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To those who attended 'mediocre' universities...

Discussion in 'Business, Careers & Education' started by wj4, Mar 4, 2012.

  1. chogall

    chogall Well-Known Member

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    no.

    but still better than chico state.
     
  2. imatlas

    imatlas Well-Known Member

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    I can't tell if you're denigrating Cal Poly or CSU in general? I've worked with a number of Cal Poly grads and know a couple of professors there, it's a very solid school.
     
  3. gettoasty

    gettoasty Well-Known Member

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    i am young (even though in my head i feel pretty damn old), jobless, and spending money like crazy.

    i know what i want in life, but it's only half the battle as knowing how to get there is the real fight.
    * * *
    is something going to happen soon? hopefully
    am i scared? only some days

    i am by nature very in tune with a life of solitude. introverted and probably biggest continuing regret is not being able to network properly.
    on the upside, because of this i am a very observant individual and when called upon, my skills and learning curve shine out compared to others of my same skill set who do more talking than walking.

    or: novice --> intermediate --> expert, i like to think i am between intermediate and an expert (tailing closer to intermediate in my field) compared to similar peers IMO.

    i recommend you go read supertrash on sufu wj4 if you want some more down to earth super confessions of peers around your age.

    you will be berated by majority of members here, or have a lack of socioeconomic experience/guidance it seems you are seeking.

    though I will tell you, depending on your field, a MBA as told by a former student who attended ivy league, is a dying fad. Getting into a field that teaches more the technical skill set needed will be more beneficial (coming from someone in finance)


    and i overheard this in the office the other day:
    graduated from harvard, law degree from yale, journalism at oxford: currently in NYC working in journalism--so successful: 35/f and single

    :( though in the context it was said, it was kind of like "hey you can be successful and all but look at the downside"

    in my head though, i wouldn't mind being in that journalist's shoes.
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2012
  4. plei89

    plei89 Well-Known Member

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    +1 And OP: I can relate to your shoes. But it's what you make out of college. I graduated from a state university with no debt and was able to secure a job in a fortune 500 company within a 1 month of job hunting. These are some tips I have: - Network (get close to those who are in the same field as you) - Take classes that you're interested in (regardless if they're hard) - Intern, Intern, and Intern (and make a difference, there's a difference between just doing you job, and accomplishing something) I had about a handful of internships by the time I graduated and MADE A SIGNIFICANT difference in each of them. While I did have a really high GPA, I feel that it's my internship accomplishments and drive to succeed that really helped me. With that said, you're turning 27 after you complete your MBA. Did you go straight into your MBA? Most of times getting an MBA is useless if you have no working experience. It doesn't sweeten your resume by much..
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2012
  5. Soylent Green

    Soylent Green Well-Known Member

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    I went to a top boarding school and one day, in the spring of my senior year, my AP English teacher told the class something I'll never forget. She said that when we were in college, we should be intimidated by our classmates who hadn't gone to fancy New England boarding schools - not the other way around - because they had got to the same place we had without all of the advantages we had been given. It was good advice.

    Anyway, just work hard, be kind, respect everyone, and fear no one (unless they are a graduate student in econ at MIT - good lord, those people really *are* smart).
     
  6. wj4

    wj4 Well-Known Member

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    Hi.

    Here's some background info about me. I started college in Fall of 2003. I didn't get my BS until Spring of 2009. A combination of working part time too much, didn't pay enough attention, harder than expected classes, switching majors, and the university adding more required GE's to their curriculum held me back about 2 years for the BS. I got my MS in Fall of 2010.

    Getting a job out of college was no problem at all. I applied for a job, and got hired 2 weeks later. My first professional job, although not the highest, paid about ~$50k/year. I stayed with the company for about 14 months and looked for a job elsewhere. I have about 2 years of professional experience at this point. I'll be close to having 3 years of experience once I get my MBA degree. I have $0 in debt.

    I keep a close circle of friends from the program. I also keep in touch with some really great professors, one of them I can wholeheartedly say changed my life.

