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Which Interview Outfit Is Better? With PICS

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by plei89, Sep 14, 2011.

  1. pkiula

    pkiula Well-Known Member

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    A lot of good points in this thread already, but I'll throw in my 0.02.

    Questions to keep in mind:

    1. Are you in North America (US, Canada) or in Europe/Asia?
    2. Are you interviewing for a junior starter role or a mid to senior role?
    3. What industry are you interviewing for?

    In general, you won't lose with being simple so err on the side of simplicity. Especially if you are interviewing in North America, for a junior role, and in a conservative industry such as banking.

    That said, if you are interviewing for a mid to senior role, then please dress the part. Know the organization a bit -- if they dress casually, then lose the tie. I absolutely think that French cuffs are okay, even in North America, unless you're interviewing in Ohio or Nebraska. French cuffs are the more formal, more classic cuffs, and anyone who is ignorant on this subject can be quickly corrected (I did this once in a consulting interview in Chicago).

    Suit - please make sure it's well pressed. I keep interview suits a solid color, dark grey or blue. In both your pics, the shoulders are crummy.

    Shirt - I prefer the blue. Is it a non-striped, simpler solid blue? Then it works. No stripes or checks. The collar ideally should be semi widespread and well pressed. French cuffs are fine, especially in Europe/Asia or if you're going for a mid to senior role even in the US.

    Cuff links - those Love Knots you have in the pictured cuffs links are a bit much. Don't you have a simpler square with silver/black lines, or something like that. Inconspicuous is better.

    Shoes/belt/watch - my personal taste is to match all the leather on your body, and ideally the bag too. While I generally prefer a dark brown for daily work, for interview keep the shoe black, polished, and ideally a simple cap toe. Belt should have a simple buckle, not the big badges (I've seen these when interviewing fresh grads), and should not have any creasing in the leather (where the buckle holes are getting frayed or falling apart). I prefer a simple watch with a black leather strap, no steel or other flashy stuff, and usual classic size dial (35 to 40mm), not the wall-clocks that some young men wear these days, and especially not a digital one with plastic straps.

    Tie - I like your red/maroon tie, but I'd lose the tie pin and make sure the knot has a mild dimple. My favorite is half windsor, but four-in-hand would be fine too.

    Above all, clean hair cut, clean shave, wear a mild perfume (don't marinate in something with huge sillage), and be confident. Your manner+mien is the best suit you can wear.

    All the best! :)
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2011
    1 person likes this.
  2. pkiula

    pkiula Well-Known Member

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    True, in general, but depends entirely on the personality. If the man is confident, well skilled, and also well-heeled, it shows me that he has an eye for detail and cares about himself. In my experience, more likely than not, a well dressed man (within reason, with "style" more than dapper "fashion") ends up being good at the job too. Especially in sales or client-facing roles.
     
  3. Jdeansmith11

    Jdeansmith11 Well-Known Member

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  4. laphroaig

    laphroaig Well-Known Member

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    I would just like to say, in Australia a pocket square would stand out, while silver cufflinks and french cuffs would go completely unnoticed.

    What would be considered fashion forward?

    Also, see the ultra conservative business dress thread for advice on ideal interview attire in the US.
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2011
  5. impolyt_one

    impolyt_one Well-Known Member

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    I have a friend who runs one of these programming companies that writes for hedge funds.... and honestly, knowing the guy, he wouldn't even know the difference between your two outfits. That said, you should go with the blue shirt because of the normal cuffs. I'd also try not wear a bright red tie, just my personal preference. Navy would be better. I think the point of the necktie in this case is symbolic rather than anyone caring if it's Borrelli or not. You just need to look like you know what the steps are between rolling out of bed and wiping your ass in the morning to showing up on or before time for work, and look like you're gonna do work without giving them problems.
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2011
  6. MikeDT

    MikeDT Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]
    Are software companies employing cartoon monkeys these days?.... must be Microsoft.

    BTW I think your trousers might need pressing.
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2011
  7. dks202

    dks202 Well-Known Member

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    Everything needs a good pressing, especially the pants. I don't see any crease.. and to me, the jacket is too tight... it pulls too much and shows some shirt.




