1. Welcome to the new Styleforum!

    We hope you’re as excited as we are to hang out in the new place. There are more new features that we’ll announce in the near future, but for now we hope you’ll enjoy the new site.

    We are currently fine-tuning the forum for your browsing pleasure, so bear with any lingering dust as we work to make Styleforum even more awesome than it was.

    Oh, and don’t forget to head over to the Styleforum Journal, because we’re giving away two pairs of Carmina shoes to celebrate our move!

    Please address any questions about using the new forum to support@styleforum.net

    Cheers,

    The Styleforum Team

    Dismiss Notice

What makes a good LinkedIn profile?

Discussion in 'Business, Careers & Education' started by crazyquik, Mar 19, 2011.

  1. Stu

    Stu Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,351
    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2002
    Location:
    Princeton
    Here is my summary:



    Too cheesy? Too much? Critique me please.


    For me it's way too long. We live in an age of bullet points. And the Blue Oceans thing was a bit over the top. But then again, I am a professional editor, so I am always looking to make things shorter. So I am probably not your target.
     
  2. Artisan Fan

    Artisan Fan Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    32,345
    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2006
    Stu is right, the original text was far too long. Recruiters and managers simply don't have the time.
     
  3. crazyquik

    crazyquik Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,082
    Joined:
    May 8, 2007
    Location:
    Capital of Southern Elitism
    *Has anyone ever been contacted by a legit recruiter via LinkedIn?

    My "scholarly" (HA!) work has been published and as a result other firms in my field have cold-called me about it. Not a recruiter, but interesting to me.
     
  4. highball

    highball Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    283
    Joined:
    May 18, 2008
    Location:
    NYC
    Here's an odd question. Has anyone been recommended on LinkedIn by someone they have not done business with and don't have much of a relationship with? A while back I accepted a LI connection from a guy whom I have met a few times at industry events but don't know very well. He then proceeded to write a recommendation along the lines that he has known me for a long time, I always provided quality deliverables, and he will continue to do business with me. However, it's a complete lie, I have never worked with him and don't have any reason to in the foreseeable future.

    I have hidden the recommendation from my profile but am wondering if there's a way to delete it entirely. Has this happened to anyone else?
     
  5. Artisan Fan

    Artisan Fan Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    32,345
    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2006
    ^That's an odd one. Too much risk in keeping it around but I am not sure how you would delete one. I think it is pretty easy though.

    I have heard from some search guys that having at least a few recommendations is required from a credibility standpoint. Most people are happy to oblige.
     
  6. highball

    highball Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    283
    Joined:
    May 18, 2008
    Location:
    NYC
    I've looked through all of the controls within LinkedIn and there doesn't seem to be an option to outright delete it from my end, only hide it from public view. I have considered emailing the guy and asking him to remove it, but since he obviously is not very professional I'm not sure I want to risk dealing with him. Perhaps I will email the LinkedIn help desk to see if they can remove it.

    Currently working on getting rec's from a former boss and clients and perhaps a peer/colleague at my current firm. Any thoughts on other avenues for gaining recommendations for someone who is younger and has not worked on too many projects/clients thus far?
     
  7. Artisan Fan

    Artisan Fan Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    32,345
    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2006
    Best to request recommendations at the end of a project when you have done solid work.
     
  8. KPO89

    KPO89 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    964
    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2009
    Location:
    The SunnierSide of Queens
    Thanks for the help guys
     
  9. medtech_expat

    medtech_expat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,019
    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2006
    Location:
    Paris & SF
    *Has anyone ever been contacted by a legit recruiter via LinkedIn?

    Yes, almost weekly. For the most part, these are boutique or local/regional recruiters, but provided they are retained firms I'll explore options. To get on the board with a global player (e.g. Heidrick & Struggles, Russell Reynolds, etc.), it's best to be introduced from someone already within their network.
     
  10. medtech_expat

    medtech_expat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,019
    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2006
    Location:
    Paris & SF
    Just for shits & giggles, here's my summary:

    13 years delivering exceptional results in technology & healthcare across four continents. Developed advanced capabilities in general management, sales & marketing strategy, product development, product marketing and market development in entrepreneurial and Fortune 500 environments. Successfully created and managed new revenue opportunities, recruited and developed international, multi-functional teams, raised equity financing, and collaborated with KOLs in electrophysiology, cardiology & advanced wound healing.

    Rip 'er up, boys! [​IMG]
     
  11. unjung

    unjung Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,544
    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2008
    Location:
    The beach
  12. Connemara

    Connemara Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    39,486
    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2006
    I just cannot stand all of the industry mumbo jumbo.
     
  13. unjung

    unjung Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,544
    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2008
    Location:
    The beach
    I just cannot stand all of the industry mumbo jumbo.