    The reason I chose to do my MBA now is because it would be hard as I move up the rank and the job demands I work weekends, travel, etc. Also, it would be extremely difficult in several years if I had children to take care of.

    There are some well off kids with no work experience and I know that they can't relate to some of the stuff the professors talk about, ie ethics/legal. That's probably one of my favorite class because I had a bad employer and now I have a great one.

    Dude, you're jobless and you're spending money on clothes? I hope your parents are giving you the money and aren't going in debt because of this crap. I've heard of kids being in debt because of cars. But it was not until I joined this forum that I read kids are in debt because of fashion.

    What is this "supertrash" thing. I know of SuFu since my days on Niketalk, but I never joined/visited. I don't have the time to really do my research for lack of better words. Between working/school and trying to hit the gym at least 4 times a week...I have no time for anything else..except SF every now and then of course!

    MBA may be a dying field, but I wholeheartedly enjoy the courses. I was smiling since the first lecture of the first class. Educating myself further is worth the money by itself even if I never put this degree to use.

    I can easily make a 6 figure income in my field, without the need of pursuing the MBA degree. But enforcements such as OSHA and EPA are non-existing in less developed countries, this is in case I want to pack up one day.

    I'm a weird person at my age, bro. Most people my age just do the 9-5, M-F, and hang out on the weekends. I can't really see myself doing that on a regular basis. Even on my breaks, I would pick up books to improve myself in some aspect. Aside from the 2-3 best friends I have, my other friends are 30+ of age and are well off professions.


    Sorry for the long read. It's also kinda late so excuse any grammar errors.
     
  7. bringusingoodale

    bringusingoodale Well-Known Member

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    You are doing better than the average college grad from the past 3 years (or more).

    You landed a job out of school fairly quickly, check.
    You have maintained professional relationships, check.
    You are avoiding the trappings of having a "good job" at a young age and settling for it, check.

    Don't fret.
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2012
  8. wj4

    wj4 Well-Known Member

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    Like I stated before, a lot of freshly graduated kids think good jobs will just appear on their laps. This is where I took the advantage. Even for the BS program, we were required to pick up a mandatory internship. Most places were paying $12-15/hour or so. I interned for nothing, but it was for JPL/NASA because of the name. I firmly believed that this helped me get my first gig.

    My first job was at an airport, it was about a 60-90 min commute depending on traffic. I was a supervisor. It was great because the dept was relatively new. I get to use what I learn in school and implement ideas. It was not a M-F, 9-5 though. I worked all shifts, from morning to swing to graveyard, as long as my school can be accommodated. There were things I learned that school would never be able to teach me, ie how to interact with employees when they back talk you while giving performance reviews, revising metrics, etc. Especially when some of your workers are gang members, hehe. Most of my classmates would never take this job because it's not a normal job.

    If I had a serious relationship, it would surely not last at that point. I would never get too comfy at a job and stay. I started looking for a job that was closer to home after 1 year of working there. I essentially found it and got a decent pay jump.

    I guess I'm a person that pushes himself by seeing the glass as half full.

    More than anything, I want to be able to provide for myself and parents comfortably when they're older as a thank you.
     
  9. gettoasty

    gettoasty Well-Known Member

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    OSHA/EPA I learned during my 3rd year in my undergraduate business degree - it was actually a 5 week condensed course taught by the supposedly hardest bus. admin professor at the school. Many hated him, few appreciated him as I did. Many could not take the BS and extra reading material plus writing papers every week. Students thought 5+ or 10+ pages were a lot of work whereas I considered it minor. The saddest thing is that no one reads and so when it comes to writing papers or articulating your thoughts whether it be in writing or speech, it become a very taunting task. Having graduated now, I can see myself falling into the latter category. Had a friend graduate before me and he said it was so hard picking back up a book. Didn't believe him then, now I do

    I am by no means knocking at what you are doing wj4 but what is taught in an MBA program is pretty relative to many undergraduate bus. admin degrees nowadays. But that is not really the point you are making, rather 1) Timeliness: Now is a good time for you whereas later down the road, too many priorities will takeaway from your studies and 2) You have an intrinsic value to the degree and the larger experience of the MBA program

    SUFU, in a specific section, has a thread "dedicated" to late teens to early 30 year old's randomly posting about what is happening w/ their life whether it be academic or career wise, which i think your post fits in perfectly. Aside from that relation, I guess if you are truly looking for real world experiences and exchanges, than this is definitely the right place to share..

