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What martial art should I learn?

Discussion in 'Health & Body' started by TheIdler, Oct 17, 2007.

  1. Rambo

    Rambo Well-Known Member

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    I'M IN MIAMI, BITCH
    check out the clips here: http://www.history.com/minisites/humanweapon Never seen the show myself just stuff off the website.
    It's a good show if you're interested in learning the history and seeing some moves in action. The two guys are really annoying and they spend a lot of time with exposition and shit. The best parts are the discovery channel style graphics which show two dummies moving in the style of the attack. I've picked up a few tips myself. I'll second Globe's recommendation of Krav. I find it's the most useful in everyday type situations. I wouldn't want to fuck around on the mat with somebody who knows BJJ but If you're in down on the ground with the guy from the bar, it does you no good when his buddies show up and start kicking you in the head and ribs. I witnessed this recently and it was NOT pretty.
     
  2. NorCal

    NorCal Well-Known Member

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    I have a friend who was very very serious with akido - went a half dozen times to Japan for 2 months to study, studied for years 4-5 times a week. once I saw him stand up to some guy who called him "gay" and get the crap beaten out of him, and once he asked me to try to puch him, basically he wanted to show me that I could try to push him with all my strength and he wouldn't budge - I gave him a shove and he flew about 10 feet back. I get teh feeling that arts like aikido give a lot of false confidence to people.

    Totally true, Aikido is basically a cooperative art, and does not really train for "real" life combat situations. When I did train I always had the thought in the back of my head"yes but could you still throw me if I was punching you in the face". However it does train for a lot of non combative 'real" life situations. Again, at the risk of totally sounding like a dirt worshiping hippie, training for coperative action is not the worst thing in the world. There is also a very deep and real ki based medatative tradition behind it that those so inclined might find really valuable. I never pursued it to any great depth but I definitely found my self respecting it as an art.
     
  3. Eason

    Eason Well-Known Member

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    check out the clips here:

    http://www.history.com/minisites/humanweapon

    Never seen the show myself just stuff off the website.



    It's a great show, some BS moments in every episode, but for the most part it's legit.

    I've yet to see any Aikido that I would call useful in a self defense situation. I've seen some stuff that looked alright, but it was basically not nearly as good if somebody just learned some boxing and judo and wrestling instead.
    I've done Muay Thai for about 5 years, Brazilian Jiujitsu/Submission Wrestling about 1 year, and taekwondo for about 2 years. I like Jiujitsu, I'll probably do it when I get older and I can't keep doing the impact of Muay Thai, but I freaking LOVE muay thai and it suits me completely. Find something that fits you best and stick with it.

    random addition: General rule of thumb for martial arts is that it is a contact sport and they should make you sore the next day, so if you aren't pushing your physical limits then you probably aren't learning anything worth learning.
     
  4. Gradstudent78

    Gradstudent78 Well-Known Member

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    random addition: General rule of thumb for martial arts is that it is a contact sport and they should make you sore the next day, so if you aren't pushing your physical limits then you probably aren't learning anything worth learning.

    That is going to depend on why your learning it and what you consider useful. In terms of self defense some of the most useful things to learn are about being aware of your surroundings and not looking like a victim. Both of which can be learned without breaking a sweat or being sore the next day and yet they are highly worth learning if your interested in self defense aspects.
     
  5. Eason

    Eason Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, but you don't need to spend 50-150$ a month to learn that, you've just saved him money.
     
  6. cldpsu

    cldpsu Well-Known Member

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    I'm kidding man. I'm poking fun at girly Europeans. El Correr means "Running". Actually the French have a style of kickboxing called Savate, but they look really gay doing it.

    Is this Van Damme's work? [​IMG]
     
  7. Gradstudent78

    Gradstudent78 Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, but you don't need to spend 50-150$ a month to learn that, you've just saved him money.

    Not really, I told him some important things that he needed to know but not how to do them.
    However, anyone interested in self defense can learn a large portion of what will be helpful in terms of the non-physical elements as well as some of the physical elements in a good self defense course, in much less then a month.
     
  8. adversity04

    adversity04 Well-Known Member

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    For self defense I would go with either Krav maga or Muay Thai. I do Krav myself, but would do Muay if I didn't. If you're looking for something on a spiritual level I would say to not look at either of these as they're about beating the snot out of your opponent [​IMG] Go with Karate, Aikido, etc if you want a mental exercise.
     
  9. Miguel Antonio

    Miguel Antonio Well-Known Member

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    I recommend fencing, archery and some firearms training.
     
  10. Rolo

    Rolo Well-Known Member

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    I vote for Kendo. You get to hit people with sticks.
     
  11. mizanation

    mizanation Well-Known Member

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    It seems to me that a lot of martial arts training lends itself to developing the mind as well as the body in a way that's different from, say, playing squash. Plus, just about everything I've read so far about martial arts seems to say the same thing. But your phrasing indicates you think otherwise?

    Well, as I said, I'm also interested in the mental/meditation aspects, and the Chinese/Japanese traditions seem more in line with this than, say, Krav Maga. It's also, at least where I'm living now, easier to find schools that teach these.


    i'm kinda confused what this thread is about. seems like you have already decided what you want. besides that, you have limited choices--luckily the choices you do have coincide with your current notion of what martial arts do and are.

    so unfortunately, no one on here is going to be able to give you any advice, unless you are just looking for moral support.
     
