1. Welcome to the new Styleforum!

    We hope you’re as excited as we are to hang out in the new place. There are more new features that we’ll announce in the near future, but for now we hope you’ll enjoy the new site.

    We are currently fine-tuning the forum for your browsing pleasure, so bear with any lingering dust as we work to make Styleforum even more awesome than it was.

    Oh, and don’t forget to head over to the Styleforum Journal, because we’re giving away two pairs of Carmina shoes to celebrate our move!

    Please address any questions about using the new forum to support@styleforum.net

    Cheers,

    The Styleforum Team

    Dismiss Notice

Transparent Moderation Log & Site Topics - Part I

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by j, May 7, 2006.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. hossoso

    hossoso Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,804
    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2006
    Location:
    Seattle upon Rust
    How do you know so much about Hot Walrus Sack?
     
  2. sonick

    sonick Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,031
    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2003
    Location:
    Vancouver
    Where can I find the Relationship Break Up thread? I can't seem to find it....
     
  3. why

    why Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,735
    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2007
    HWS is real, he is not a sock puppet and he is legitimately a foreigner. He is also funny if you don't read his threaks like you read The Economist.

    I was thinking about this when I was running and concluded that he's most likely foreign. A few things came to mind:

    He always says 'lip the pussy', which makes no sense in any other language because licking is always assumed to come from the tongue and not the lips. The only single word I can think of that involves both the lips and the act of licking (via the tongue) are the reflexive verbs that translate as 'to lick one's lips'. Unless hws were a poster with a lot of linguistics training to adequately hide a morphological mistake as phonetic (why go through all the trouble?), he is most likely a legitimate foreigner confusing 'lip' and 'lick' with each other because of their similar connection to the human face as well as the the plosive consonants on the end of each word being phonetically similar (unvoiced plosives only separated by a small difference in the location of the articulators -- coincidentally, the lips and tongue). A foreigner trying to learn these words most likely originally would hear them in speech and try to phonetically transcribe them (confusing the K in 'lick' with the P in 'lip'), whereas someone who isn't exposed to the words in speech would almost always get the phrasing correct since 'lick' translates quite literally across all Indo-European languages due to a common etymological root (leigh-*).

    Less complicated than the above is the translation of his prepositions. When I asked if he lived in Switzerland (the country where he'd most likely hear German, French, and Italian which he commonly uses words and phrasing from in his English), he said 'I live close of Alps'. He's using the preposition 'a' which generally means 'to' unless it's referring to a location of origin in which case it best translates as 'of'. It's unlikely that somebody simply messing around with an online translator could replicate this common mistake unless he were specifically trying to make the mistake in the first place, which would presuppose knowledge of the intricacies of translation (meaning he had already learned both and was well-versed in them as well as their idiomatic differences -- unlikely).

    What really threw me off was how he used 'Flugzeug' instead of 'airplane', which made no sense to me at all. The words are recent lexical entries and have no common phonetic or morphological root. They don't even come close to translating by cognative relationship, so why would he mistake one for the other? But this doesn't mean he's a sock puppet messing around with online translators, it simply means he is using translators. Given the two aforementioned examples (of which I'm sure there's more), this mistake can be indicative of nothing more than a mistake in itself; the phonological evidence in my first example seems to indicate that he's exposed to at least three foreign languages in his everyday life (which is why I guessed he was Swiss).
     
  4. hossoso

    hossoso Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,804
    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2006
    Location:
    Seattle upon Rust
    I was thinking about this when I was running and concluded that he's most likely foreign. A few things came to mind:

    He always says 'lip the pussy', which makes no sense in any other language because licking is always assumed to come from the tongue and not the lips. The only single word I can think of that involves both the lips and the act of licking (via the tongue) are the reflexive verbs that translate as 'to lick one's lips'. Unless hws were a poster with a lot of linguistics training to adequately hide a morphological mistake as phonetic (why go through all the trouble?), he is most likely a legitimate foreigner confusing 'lip' and 'lick' with each other because of their similar connection to the human face as well as the the plosive consonants on the end of each word being phonetically similar (unvoiced plosives only separated by a small difference in the location of the articulators -- coincidentally, the lips and tongue). A foreigner trying to learn these words most likely originally would hear them in speech and try to phonetically transcribe them (confusing the K in 'lick' with the P in 'lip'), whereas someone who isn't exposed to the words in speech would almost always get the phrasing correct since 'lick' translates quite literally across all Indo-European languages due to a common etymological root (leigh-*).

