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Well, at least I didn't get raped

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by Arethusa, Jun 26, 2006.

  1. Arethusa

    Arethusa Well-Known Member

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    Mar 9, 2006
    Are you still in the Palo Alto area? Part of the problem is the expense of living there, which is high even for CA--too damn many software engineers--except for east Palo Alto, which is less expensive but not a place you want to be at all. If you can stay with a friend in that area, though, for a few months at no or low rent, I'd say do it and save your pennies. Get that coffee shop job that Johnapril described (Starbucks actually pays pretty well and has good HR policies), enroll in a community college in Palo Alto, San Jose, or in San Francisco proper (even in SF, you can CalTrain up there and MUNI within the City--no need for a car--but I can't remember whether SF has a CC within the City), get that 3.5 GPA and complete the IGETC (IIRC) requirements, and transfer to a UC school. Oakland is less expensive but also much less hospitable, though if you get a place near a BART or bus line you needn't spend much non-sleep time there. Places like Dublin, Pleasanton, or Martinez would also have slightly lower rents, but could give you proximity to BART, which keeps your options open even w/o a car, and proximity to East-Bay CCs with decent transfer rates to the UC.
    I am. I'll be staying here at least long enough to buy a new car, and depending on how viable school, work, and a place to live look at that point, I may stay here yet. What are the IGETC requirements? Also, do you have any idea what I'd need to get/prove residency, or at least get enough aid to let me go to school out here? Tracking down solid information on that has been somewhat dodgy, and I've not had good experiences with financial aid counselors.
     
  2. johnapril

    johnapril Well-Known Member

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    Residency in California, as I remember it, required living there for 1 year. You probably need a utility bill, but I can't be sure. I wouldn't ask anyone at the schools. I would try the state government.
     
  3. johnapril

    johnapril Well-Known Member

    Messages:
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    The following will be accepted as proof of intent to establish California residence for tuition purposes:

    * State and federal tax returns with W-2 forms
    * Automobile registration
    * California driver's license/California ID card
    * Voter registration
    * Military personnel: active duty
    * Bank account statements
    * California license for professional practice/membership in California organizations
    * Petitioner for divorce in California
    * Utility bills
    * Proof of employment (pay stubs)
    * Mortgage statements
    * Verification of public assistance

    Conduct inconsistent with a claim for California residence includes but is not limited to:

    * Maintaining voter registration and voting in another state.
    * Being a petitioner for a divorce or lawsuit as a resident in another state.
    * Attending an out-of-state institution as a resident of that state.
    * Declaring nonresidence for California income tax purposes.
    * Driver's license and/or vehicle registration in another state
    * In the U.S. with a nonresident visa

    Please note the following requirements:

    Generally, intent cannot be proved with only one or two pieces of evidence. The more evidence you can present to show intent, the easier it is to become a California resident for tuition purposes. A person begins to establish intent by doing as many of the above mentioned actions AS SOON AS POSSIBLE after their arrival in California.
     
  4. Tyto

    Tyto Well-Known Member

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    Dec 20, 2004
    Location:
    SoCal
    I am. I'll be staying here at least long enough to buy a new car, and depending on how viable school, work, and a place to live look at that point, I may stay here yet. What are the IGETC requirements? Also, do you have any idea what I'd need to get/prove residency, or at least get enough aid to let me go to school out here? Tracking down solid information on that has been somewhat dodgy, and I've not had good experiences with financial aid counselors.
    Johnapril beat me to the residency.

    IGETC used to be (may still be) the requirements you needed to fulfull to be eligible to transfer to a UC from a CC--although they had classes in common with what you need for an AA or AS degree, they aren't the same, and IGETC is (was?) critical for transfer. The counseling office of any CC should have the list/table.

    Also, there used to be a list of prerequisite classes you needed to complete to enter the UC as an upperclassman (junior) in your major. This should also be available from the counseling office. My recollection was that the degree counselors at UCLA weren't as much help here as they could have been in this regard.
     
  5. Arethusa

    Arethusa Well-Known Member

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    Mar 9, 2006
    Ah, thanks. At the very least, I can worry about that after I've found a place I'm going to live and a school nearby. Any idea what aid's like before getting residency? Do I just have to plan on waiting another year, or is it possible to get enough aid to cover a year of out of state tuition?
     
  6. johnapril

    johnapril Well-Known Member

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    Check out what the US Government is offering. I snatched up a couple loans for my second year of grad school at YOU ESS SEE in a heart beat. All I had to do was pay them back.
     
  7. globetrotter

    globetrotter Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    greater chicago
    drove today from ny to chicago - about 850 miles door to door in about 14 hours with breaks. no scenery to talk about. books on tape were very helpful.
     
  8. Reggs

    Reggs Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    The Internet
  9. thereverend

    thereverend Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    127
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    Nov 3, 2006
    Ah, thanks. At the very least, I can worry about that after I've found a place I'm going to live and a school nearby. Any idea what aid's like before getting residency? Do I just have to plan on waiting another year, or is it possible to get enough aid to cover a year of out of state tuition?
    Hi, I am just finishing up my work at the community college here in San Mateo (about 15-20 miles south of san francisco). One of the guys I used to work with was not a CA resident, and he had all of his (immense) fees paid for by the government. The aid he received was called Board of Governer, or BOG. He was about $9000 in and they paid it all. BTW, the community colleges here are well regarded for the most part, in fact probably the most well regarded in the state. Foothill College is nearby you, as well as Canada College in Redwood City, College of San Mateo (CSM), and Skyline College in San Bruno. Further north is City College of San Francisco. I have taken classes at CSM, Canada, and Skyline, all of which have been excellent. It is also very easy to transfer to a UC from any of these schools. CSM boasts one of the highest transfer rates in the state. In fact, I am transferring to UC Davis in January on a TAA. The TAA is an agreement between the school and me saying that if I complete the 60 units specified on the agreement in the specified amount of time and maintain a 2.9 (or it might even be 2.8, I can't remember) GPA that I am guaranteed admission to UC Davis. Most of the other UC's have similar agreements, Davis is probably the most accessible school. If you are planning on studying engineering a TAA might not be available, and if it is the GPA will be 3.1 for all except for CSEE, which was 3.4 for a while, then moved back down to 3.1. I think it is very possible to live here and go to school. Just go to a bank, take out a loan, get a job, get BOG, find a place to live on www.craigslist.com and you are set to go. The Bay Area, while somewhat high strung, is a nice place to live with good weather year round, San Francisco if you like cities, pretty hillsides/coastlines if you like that sort of thing, etc. As far as the living situation, I think someone else has mentioned it already, but I will reiterate. The Palo Alto/Menlo Park/Los Altos/Atherton areas are not just a more expensive area to live in in CA, it is the most expensive place to live in the US. I am not speaking in jest, either, read this for more info: http://moneycentral.msn.com/content/...es/P116286.asp Anyway, good luck to you, I am sure you will be fine. Just learn to use the public transit, get a bike (and prepare to climb lots of hills where you are staying), and enjoy California.
     
  10. Stax

    Stax Well-Known Member

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    858
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    May 31, 2006
    Location:
    Bay Area

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