Lands End sells the same thing for like 1/4th of the price.

    IMO, the best thing about Drake's is the shape of the knit, not the actual weave. It's wider than Charvet, but narrows more dramatically at the neck, which allows you to get a small knot.
     
  8. GusW

    GusW Well-Known Member

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    Can't say my last experience with Land's End knits was on the same level as Charvet. But that has been quite a while. I wasn't aware that it changed.

    There are many, less expensive options than Charvet for knits. Paul Stuart is an excellent example. They have solids and dots as well as quite a range of very nice colors. I have several but the Charvets remain as favorite..
     
  9. Monty L

    Monty L Well-Known Member

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    I also tend to prefer Charvet knits over my others (Ede and Ravenscroft, Zegna, Lanvin, BB, Drake's) and they can often be bought at a reasonable discount from Mr. Porter. I would assume with the more recent decline in the euro that the knits are cheaper at Charvet (~€115 on my last visit) than at some high end retailers in the states which often charge nigh on $200.
     
  10. dieworkwear

    dieworkwear Well-Known Member

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    My impression is that knit ties are mostly of the same quality. They just differ on characteristics:

    1. Material: Some of places, such J. Press and Rubinacci, use softer silks. Other places, such as Charvet, Lands End, and Drake's, use crunchier silks. Neither is better or worse; they're just different. Then you have cashmeres and wools, which might get into issues of quality, but those aren't as common as silk.

    2. Weave: Drake's and Conrad Wu are a much tighter weaves than Charvet and Lands End. FWIW, the tight ones seem to come out of Germany and the loose ones out of Italy. I think I know the makers, and I'm pretty sure people are buying from the same factories and just rebranding, but I could be wrong. If it's the factories I'm thinking of, there's no differing quality levels within the same factory -- they just make the things according to your design.

    3. Cut. Drake's is made wide, but tapers quickly at the neck. Lands End, on the other hand, is wide at the body, but doesn't taper as quickly, so you get a thicker knot.

    The width of the body also determines whether you get a tubular or seamed construction. If it's narrow enough, the machine can knit it like a tube. If it's too wide, then you'll have to knit the body flat and then connect the sides in order to make a tube. If the knit has a seam, it's a little thicker, which can affect how the tie knots. Not better or worse not; just different.

    Unlike regular ties, knit ties don't have any real special construction. No interlining, tipping, padding, or special handsewing. It's just a tube of fabric, so the differences are really marginal, and IMO better chalked up characteristics than quality.

    But anyway, this is from a fairly lay point of view. I'm sure there are professionals here who actually make knit ties, and know better than me. The above is just my impression from some brief research years ago.
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2015
    4 people like this.
  11. EliodA

    EliodA Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]

    Too much?
     
    3 people like this.
  12. UrbanComposition

    UrbanComposition Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't call brown stripes on a suit "good taste". YMMV
     
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  13. unbelragazzo

    unbelragazzo Well-Known Member

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    I like the weave and material of the LE knits also, but 1) the one I have is longer than I would like, and 2) I don't like the selection of colors they usually have. Usually just primary colors that I'm not interested in.
     
    1 person likes this.
  14. sugarbutch

    sugarbutch Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, the length seems to be perfect for a tall man wearing hip-huggers who wants the tip of the tie to fall right at his belt buckle.
     
    1 person likes this.
  15. Pliny

    Pliny Well-Known Member

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  16. DocHolliday

    DocHolliday Well-Known Member

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    I'd have agreed with you a few years ago, when knits were somewhat rare specimens, but their boom in popularity has been accompanied by a boom in cheap, poor-quality ones. As you might expect. The are all sorts of thin, flat, limp, dead ones out there now, sometimes with dots that can't wait to come undotted.

    Better brands tend to be better, but I've seen some lackluster ones sneaking into places I wouldn't have expected. Quite easy to spend $70 or more on a knit that isn't worth taking home.
     
  17. dieworkwear

    dieworkwear Well-Known Member

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    Rubinacci used to market their dotted knit ties as having dots sewn-in by hand, rather than machine, and that supposedly made them more durable. That always seemed more like a marketing line to me, but I've also never seen dots come undone.

    Regarding the cheap, flimsy ties, I think I know what you're referring to. The Knottery sells some Chinese knit ties, and they're a bit limp, soft, and thin. I assume someone handling one of those would consider it cheap and poorly made.

    At the same time, a lot of the old school American haberdasheries used to sell the same thing. J. Press, for example, and The Hound in San Francisco. Theirs are made in England, but feel and behave exactly the same. I think they may knitted on the same machines and are made from the same materials. It's just that Chinese factories recently got those machines, so they can produce the same thing for cheaper.

    There are a couple of business school studies about how branding and country-of-origin label affect people's perception of quality. Robert Schooler started much of the field with this study.

    http://www.jstor.org/discover/10.23...&uid=2&uid=3&uid=67&uid=62&sid=21102607569377

    There's also a lit review here

    http://www.brandhorizons.com/papers/Dinnie_COO_litreview.pdf

    I don't know if there are real objective differences between The Knottery type of knits and the made-in-England stuff sold at some American haberdasheries, but if I had to guess, I suspect a lot of our judgements boil down to branding and prejudices about certain countries, rather than anything "objective."

    FWIW, I don't like the thin, soft, flimsy stuff either, but it seems to be well loved in some trad stores.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2015
  18. gdl203

    gdl203 Well-Known Member

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    I didn't know that the over-stitched dots (as we know them on knitted ties) could be machine-sewn. I thought they were pretty much always hand-sewn. All the ones I've seen or considered for the store had hand-sewn dots
     
  19. DocHolliday

    DocHolliday Well-Known Member

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    Conversely, that Trad stores sell something doesn't make it nice. Most of the things in many such stores these days aren't very nice at all.

    I would not have thought a knit could hold permanent wrinkles until I bought one that did. Regardless of whether it's made in England, Italy or China, it's poor.
     
  20. Despos

    Despos Well-Known Member

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    Wore a knit tie made by Gallo the other day and have to say it makes the best knot of the few knits I have from other brands, being Paul Stuart and Venanzi. The Venanzi is a lighter weight and lacks body compared to the Paul Stuart tie

    The Gallo fabric has a unique hand, different than the others. I like Gallo best.
     

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