    Less complicated than the above is the translation of his prepositions. When I asked if he lived in Switzerland (the country where he'd most likely hear German, French, and Italian which he commonly uses words and phrasing from in his English), he said 'I live close of Alps'. He's using the preposition 'a' which generally means 'to' unless it's referring to a location of origin in which case it best translates as 'of'. It's unlikely that somebody simply messing around with an online translator could replicate this common mistake unless he were specifically trying to make the mistake in the first place, which would presuppose knowledge of the intricacies of translation (meaning he had already learned both and was well-versed in them -- unlikely).

    What really threw me off was how he used 'Flugzeug' instead of 'airplane', which made no sense to me at all. The words are recent lexical entries and have no common phonetic or morphological root. They don't even come close to translating, so why would he mistake one for the other? But this doesn't mean he's a sock puppet messing around with online translators, it simply means he is using online translators. Given the two aforementioned examples (of which I'm sure there's more), this mistake can be indicative of nothing more than a mistake in itself; the phonological evidence in my first example seems to indicate that he's exposed to at least three foreign languages in his everyday life (which is why I guessed he was Swiss).


    I was just about to post this exact same thing!
     
  5. rach2jlc

    rach2jlc Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    14,790
    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2006
    Location:
    Monaco
    I was thinking about this when I was running and concluded that he's most likely foreign. A few things came to mind: He always says 'lip the pussy', which makes no sense in any other language because licking is always assumed to come from the tongue and not the lips. The only single word I can think of that involves both the lips and the act of licking (via the tongue) are the reflexive verbs that translate as 'to lick one's lips'. Unless hws were a poster with a lot of linguistics training to adequately hide a morphological mistake as phonetic (why go through all the trouble?), he is most likely a legitimate foreigner confusing 'lip' and 'lick' with each other because of their similar connection to the human face as well as the the plosive consonants on the end of each word being phonetically similar (unvoiced plosives only separated by a small difference in the location of the articulators -- coincidentally, the lips and tongue). A foreigner trying to learn these words most likely originally would hear them in speech and try to phonetically transcribe them (confusing the K in 'lick' with the P in 'lip'), whereas someone who isn't exposed to the words in speech would almost always get the phrasing correct since 'lick' translates quite literally across all Indo-European languages due to a common etymological root (leigh-*). Less complicated than the above is the translation of his prepositions. When I asked if he lived in Switzerland (the country where he'd most likely hear German, French, and Italian which he commonly uses words and phrasing from in his English), he said 'I live close of Alps'. He's using the preposition 'a' which generally means 'to' unless it's referring to a location of origin in which case it best translates as 'of'. It's unlikely that somebody simply messing around with an online translator could replicate this common mistake unless he were specifically trying to make the mistake in the first place, which would presuppose knowledge of the intricacies of translation (meaning he had already learned both and was well-versed in them as well as their idiomatic differences -- unlikely). What really threw me off was how he used 'Flugzeug' instead of 'airplane', which made no sense to me at all. The words are recent lexical entries and have no common phonetic or morphological root. They don't even come close to translating by cognative relationship, so why would he mistake one for the other? But this doesn't mean he's a sock puppet messing around with online translators, it simply means he is using translators. Given the two aforementioned examples (of which I'm sure there's more), this mistake can be indicative of nothing more than a mistake in itself; the phonological evidence in my first example seems to indicate that he's exposed to at least three foreign languages in his everyday life (which is why I guessed he was Swiss).
    Poetry, obscure linguistic and discourse analysis, fine French cuisine.... SWOON! [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] Anyway, I'm sticking to my story that he's a Romanian Gypsy with a satellite internet hookup in his caravan. [​IMG]
    After calling out Vaclav, I've given up pointing these things. Doesn't really seem to do any good.
    I know. Us SLA folk are such wet blankets. [​IMG]
     
  6. Etienne

    Etienne Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,666
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2006
    Location:
    Paris
    Poetry, obscure linguistic and discourse analysis, fine French cuisine.... SWOON! [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Don't mind me, I am just taking notes in prevision of our future dinner date at the Eiffel Tower.
     