    FWIW, you and I you and everyone here are not so different in our aspirations and experiences. The only point that really sticks out from your personal anecdote is that you used your network to its full potential, which if you read my post, I have not made use of. And echoing what these types of threads usually end up illustrating is, network and you'll be fine.


    Now I know how you afford all those TOJ's

    [​IMG]


    Most of my purchases are coming out of my own pocket, money here and there. I actually graduated with about 27k in debt, but at a ~ 4% IR, I am not really exaggerating this. Free money from the government



    BTW...

    What exactly are you using your MBA to concentrate in? I gather from your work experience and interests, it is quite a wide breath of fields. IF anything it just sounds like you want to get into general management, which I guess is why an MBA would be important. I ask because I also really enjoyed my ethics class, as mentioned above, and at one point thought about getting into business law and one day become a board member to care for compliance, etc.
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2012
  10. EMY

    EMY Well-Known Member

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    okay I hear this time and time again and I don't doubt that it is extremely beneficial, but for someone like me (MS good school, bad grades) how much would it help? I can't even get an interview since applications always ask me for my GPA and it sucks. I feel like I would have been in better shape with just my BS than with my BS and lousy GPA MS.
     
  11. Nereis

    Nereis Well-Known Member

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    You ask your network (who I assume want you to succeed if only so that you can help them out later if need be) to get you interviews.
     
  12. FLMountainMan

    FLMountainMan Well-Known Member

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    No matter how much you make, someone thinks you're rich and someone thinks you're poor. It's cliched as hell, but the race really is with yourself.
     
  13. wj4

    wj4 Well-Known Member

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    I may switch fields after I get my MBA. MBA, second to none, is probably the most beneficial master's degree out there since it is so broad. One of my company's managers is coming back to school because in order to move up to be a director, they want her to have an business degree. If I do stay in this field, I will move into consulting later on, which the degree will help me I believe if I should open up a firm.

    At my current employer, now a clinical lab setting, many people have multiple degrees and it feels great to work with a group like this.

    Throughout my short professional career, I've come to the conclusion that aside from a few occupations such as doctors, and lawyers, many jobs can be learned on the spot.

    I agree that an MBA has lost its ooohs and wows. Back in the 70s, only a very small population had them. Nowadays, especially with online degrees, they're common.

    ToJs were just the beginning, dude. Since I joined this forum, I could've bought a new fully loaded Accord with the money I spent so far, haha.
     
    1 person likes this.
  14. ndsleep612

    ndsleep612 Well-Known Member

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    It all depends, I have a cousin who got a JD from Harvard yet is the most incompetent lazy person I know who won't work. I still don't understand how Harvard could have picked her unless she had other people get the grades for her. I've met folks from Stanford who are very intelligent and motivated. One of my previous bosses graduated from a mediocre university but worked his way up to become partner of his firm. A person's character is more important than the degree one obtains.
     
  15. otc

    otc Well-Known Member

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    I went to a top tier school that people not familiar with the top schools usually assume is some mediocre state school (since it is not like it even has some big sports team they have heard of). I can't tell whether or not this is good or bad...the people at my firm doing the hiring definitely know it is good since we still have some strong ties to it...but other people in other parts of the country have no idea and I'm not convinced that I am any worse off as a result.

    That probably doesn't help you...but I figured I would just throw it out there. Also, at the entry level, we certainly do hire people from non-top schools. At the high level, its pretty hard to find someone without a tie to a top tier school though...but those who don't usually worked their way up in the industry (i.e. nobody transfers in at the high level from a mediocre school but they are fine bringing up people who show talent no matter what their background is).



