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Tricker 1829 Collection

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by hasa, Nov 9, 2004.

  1. hasa

    hasa New Member

    Messages:
    4
    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2004
    I recently discovered this site and after lurking for awhile,I've decided to make my first posting. (Great site,by the way.). I have been lookin for a classic wing-tip,but most of the lasts used are not very elegant. Does the box-toe on the 1829 line work OK with the classic styling of a wing-tip? Can they be dressed up and down? Any info. on this line will also be appreciated.TIA.
     
  2. jcusey

    jcusey Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,802
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2003
    Are you talking about this model? [​IMG] I think that the toe looks very sophisticated -- not exactly bespoke, but very attractive. It works well with the wingtip pattern. I have no personal experience with Tricker's shoes, but I've been very impressed with the pictures that I've seen -- channelled soles, high-quality leathers, etc., and the prices are right. Others on this forum and the Ask Andy forum have had a lot of nice things to say about the quality of construction.
     
  3. Kaga

    Kaga Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    382
    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2004
    Location:
    KS Prefecture
    Trickers' quality is superb. Better than benchgrade C&J and approaching that of C&J handgrade. An excellent value for money. The last shapes are not quite as elegant as C&J's though, but they are undoubtedly classic shapes for classic shoes.
     
  4. Horace

    Horace Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,447
    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2004
    (hasa @ 09 Nov. 2004, 10:35) I recently discovered this site and after lurking for awhile,I've decided to make my first posting. (Great site,by the way.). I have been lookin for a classic wing-tip,but most of the lasts used are not very elegant. Does the box-toe on the 1829 line work OK with the classic styling of a wing-tip? Can they be dressed up and down? Any info. on this line will also be appreciated.TIA.
    Trickers' quality is superb. Better than benchgrade C&J and approaching that of C&J handgrade. An excellent value for money. The last shapes are not quite as elegant as C&J's though, but they are undoubtedly classic shapes for classic shoes.
    I was on Jermyn St. not too long ago -- admiring Trickers. Sorry I can't offer anything concrete as I didn't buy -- but I should have. This in addition to the split-toe Norweg. cordovan Alden blucher, will be my next shoe purchase. I really like the tough as lead look of the Tricker country line. I am a little reluctant to attempt a pair from pediwear as I want to insure best fit.
     
  5. schimanski

    schimanski New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2004
    I own a pair of Trickers loafers; they are nice but not as nice as churchs
     
  6. STYLESTUDENT

    STYLESTUDENT Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,135
    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2004
    Location:
    SE Michigan (frequent NYC visitor)
    I've had Trickers shoes both direct from England and years ago when they were Dunhill's house brand, in both penny loafers and captoes. They're durable and well-made. With the skyrocketing costs for C&J, they're an attractive alternative (but there are few selections in the wider fittings except for the plain captoe).
     
  7. JLibourel

    JLibourel Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    8,602
    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2004
    Horace, I have respected your literacy and high level of erudition. Anyone who can cite Werner Jaeger's Paideia in a clothing forum has got to be a man I respect. (I have the set, read it 40-odd years ago, don't remember much, if anything, from it.) However, I am at a loss to understand what you mean by "tough as lead." Lead is one of the most soft and malleable elemental metals around. Unalloyed, it is easily gouged with a thumbnail. (I used to do a lot of bullet casting until I felt it might be affecting my health adversely, so I do know my way around lead.)
     
  8. NoVaguy

    NoVaguy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
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    Oct 15, 2004
    Location:
    Guv'mintFlunkyLand
    JLibourel- You're almost there, given the bullet casting comment.... Think of bullets made from lead. Then "tough as lead" would mean "bulletproof". As least, that's how I read it.
     
  9. NoVaguy

    NoVaguy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,529
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    Oct 15, 2004
    Location:
    Guv'mintFlunkyLand
    However, "tough as lead" is not very common. I only got one quasi-legitimate hit on google..... and amazon's inside the book search turned up "tough as a lead pipe", with everything else seemingly garbage.

    So there you guys go. I'm not touching this issue again...
     
  10. Horace

    Horace Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,447
    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2004
    (JLibourel @ 20 Nov. 2004, 9:09) However, I am at a loss to understand what you mean by "tough as lead." Lead is one of the most soft and malleable elemental metals around. Unalloyed, it is easily gouged with a thumbnail. (I used to do a lot of bullet casting until I felt it might be affecting my health adversely, so I do know my way around lead.)
    JL and NVG: I don't know what I was thinking -- lead is malleable (and I am trying to recall where it is on the periodical chart) -- I have no idea why I wrote that. Maybe I was thinking "tough as a bullet" -- and I cannot recall the figure of speech where you take one quality of something and extract from it the meaning for the whole -- it's not metonmy, I don't think. Maybe I picked up the phrase from that much neglected genre of American fiction -- the noir crime novels of Chandler, Hammett, etc. Let me get back to you on this.
     
  11. AJL

    AJL Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,626
    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2004
    heavy as lead.

    tough as nails...?
     

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