  12. adversity04

    adversity04 Well-Known Member

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    On 2nd thought, he should probably just do yoga if all he wants is meditation and spiritual building [​IMG]
     
  13. mizanation

    mizanation Well-Known Member

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    On 2nd thought, he should probably just do yoga if all he wants is meditation and spiritual building [​IMG]

    yoga is a great option.

    i think it provides better self-defense than many martial arts in that it gives you a peaceful state of mind and lessens stress.

    you'll meet a lot of hot girls at the class, so you won't need to go to bars and get into altercations.

    plus, it will give you better strength and conditioning than most martial arts schools provide.
     
  14. TheIdler

    TheIdler Well-Known Member

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    i'm kinda confused what this thread is about. seems like you have already decided what you want. besides that, you have limited choices--luckily the choices you do have coincide with your current notion of what martial arts do and are.

    so unfortunately, no one on here is going to be able to give you any advice, unless you are just looking for moral support.


    Dude, what's up? Everybody else is being really helpful, but you seem a bit critical of...what exactly? I haven't made up my mind yet...why would I be asking if I had? Seriously, if you think I'm going about this wrong or I have the wrong idea about something, I'm open to hearing what you think. But your kind of veiled comments aren't really helping.

    Anyway, thanks to everybody else who has chimed in. You guys have convinced me that Muay Thai might be useful, and Aikido is a possibility. I'm definitely going to go to a couple of judo and karate schools and check them out. What should I be looking for in a teacher/school? I mean, I realize I should be wary of schools that promise a guaranteed black belt in X months, but are there any other positive/negative things I should look out for?
     
  15. retronotmetro

    retronotmetro Well-Known Member

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    Low risk of injury, competitive sport, and practical self defense are not really going to be found under one roof. You're going to have to figure out what aspect you want to give up or de-emphasize.

    If you really want to stick with East Asian styles, your closest fit will probably be karate or judo. Go with judo if throws and grappling appeal to you, go with karate if you want to work on punching and kicking.

    There are varying degrees of contact in karate styles. Kyokushin karate and its offshoots (Oyama, Ashihara, and Enshin among others) typically use a full contact (no strikes to the groin or joints, kicks but no punches to the head) method with little protective gear. This makes their style of training a better one for self defense, but it has higher risk of injury for obvious reasons. Just about every other karate style will be somewhere on the range from zero contact to medium contact, which lowers the injury risk but also lowers the real fighting skills developed because people don't learn to take a punch and sometimes have problems with learning how to really parry or avoid full strength techniques.

    My guess is that in Spain you should be able to easily find a group that trains in shotokan style karate. Depending in lineage, most shotokan groups tend to teach a very sport-oriented noncontact style. You might want to start there.
     
  16. gdl203

    gdl203 Well-Known Member

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  17. LabelKing

    LabelKing Well-Known Member

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    I think this is highly appropriate:

    [​IMG]
     
  18. Gradstudent78

    Gradstudent78 Well-Known Member

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    Dude, what's up? Everybody else is being really helpful, but you seem a bit critical of...what exactly? I haven't made up my mind yet...why would I be asking if I had? Seriously, if you think I'm going about this wrong or I have the wrong idea about something, I'm open to hearing what you think. But your kind of veiled comments aren't really helping.

    Anyway, thanks to everybody else who has chimed in. You guys have convinced me that Muay Thai might be useful, and Aikido is a possibility. I'm definitely going to go to a couple of judo and karate schools and check them out. What should I be looking for in a teacher/school? I mean, I realize I should be wary of schools that promise a guaranteed black belt in X months, but are there any other positive/negative things I should look out for?


    Avoid any place that wont let you watch a class or seems too secretive. Avoid any place that promises superhuman skills (i.e. the ability to throw or attack people without touching them). I'd generally stay away from places with long term contracts. Take a look at how big the class sizes are and who's teaching the classes. Ask plenty of questions about what they offer and explain what you want. Make sure you go to a bunch of places before deciding on one, don't just go with the first one that looks good.

    Ask if your required to compete or test for belts/rank (as well as how much this may cost), and buy a uniform. You should find out the variety or range of classes offered and types of training (including weapons), level of etiquette, general focus of training (self defense, competition, health, spiritual development, etc) and instructors background. None of these things are inherently good or bad, but you have to decide what appeals to you, what you individually want and don't want.
     
  19. Eason

    Eason Well-Known Member

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    I vote for Kendo. You get to hit people with sticks.

    If you really want to hit people with sticks, go with Kali or escrima.
     
  20. mizanation

    mizanation Well-Known Member

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    not trying to be critical, just trying to help you out. you have this notion that you can develop mental discipline and, i think, some kind of spirituality through martial arts--specifically some sort of "east asian" traditional martial art. which can be true. but, you have to understand that this has nothing to do with performance in terms of fighting or "self-defense"--which is the purpose of martial art. there is no level of spiritual understanding which will make you a better fighter. realistic training in a proven system of fighting will make you a better fighter. the cool thing, though, is that you can develop the "mental discipline" that you desire, through this training. even though it's not as exotic as you would hope. so, you have to decide whether you want to learn a spiritual discipline or a martial art.
     

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