    You are the prime candidate for "networking" since it would help you to have an advocate on the inside who doesn't care about your GPA. Of course I hate that term since it recalls the idea of "networking events" where a bunch of kids would hound people with resumes like it was some sort of trading floor where the person to yell the loudest and ask the most inane questions gets the job. I haven't done much of this so I don't really speak from experience but the better option is to do some more informational meetings. Offer to buy an alumni in your industry coffee or lunch and talk with them about the field. Don't straight out ask them for a job--it can be made clear that you are looking and they will understand this but in the the first 15 minutes they know you, they aren't going to stick their neck out for you. Instead follow up with an email or something to keep in contact. Maybe ask for their advice on some other positions you are applying to, let them have a resume and when a position opens up maybe they will think of you.
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2012
  16. jordaanman

    jordaanman Member

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    Not in the slightest. Last year I had a housemate with two MAs (LSE and USC) completing his third with me and another with a lit degree from Oxford. I was also getting as good as or better grades than my classmates, a lot of whom went to better schools. and I could hold my own in any conversation about current affairs, culture etc with the aforementioned housemates. Hell, the Oxford lit grad didn't even know who Goethe was! Pretty much impossible to feel intimidated by such people. My brother's girlfriend was accepted to read Physics at Oxford and you'd never guess in a million years.

    It's people with more experience but the same age that I'm intimidated by.

    My first uni was mid-ranked and my grad school top 20. If I wanted to do a PhD at a top 5 I'm pretty sure I could. I just wish I had similar confidence outside academia, since I don't really care for research!
     
  17. ConcernedParent

    ConcernedParent Well-Known Member

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    I think you undervalue your degree in relation to your friends. Depending on which CSU you went to; there are probably at least a handful that are better than USD or Chapman anyway.

    Though UCLA is basically a low ivy on the West Coast. There's literally only a handful schools within 500 miles regarded better: Stanford, Cal, Pomona College,HarveyMudd/Cal Tech in technical fields... maybe Claremont McK.
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2012
  18. wj4

    wj4 Well-Known Member

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    It was no cake walk for me. I've studied my butt off in several courses, one example that came to mind were the Organic Chem classes where 55% was a solid C and half the class would fail the first time around. But it was more of a money issue than anything. I went to a local Cal State so I wouldn't have to spend money on rent. I didn't have a 'real college' experience, per se

    I just wanted others' inputs on here as well. I only know a handful of folks who got degrees from such pretigious schools, and it still impresses me. They would probably throw away my application so fast when they saw my SAT score, haha.

    I think education is a wonderful thing and if I came from a super wealthy family, I may become a lifetime student. Conversely, I know there are affluent parents who spend tons of money for their kids to pursue the best education money can buy, but the kids are not that motivated, to say the least.

    I know a guy, who is a close friend of a close friend, who got a business degree from UCI. He works at a firm in Beverly Hills. I think he started out at $50k fresh out of college. That was pretty good. Fast forward the story...I didn't talk to him for about 3 years, I ran into him at a mall and talked for a bit. The dude is still at the same place making the same salary. I would've left for a better job, but he is not that really motivated because the money is basically play money. He already got a nice 2 bedroom condo and 2 cars upon graduation...the stuff that most struggle out of college for a good decade or two to acquire.
     
  19. EMY

    EMY Well-Known Member

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    USD and Chapman are crap schools, imo.

    I've read that grades at CSU are extremely tough because there is no curve...but since you mention that 55% is a solid C I am assuming it was curved.
     
  20. Lord-Barrington

    Lord-Barrington Well-Known Member

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    I went to a middling state school and I've always felt good about my education. I did well and really enjoyed it and my professional life hasn't suffered at all from it. The business world is very much interested in what you can DO for a business (generate revenue, improve processes, etc.) not where you studied ten years ago. If you can deliver results, people will rarely care.

    Your education is only a part of you. You should never feel inferior or superior to anyone just because of it.
     
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