  7. why

    why Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,735
    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2007
    I guess what got lost among all my words was that hws is commonly exposed to separate spoken languages in his everyday life, which indicates he either lives in an isogloss most likely near Switzerland or he's a janitor at a university linguistics department. Well, at least that's what I'd bet on.

    Poetry, obscure linguistic and discourse analysis, fine French cuisine.... SWOON! [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    I'm sure a linguistics professor is laughing at my elementary analysis while he's busy recreating mood and aspect in some ancient Semitic language or something.
     
  8. shoreman1782

    shoreman1782 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    8,739
    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2004
    Location:
    DMV
    Yeah, dude can barely speak english!

    The WEF seems to be a collection of self-important people, like Bilderbergers. I do remember what Bono said a few years ago. It is somewhat ironic that intellectually pretentious organizations use people like Bono and Angelina Jolie to promote their agendas.

    Golden Bale is not advertised to be a Super wool. Or at least I have never seen a "Super" Golden Bale fabric. 80s is the highest micron wool I have seen called a Super. Most wool-based fabrics I have seen not labeled Super, including "summer" and "winter" wool+mohair fabrics, are described as Super 90s, sometimes Super 100s, on export declaration forms. But the labels the weavers provide tailors for these same fabrics, which some sew into finished garments, make no mention of the word Super, just "wool and mohair," and variations of this.
     
  9. MetroStyles

    MetroStyles Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    15,831
    Joined:
    May 4, 2006
    Location:
    New York Shitty
  10. why

    why Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,735
    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2007
    In August 2009 he goes between his trademark broken English and a much more fluent English.

    I have stuff to do but I'll return to ponder more...as a professor once told me 'Careful with this stuff. It will make you crazy'. [​IMG]
     
  11. Teacher

    Teacher Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    12,939
    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2005
    Location:
    Grand Forks, ND, USA
    In August 2009 he goes between his trademark broken English and a much more fluent English.
    :


    Yes, that's why I'm convinced he's an act. Lately he's been consistently more ungrammatical.

    By the way, 'a' isn't a preposition, it an article.
     
  12. MetroStyles

    MetroStyles Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    15,831
    Joined:
    May 4, 2006
    Location:
    New York Shitty
    Yes, that's why I'm convinced he's an act. Lately he's been consistently more ungrammatical.

    By the way, 'a' isn't a preposition, it an article.


    I think he was referring to the preposition "a" in Romance languages.
     
  13. Huntsman

    Huntsman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,732
    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2004
    I was thinking about this when I was running and concluded that he's most likely foreign. A few things came to mind: He always says 'lip the pussy', which makes no sense in any other language because licking is always assumed to come from the tongue and not the lips. The only single word I can think of that involves both the lips and the act of licking (via the tongue) are the reflexive verbs that translate as 'to lick one's lips'. Unless hws were a poster with a lot of linguistics training to adequately hide a morphological mistake as phonetic (why go through all the trouble?), he is most likely a legitimate foreigner confusing 'lip' and 'lick' with each other because of their similar connection to the human face as well as the the plosive consonants on the end of each word being phonetically similar (unvoiced plosives only separated by a small difference in the location of the articulators -- coincidentally, the lips and tongue). A foreigner trying to learn these words most likely originally would hear them in speech and try to phonetically transcribe them (confusing the K in 'lick' with the P in 'lip'), whereas someone who isn't exposed to the words in speech would almost always get the phrasing correct since 'lick' translates quite literally across all Indo-European languages due to a common etymological root (leigh-*). Less complicated than the above is the translation of his prepositions. When I asked if he lived in Switzerland (the country where he'd most likely hear German, French, and Italian which he commonly uses words and phrasing from in his English), he said 'I live close of Alps'. He's using the preposition 'a' which generally means 'to' unless it's referring to a location of origin in which case it best translates as 'of'. It's unlikely that somebody simply messing around with an online translator could replicate this common mistake unless he were specifically trying to make the mistake in the first place, which would presuppose knowledge of the intricacies of translation (meaning he had already learned both and was well-versed in them as well as their idiomatic differences -- unlikely). What really threw me off was how he used 'Flugzeug' instead of 'airplane', which made no sense to me at all. The words are recent lexical entries and have no common phonetic or morphological root. They don't even come close to translating by cognative relationship, so why would he mistake one for the other? But this doesn't mean he's a sock puppet messing around with online translators, it simply means he is using translators. Given the two aforementioned examples (of which I'm sure there's more), this mistake can be indicative of nothing more than a mistake in itself; the phonological evidence in my first example seems to indicate that he's exposed to at least three foreign languages in his everyday life (which is why I guessed he was Swiss).
    I wish my mechanics were even 1/100th of this, even if a linguistics prof could chew it up, and even if you're entirely wrong.
    hws = why
    Awesome.
     
