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What are you reading?

Discussion in 'Entertainment, Culture, and Sports' started by chorse123, Mar 13, 2006.

  1. KamoteJoe

    KamoteJoe Well-Known Member

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    I'm going to start either the Goldfinch or Secret History after my current book. Do you recommend either one to start?

    [​IMG]
    After finishing this, I'll have read 4/5ths of Dostoevsky's major novels.
     
    1 person likes this.
  2. HORNS

    HORNS Well-Known Member

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    I've never ready Secret History, but I'm searching for it in used book stores now.
     
  3. edinatlanta

    edinatlanta Well-Known Member

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    I read the Stranger and while I loved it, I just didn't get the same existential questions others had afterward. I seem to be the only one. Maybe because that's how I am IRL. Are you going to read the Meursault Investigation?


    Read it while I was trapped in Africa. It was fitting.

    Finally finished A High Wind in Jamaica. What an absolutely brilliant book. If anyone is looking for wonderfully cracker-jack writing with beautiful language and plenty of action.. this is it.

    Now I'm reading Dr. No. Predict I'll be going on a bit of a Bond trip before the next William Galbraith book comes out.
     
  4. lawyerdad

    lawyerdad Well-Known Member

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    Racist. Arab lives matter.
     
  5. lasbar

    lasbar Well-Known Member

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    L'Etranger and La Nausee are great books.:slayer:

    Even The Cure sang about the first one.
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2015
  6. VaderDave

    VaderDave Well-Known Member

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    When I was in college I met a guy who had a friend who was supposed to read The Stranger in his senior English class. He didn't read the book, but had heard the Cure song and knew that it was somehow related to the book, so he tried to BS his way through his final exam essay by quoting parts of the Cure song.

    He got an F, unfortunately.
     
    1 person likes this.
  7. dragos25

    dragos25 Well-Known Member

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  8. JFST

    JFST Well-Known Member

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    I started with the Goldfinch and is her best book by her IMO.
     
  9. i10casual

    i10casual Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]

    Just picked this up. Pulp fiction with a lot of research in it. I'm enjoying it for some summer noir fun.
     
  10. dizzy

    dizzy Well-Known Member

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    Currently halfway through both A Thousand Years of Solitude and If On A Winter's Night A Traveler. I haven't really enjoyed the first so far. His writing just feels so monotone. It's comfortable I guess, but not very interesting. Don't really feel compelled to finish it. I felt the same way about Love In the Time of Cholera, but at least that novel had something resembling a plot. If On A Winter's Night A Traveler was frustrating at first, but I've started to get into it.
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2015
    1 person likes this.
  11. lawyerdad

    lawyerdad Well-Known Member

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    Two of my favorite novels ever ^, especially One Hundred Years of Solitude (which I assume is what you mean). Different strokes and all that, but I won't be looking to dizz for book recommendations. :)



    “Many years later, as he faced the firing squad, Colonel Aureliano Buendía was to remember that distant afternoon when his father took him to discover ice...”



    Just finished The Talented Mr. Ripley, in part because of recommendations here. I enjoyed it. Solid read, like everything I've read by Highsmith.
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2015
    2 people like this.
  12. SchwererGustav

    SchwererGustav Well-Known Member

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    lawyerdad, you have great taste.

    To dizz: I recall not liking the first few pages the first time I read it, but then the story kept on unfolding and it was glorious.
     
  13. dizzy

    dizzy Well-Known Member

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    Lol yes, A Hundred Years of Solitude. I guess his writing style just makes it seem like a thousand to me. I have similar pace issues with Murakami, although I'm generally more intrigued by his stories. It's funny because what turned me around on the Calvino novel was its suggestion of reading solely for the act of reading. I can't seem to do that with GGM, but I don't regret reading his work. I also have Brave New World waiting in the wings.


    The story is fine, but the writing is so detached that it feels like there's nothing at stake. Perhaps it's because of the third person narration. Everything seems to just be met with a meh.
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2015
  14. lawyerdad

    lawyerdad Well-Known Member

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    Interesting. I generally find Murakami's storytelling, taken for itself, to be weak. His most recent novel, Colorless Whatever Whatever, is (for me) a prime example of that. The plot barely moves, and the resolution is pretty unsatisfying. But his writing itself makes him well worth reading -- to steal an apt observation from a friend of mine, I always feel like his writing changes my perception of reality a little bit.

    I think it's also kind of funny that we're in Marquez, Calvino and Murakami, we're discussing three writers whom most of us here (myself included) have only read in translation. Among other things, I think that underscores an obvious point, that the skill (or lack thereof) of the translator plays a hugely important role. With all three of these writers I've always felt (although I obviously can't really judge) that the translations are excellent, because I feel like I'm experiencing the author's distinctive voice with the fact of translation intruding upon the experience. I've read other books where the translation seemed clunky (or perhaps the text just didn't lend itself well to translation), and my reading experience was repeatedly disrupted by phrases that struck me as odd and made me consciously wonder whether there was a translation issue.

    I read an interview long ago in which Murakami discussed the importance of his close relationship with his English translator. And I think everything I've ever read by Calvino (which I believe is every novel he's ever published plus assorted stories and essays) was translated by William Weaver, so at the very least whatever the translator's idiosyncrasies were adding to the mix was consistent across books . . .
     
    2 people like this.
  15. dizzy

    dizzy Well-Known Member

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    I agree that Murakami's stories are usually disappointing in that they leave a lot of questions unanswered. I think he does this purposefully to add further abstraction to the surreal worlds he creates. It isn't all that gratifying, but it feels intriguing in a Twin Peaks sort of way.

    You bring up a good point about all three being translations. That was something I hadn't even considered, or really noticed while reading.
     
    1 person likes this.
  16. indesertum

    indesertum Well-Known Member

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    oh wow. never thought of murakami as related to Twin Peaks, but that's totally part of the intrigue. all the ones i've read kinda are the same tho. there's also this heavy element of weird sex shit
     
  17. Joffrey

    Joffrey Well-Known Member

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    Wrapped this up a few days ago. Very fun. Lost track of which character was which after a while but didn't affect the enjoyment:

    [​IMG]

    Going to have to wait a while for a new book.
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2015
  18. edinatlanta

    edinatlanta Well-Known Member

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    Ian Fleming is such a good author. Bond in the books is so different from Bond in the movies. I like both, they just scratch different itches.
     
    1 person likes this.
  19. Concordia

    Concordia Well-Known Member

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    There is a nice scholarly article by David Cannadine about Bond.

    One thing to remember is that Fleming started by sketching a self-portrait: boring upper-class sprig serving his country and fighting boredom. His own preference for the film was (the young) Roger Moore. After the first two films, he filled out the portrait with a few Connery details. Even then, of course, Bond was a far cry from the World Famous Secret Agent that Hollywood manufactured.
     
  20. CBrown85

    CBrown85 Well-Known Member

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    Literary Bond is a far more interesting and well rounded character than his counterpart in the movies.
    If On A Winter's Night was entertaining. It's brilliant if you're into post-modern fiction. A lot of books since have tried to emulate and aren't as successful; that said, it's a fun read.

    I've read them a while ago, but the Foundation series is pretty great sci-fi for those into it.

    I'm currently balls deep in some John Dewey pedagogy stuff, I am Malala, and Apatow's interview book which is actually a good read. Looking for something pulpy next. True Detective season two ain't cutting it.
     

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