    :)
     
  8. SlightRight

    SlightRight Member

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    Bravo!!! I guess I just can't agree more.
    I have a solid navy suits. Can it be matched with dark burgundy dress shoes? Like Alden color 8.
    I'm fresh graduates up to first interview like u mentioned, lol.
    thx
     
  9. kasakka

    kasakka Well-Known Member

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    Maybe it's because I work in the creative industry but the concept of an interview suit is pretty foreign to me. We hire people primarily based on skills and personality. As long as they come to interview in a somewhat presentable condition it's all good. It doesn't matter what kind of shoes they wear or if they are in a suit or not.
     
  10. RSS

    RSS Well-Known Member

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    In my office* ... no coat ... no job.

    * I'm now retired ... but the continuing partners have the same practice.
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2011
  11. rohde88

    rohde88 Well-Known Member

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    Wear a watch, its much easier to check the time before the interview.
     
  12. Testudo_Aubreii

    Testudo_Aubreii Well-Known Member

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    I think we see a difference of interview philosophies between those who think the hank, links, and bar are fine and those who think they'll hurt. Those who say they're fine take the view that when being the applicant in a dark-suited job interview, one should strive to present a sober and professional suited image. Period. Those who say they'll hurt instead think that one should strive to present what any probable interviewer will accept as a sober and professional suited image. They also think that in order to achieve that, you have to dress in the way the interviewer has most frequently seen dark-suited men of the appropriate social status dress in for professional situations. I.e., you have to aim for the modal dark-suited professional ensemble that your interviewers have seen on people in the rough social status from which most of the competitive candidates for the job are pulled.

    Which philosophy is true? I don't know. Which philosophy is better to adopt? For me, the first, because the second requires too much work. The details of ten-year fashions in dress don't interest me much: and if you adopt the second philosophy, you have to devote serious thought to those details. But if you do like following fashion--i.e., real fashion, trends in what's modally worn in social strata in the past ten years or so--then it's probably not a cost to you at all.

    (I chose 10-year fashions because those are the ones most likely to have shaped the outlook of all probable interviewers.)
     
  13. pkiula

    pkiula Well-Known Member

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    Navy blue goes very well with burgundy, but not for an interview! Stick to black. Aldens are nice and inconspicuous in black captoe, which is what you want.
     
  14. musicguy

    musicguy Well-Known Member

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    I don't think it's too small, maybe very slightly. What you've noticed are open quarters, showing shirt below the buttoning. If anything, it's just too short and the button stance is too high.
     
  15. MrDaniels

    MrDaniels Well-Known Member

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    I could not agree more. French cuffs are totally mainstream at this point...unless your outfit is starting to border on Gordon Gekko I can't imagine being downgraded for them.

    I think a straight-fold white PS can work and give you an edge looking like someone who takes time and cares. I think a silk or any sort of elaborate or poufy PS is probably a bad idea, unless you are interviewing for a creative field or a flashy sales job.
     
  16. Leonel Dante

    Leonel Dante Well-Known Member

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    True, the fit is far from perfect. But if you are going with this suit, I think you should get rid of the tie clip. Cufflinks and pocket square are ok, but no pocket square and single cuffs is simpler and correct for an interview too.
     
  17. impolyt_one

    impolyt_one Well-Known Member

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    French cuffs are mainstream, but the mainstream dresses pretty badly.

    Honestly, french cuffs look pretty high faluting. There are formal clothes, and there are white collar work clothes, neither are the other. People who wear French cuffs and true formalwear for work are more likely to be serving you dinner.
     
  18. pkiula

    pkiula Well-Known Member

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    You do realize that's a very North American point of view.
     
  19. impolyt_one

    impolyt_one Well-Known Member

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    How so? French cuffs are also unacceptable for work dress in Asia, and parts of Europe as well. Beyond that, I think no junior level employee should really be wearing French cuffs or colored shirts.
     
  20. uniesse

    uniesse Well-Known Member

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    Why on earth not?
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2011

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