  14. rach2jlc

    rach2jlc Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    14,790
    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2006
    Location:
    Monaco
    I'm sure a linguistics professor is laughing at my elementary analysis while he's busy recreating mood and aspect in some ancient Semitic language or something.
    Well, I still think it's pretty cool. [​IMG] I do little with detailed linguistic analysis in my own work, even less with European languages, and almost nothing with specific grammars... so it's neat to see how other people approach articulating what is "hidden" in the plain view of text. One of the most interesting things to me is how people "read" and the strategies they use to articulate meaning or interpret. In my quick "I think HWS is full of shit" bit, I never even thought to look at it in terms of linguistics to that degree. Instead, I was (while very generally) just thinking of it in terms of habits or textual practices... the sorts of patterns used in writing, both "correctly" and "incorrectly." They seemed "off" to me, or suspicious.
    In August 2009 he goes between his trademark broken English and a much more fluent English. I have stuff to do but I'll return to ponder more...as a professor once told me 'Careful with this stuff. It will make you crazy'. [​IMG]
    He also seems to have a "meme-literacy" (for lack of a better word) far out of whack with his writing competency. One might say he's just copying them, but they seem largely to be used correctly, in the right places, while the grammar or words around them are not. That's also a bit fishy, because despite his L1 or his competency therein, that kind of metalinguistic awareness won't come with somebody who is still at the level of "you must to vote." [​IMG]
     
  15. Thomas

    Thomas Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    29,119
    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2006
    Location:
    Texas
    I think hws is T's creation. Thomas set the bar too damn high with ElHawat.

    Thanks, but I'm out of the sock puppet business.

    I am considering having 'crotchless burkha' put on my headstone, though. I was kind of proud of that one.
     
  16. rach2jlc

    rach2jlc Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    14,790
    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2006
    Location:
    Monaco
    Thanks, but I'm out of the sock puppet business.

    I am considering having 'crotchless burkha' put on my headstone, though. I was kind of proud of that one.


    I've always wanted a sockpuppet, but I have absolutely no ability to write or talk any differently than I do normally. As such, I think people would realize it was me really quickly and all fun would be lost. [​IMG]
     
  17. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    14,384
    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2006
    Location:
    The wild and the pure.
    I've always wanted a sockpuppet, but I have absolutely no ability to write or talk any differently than I do normally. As such, I think people would realize it was me really quickly and all fun would be lost. [​IMG]
    You can borrow one of mine.
     
  18. oneeightyseven

    oneeightyseven Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,677
    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2008
    I've always wanted a sockpuppet, but I have absolutely no ability to write or talk any differently than I do normally. As such, I think people would realize it was me really quickly and all fun would be lost. [​IMG]

    no offense but youre too smart for a sock puppet. Youll drop "insouciant" and everyone will be all [​IMG]
     
  19. Bhowie

    Bhowie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    13,099
    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2008
    Location:
    Running the trap house.
    You can borrow one of mine.

    24k posts on this acct + total of all sock posts = [​IMG]
     
  20. robin

    robin Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    12,416
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2006
    I've always wanted a sockpuppet, but I have absolutely no ability to write or talk any differently than I do normally. As such, I think people would realize it was me really quickly and all fun would be lost. [​IMG]
    Really? I was certain that Grandmaster Baggins belongs to you.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by