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What did you eat last night for dinner?

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by Fabienne, Jan 31, 2005.

  1. edmorel

    edmorel Well-Known Member

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    I think, like everything else, it comes down to each person's view of the incremental benefit/diminishing return of doing something and in this case, how deep down the rabbit hole you want to go in terms of cooking techniques/appliances etc. I am using a cast iron pant and butter, Pio sous vide and herbs/spices, mgm sodium alginate/agar agar, hairymatt pigs blood/siphons/tweezers
     
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  2. Piobaire

    Piobaire Well-Known Member

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    I think it's better to have a variety of ways to do things. In the last year I've grilled steaks, done the pan/butter way, and sous vide/sear method. All have produced good results, and depending on circumstances, I decided which way was fitting for the given day.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2017
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  3. mafoofan

    mafoofan Well-Known Member

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    Conflating a few things here. There are two different issues: (1) does sous vide allow for a better steak, and (2) for same results, is sous vide easier than cooking steak the traditional ways?

    We can debate the first issue. For example, some people like a gradient doneness--there is nothing right or wrong about it. In that case, traditional methods are the only way to go. But for consistent doneness throughout, you need sous vide.

    However, when it comes to ease of prep, it's pretty straightforward. Active time doing steak sous vide is same or less.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2017
  4. edmorel

    edmorel Well-Known Member

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    you still use a roasting/searing pan at the end, or a blowtorch. And whether they are cheap or not, vacumm sealers and immersion circulators are more equipment to buy/have on your countertop. And yes, when using a pan, you are there for the whole time (although not really), but that time amounts to 15-20 minutes prep/cook and you are eating. One pan to clean. Use whatever method you like but cooking a steak in a pan is one of the easiest and quickest methods imaginable. In the time it will take you to reply to this post, I could probably season and cook a steak, have it ready to eat.
     
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  5. Piobaire

    Piobaire Well-Known Member

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    I don't think anyone is arguing over cooking time so we can safely set that aside and say the sous vide method, from start to finish, is far longer.

    Indeed a vacuum sealer and immersion circulator are additional pieces of equipment however I could make the argument combined they take far less space and are multitudes less expensive than your cooktop. As I could sear the steak in a $50 countertop induction burner my point there would be just as "valid." I placed that in quotations as I don't find this whole line of argumentation very productive. First, both the sealer and sous vide can do so much more than steaks (as can the range cooktop), the really don't take much room (particularly compared to that cooktop) and fit quite easily in a cupboard. I think the equipment argument is going to end up being a not very strong argument, Ed.

    Oh, and as to cleaning, you're going to have to clean that cooktop after the pan method unless you have some magical kitchen.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2017
  6. edmorel

    edmorel Well-Known Member

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    the one thing that sous vide really intrigues me about would be a bbq/smoke cook. Instead of 10-12 hours of smoke for a brisket, an overnight bath and then out to the smoker for an hour or two? Also ribs, wonder if you could get a good consistency texture by using an immersion circulator and then throwing them on the wood for an hour or so.
     
  7. Piobaire

    Piobaire Well-Known Member

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    I'd not sous vide a packer's cut brisket as I think the rendering of the fat in the slow some would impart a different character. In a sous vide you'd basically end up doing brisket confit as the fat rendered in the cooking bag. Desirable in duck legs but I'm not so sure desirable in ribs or brisket.
     
  8. mafoofan

    mafoofan Well-Known Member

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    Cooking a steak in a pan also leads to the least consistent results.


    Dude--roma and others specifically questioned timing and ease-of-prep. In fact, you responded that there is less active time with sous vide, which I directly agreed with. As for cleaning, I was specific that you don't have to clean a roast pan, which you would need to do a roast/sear. In any case, there is a skillet involved.

    Wtf are you arguing?


    Have you not cooked sous vide? Think you might be projecting more difficulty/complexity than is actually the case.

    And like I said, if one is regularly eating Prime grade steaks at home, the small expense and size of a circulator shouldn't really be an issue.
     
  9. otc

    otc Well-Known Member

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    One of the big reasons I was interested the sous vide equipment was life in an apartment with no vent hood and an open layout.

    Searing a steak still throws a fair amount of shit in the air, but less than if I was cooking the whole thing that way. And for things where I use the torch to give it some color (like chicken going into pasta), there's a significant decrease in the amount of smoke/oil film/odor that fills my apartment.
     
  10. Piobaire

    Piobaire Well-Known Member

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    At least in part more than one statement equivalent of:

    The long cook time continues to be tossed out and no one in favour of sous vide is denying it so we can stop talking about it.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2017
  11. mafoofan

    mafoofan Well-Known Member

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    Active prep time and cooking time are two different things. It sounds like multiple people in this thread don't have any experience with sous vide and may not understand how it works in practice--hence the ensuing discussion. What people already "in favour of sous vide" think is neither here nor there.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2017
  12. Piobaire

    Piobaire Well-Known Member

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    Yes, I know and have made this distinction, and thought it evident the rest of what you just said is apparent too. WTF are you posting about?
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2017
  13. mafoofan

    mafoofan Well-Known Member

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    Wasting my time responding to a nutjob, apparently . . .
     
  14. Piobaire

    Piobaire Well-Known Member

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    Again, something that's not under contention.
     
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  15. brokencycle

    brokencycle Well-Known Member

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    Again, here's where we will disagree. I have used the reverse sear method numerous times. Without fail I have been able to do a medium rare throughout with an insignificant temperature gradient.
     
  16. coolpapa

    coolpapa Well-Known Member

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    i have done this with brisket and it was fantastic. I rubbed a brisket with the usual rub, dropped it in the sous vide supreme for about 36 hours, then smoked it on the pit for a few hours. It was juicy, tender, and had great flavor. I liked it so much I felt bad for all the people that spend years perfecting their brisket techniques that can last for days and require a lot more attention.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2017
  17. Piobaire

    Piobaire Well-Known Member

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    Flat or Packer's? Also, thanks for the report as I'd never have tried it.
     
  18. romafan

    romafan Well-Known Member

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    So say you want to eat @ 7 o'clock.

    Do you need to work backward for the timing (20 mins prep & pre-sear; 3 hrs bath-time; 10 mins post-ear + plate = 3:30 start), or is SV method more forgiving (say I'm doing stuff in the middle of the afternoon but can start prep @ 2 - that means there is an hour and a half 'downtime' between end of bath and when I go in to post-sear/plate mode)?
     
  19. venividivicibj

    venividivicibj Well-Known Member

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    I've done ribs in the SV. SV for first few hours, and then finish on grill. Texture/charring was normal. (I dont have a smoker so can't help on that front)
     
  20. venividivicibj

    venividivicibj Well-Known Member

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    Here you go-

    "
    One advantage of sous vide cooking is that you can have the food pre-cooked and frozen in sealed pouches in the freezer, ready to be reheated and served when necessary. As long as you reheat it below the target cooking temperature, your food will be perfectly cooked.
    "
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2017

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