    On a somewhat related note, are you working these days?
     
  14. Duff_Man

    Duff_Man Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    709
    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2009
    Location:
    Toronto, CA
    LinkedIn is a bit grey for me.

    In an industry where social media is seen as a PERSEC risk, what is the balance between presence and oversharing?
     
  15. yeungjai

    yeungjai Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    121
    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2010
    LinkedIn is a bit grey for me.

    In an industry where social media is seen as a PERSEC risk, what is the balance between presence and oversharing?


    I would say that to make it easier on recruiters and hiring managers, don't disclose anything on your LI profile that you wouldn't disclose on your resume. Examples include:

    Your photo (arguably)
    Your marital status or family status
    Disability status
    Religion

    And any other prohibited grounds for discrimination, wherever you are.

    I am not saying this to say that you will be discriminated against and that you should guard against it, but from the employer's point of view, this is all unnecessary information. An employer has nothing to gain by being privy to this sort of information, but seeing it opens the doors to potential legal liabilities. For example, if a candidate is found off LI, moves through the recruitment process, and is not the one selected to be hired, they can allege that they were discriminated against based on something on their profile - it's one of the big reasons why people in the industry do not recruit off of facebook or more casual social networking sites. They don't want to be charged on discriminating against anyone on anything outside of the requirements of the position.
     
  16. Connemara

    Connemara Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    39,486
    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2006
    On a somewhat related note, are you working these days?
    Yessir!
     
  17. Stazy

    Stazy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,194
    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2006
    Location:
    Toronto
    Too cheesy? Too much? Critique me please.

    Trying to be constructive here. I have worked in marketing for a long time and my suggestion would be to put paragraph 3 first and start with "I create need". Otherwise you are hoping the reader makes it through two paragraphs before getting to your value statement - which is a good one. So put your hard hitting value statement first and then back it up (work or projects that you have done, skills, etc).

    I have a comment regarding the statement that "you create need". I think this is a common misconception amongst marketers. Marketers do not create need. Rather, the goal of marketing is to communicate how a product/service meets a need. For example, the need for entertainment. Marketers didn't create this need. It exists outside of marketing. Where marketing plays a role is communicating how a product meets one's entertainment needs.

    I would update your paragraph to say something like this: "I can strongly communicate how a product/service meets the needs of consumers".
     
  18. Duff_Man

    Duff_Man Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    709
    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2009
    Location:
    Toronto, CA
    I would say that to make it easier on recruiters and hiring managers, don't disclose anything on your LI profile that you wouldn't disclose on your resume. Examples include:

    Your photo (arguably)
    Your marital status or family status
    Disability status
    Religion

    And any other prohibited grounds for discrimination, wherever you are.

    I am not saying this to say that you will be discriminated against and that you should guard against it, but from the employer's point of view, this is all unnecessary information. An employer has nothing to gain by being privy to this sort of information, but seeing it opens the doors to potential legal liabilities. For example, if a candidate is found off LI, moves through the recruitment process, and is not the one selected to be hired, they can allege that they were discriminated against based on something on their profile - it's one of the big reasons why people in the industry do not recruit off of facebook or more casual social networking sites. They don't want to be charged on discriminating against anyone on anything outside of the requirements of the position.


    That's not exactly what I mean. For instance, I don't disclose on my LI profile my MA concentration, because it is specific enough that it could potentially compromise me and hinder my prospects for employment in a field that heavily emphasizes discretion.
     
  19. Willie5566

    Willie5566 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    647
    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2009
    LinkedIn is a bit grey for me.

    In an industry where social media is seen as a PERSEC risk, what is the balance between presence and oversharing?


    Get on board. It will not be long before your "brand" is the only thing that will get you a job. Linked In is a great professional site. In addition to having a profile that can land you jobs, there are also discussion groups where some great ideas are being exchanged.
     
  20. qma

    qma Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    114
    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2010
    Location:
    Oslo
    I have a comment regarding the statement that "you create need". I think this is a common misconception amongst marketers. Marketers do not create need. Rather, the goal of marketing is to communicate how a product/service meets a need. For example, the need for entertainment. Marketers didn't create this need. It exists outside of marketing. Where marketing plays a role is communicating how a product meets one's entertainment needs.

    I would update your paragraph to say something like this: "I can strongly communicate how a product/service meets the needs of consumers".


    +1. A paraphrase would be a quote by Drucker, which I think sounds better:

    "The aim of marketing is to know and understand the customer so well the product or service fits him and sells itself."


    I think it could be a good idea to take this perspective and highlight that you understand that what makes good marketing is the ability to truly understand the customer and her needs - both those they are aware of and those they are not ("If I had listened to my customers I would have invented a faster horse" - Ford).
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by