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What are you reading?

Discussion in 'Entertainment, Culture, and Sports' started by chorse123, Mar 13, 2006.

  1. indesertum

    indesertum Well-Known Member

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    I'm reading walden and actually kinda enjoying it besides the cliched trite quality of it
     
    1 person likes this.
  2. VaderDave

    VaderDave Well-Known Member

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    That's one of those books that struggles under the weight of too many breathless quotes from hippie-dippie weirdos over the years. If you just read it without thinking "this is a major manifesto for living a beautiful life!" then it's really quite charming, IMHO.
     
  3. VaderDave

    VaderDave Well-Known Member

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    I'm kind of thinking about going on a Shakespeare binge for a couple of weeks. We have at least a dozen of his works on our shelves. That seems like a worthwhile pursuit. I haven't read any Shakespeare in a long time.
     
  4. lawyerdad

    lawyerdad Well-Known Member

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    Seconded.
     
  5. lawyerdad

    lawyerdad Well-Known Member

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    The ant war is totally bad-ass.
     
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  6. VaderDave

    VaderDave Well-Known Member

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    I started reading King Lear this weekend. I'm enjoying it so far. I'm going to take it slowly so I can enjoy the language and read all the little notes as I go.
     
    1 person likes this.
  7. marvin100

    marvin100 Well-Known Member

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    Lear owns. My favorite of the tragedies,
     
    1 person likes this.
  8. why

    why Well-Known Member

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    Ripeness is all.

    Possibly best-written scene in any English play.
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2016
    1 person likes this.
  9. noob in 89

    noob in 89 Well-Known Member

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    I heard that outside the occasional pond excursion, Thoreau's life was actually a lot like Jeff Who Lives At Home.
     
  10. erictheobscure

    erictheobscure Well-Known Member

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    If you're enjoying it in that particular way (in slow, readerly fashion, pausing to appreciate the language), you might want to check out Stephen Booth's essay/chapter "On the Greatness of Lear," in his book _King Lear, Macbeth, Indefinition & Tragedy_. Really great essay--but one that only really works if we primarily think of Lear as a text to be read rather than a play to be performed.
     
    1 person likes this.
  11. VaderDave

    VaderDave Well-Known Member

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    Thanks! I will check it out.

    I have read Lear several times before (like pretty much all of Shakespeare's major works) but it has been a few years since I've revisited any of them. I tend to read the plays and see little movies of the action in my head, but sometimes I just get caught up in the language and forget about that part. Either way: good times. :D
     
  12. lawyerdad

    lawyerdad Well-Known Member

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    Booth is (or at least was back when I was at Berkeley) a likeable, enthusiastic nutjob. And if that ^ is how you think of Lear you're doing it wrong.

    While "ripeness is everything" is a fine passage, because I'm a mean-spirited, judgmental a-hole the bit that truly brings joy to my heart is:

    KENT

    Fellow, I know thee.

    OSWALD

    What dost thou know me for?

    KENT

    A knave; a rascal; an eater of broken meats; a
    base, proud, shallow, beggarly, three-suited,
    hundred-pound, filthy, worsted-stocking knave; a
    lily-livered, action-taking knave, a whoreson,
    glass-gazing, super-serviceable finical rogue;
    one-trunk-inheriting slave; one that wouldst be a
    bawd, in way of good service, and art nothing but
    the composition of a knave, beggar, coward, pandar,
    and the son and heir of a mongrel bitch: one whom I
    will beat into clamorous whining, if thou deniest
    the least syllable of thy addition.

    OSWALD

    Why, what a monstrous fellow art thou, thus to rail
    on one that is neither known of thee nor knows thee!

    KENT

    What a brazen-faced varlet art thou, to deny thou
    knowest me! Is it two days ago since I tripped up
    thy heels, and beat thee before the king? Draw, you
    rogue: for, though it be night, yet the moon
    shines; I'll make a sop o' the moonshine of you:
    draw, you whoreson cullionly barber-monger, draw.
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2016
    6 people like this.
  13. The Ernesto

    The Ernesto Well-Known Member

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    Y
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2016
  14. marvin100

    marvin100 Well-Known Member

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    Marjorie Garber is my favorite Shakespeare commentator.
     
    1 person likes this.
  15. VaderDave

    VaderDave Well-Known Member

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    I just read this part last night. :slayer:
     
  16. FLMountainMan

    FLMountainMan Well-Known Member

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    This is probably the best thread on this site. The run on celebrity deaths has me worried that Cormac McCarthy's last book he's writing will never make it out. The guy's in his eighties and hasn't exactly taken good care of himself. And he's been working on three novels for almost 7 years now.
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2016
  17. Kid Nickels

    Kid Nickels Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]


    A friend of mine edited this and since I've read all of Poe I thought I'd give it a shot. Haven't finished all of the selections, but it's a good group and a nice jumping off point for fans of horror stories.

    Leslie also knows everything about Sherlock Holmes so if you're into that check out some of his other books.
     
    1 person likes this.
  18. erictheobscure

    erictheobscure Well-Known Member

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    So if that's your favorite passage, the book to read is Gordon Braden's _Renaissance Tragedy and the Senecan Tradition: Anger's Privilege_. An amazingly good scholarly book.
     
    1 person likes this.
  19. VaderDave

    VaderDave Well-Known Member

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    I finished King Lear late last night. Now I'm reading A Doubter's Almanac by Ethan Canin.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-T337A using Tapatalk
     
  20. lawyerdad

    lawyerdad Well-Known Member

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    Cool. Will check it out. Or forget. One or the other.
     

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