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Thoughts on my dream home design (Colonial French-Cambodia)

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by Svenn, Feb 1, 2010.

  1. CTGuy

    CTGuy Well-Known Member

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    funny how many guys are criticizing this and probably live in some Toll Brothers box.
     
  2. tiecollector

    tiecollector Well-Known Member

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    Just use quality materials and it can't look that bad. I am very worried that a house like this might involve lots of stucco for most people though. [​IMG] Finding skilled workers will probably take years. Submitting floorplans and permits will probably take at least 2 years. The actual labor itself will probably take 2 years. Quality materials will probably be at least $500K. If there is lots of vegetation on a hillside, even better. Next to a McMansion, it will certainly seem out of place. There are Asian style buildings all up and down the West Coast.
     
  3. Svenn

    Svenn Well-Known Member

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    Just use quality materials and it can't look that bad. I am very worried that a house like this might involve lots of stucco for most people though. [​IMG] Finding skilled workers will probably take years. Submitting floorplans and permits will probably take at least 2 years. The actual labor itself will probably take 2 years. Quality materials will probably be at least $500K. If there is lots of vegetation on a hillside, even better. Next to a McMansion, it will certainly seem out of place.

    There are Asian style buildings all up and down the West Coast.

    I fear that cost estimate might be accurate... below is my alternative and cheaper plan for a much smaller all-wood over-water house by itself (not three put together like in my original), which actually shouldn't cost more than a normal nice house. I could also feasibly build it on land since I know a guy with a barge and we could hoist it up on top of the pilings maybe. Hopefully this design would blend in more.

    Good point about the hillside- yeah this lot I have in mind is an old dock jutting out of a steep hillside. The hillside was logged a generation or so a go so I feel like I could get the permit to plant slope-stabilizing hardy palms all over the place fairly easily. With this house over the river framed by the backdrop of a hillside of palms, would be picture perfect. The piling permits aren't actually that hard if the land already possesses them.


    [​IMG]
     
  4. otc

    otc Well-Known Member

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    I like the idea of houses on stilts or otherwise raised (loved that picture of the tokyo house over carport in the small spaces thread).

    That being said...I think I have an aversion to design that attempts to capture the past rather than pushing forth with the new (especially using things like faux-columns that are not needed to support structures with modern building materials).
     
  5. SField

    SField Well-Known Member

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    I think that much better than going for a traditional facsimile you should have a good architect reinterpret the idioms and ideas you present into something that is new and an idea in and of itself.

    The photos you've come up with would look retarded in oregon. In fact they'd look retarded anywhere but Bangkok.
     
  6. Mr.Pinchy

    Mr.Pinchy Well-Known Member

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    The photos you've come up with would look retarded in oregon. In fact they'd look retarded anywhere but Bangkok.

    We don't use that word on here. Oh wait I'm on styleforum.
     
  7. Nomad_K

    Nomad_K Well-Known Member

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    Having also lived in SE Asia for a little while I think that this style looks okay - when done well and in context (SE Asia or at least a tropical location). I do not think it would be practical in many places, and might not 'age' well, visually outside of SE Asia.

    If you want to try it out though - do it and enjoy it.
     
  8. krillin

    krillin Active Member

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    why not take something thai in concept but go modern? i think the grand thai houses have big courtyards and seperate areas for kitchen, sleeping, dining. living that are a few minutes walk from one another. perhaps you could do that if you have a huge property.

    here's a nice singaporean colonial.

    http://www.architecturaldigest.com/h...Navsingaporean house.

    a little bit more modern but still decidedly asian.
    http://ctoarchitects.com/

    what do you guys think?
     
  9. Svenn

    Svenn Well-Known Member

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    here's a nice singaporean colonial.

    http://www.architecturaldigest.com/h...Navsingaporean house.

    a little bit more modern but still decidedly asian.
    http://ctoarchitects.com/

    what do you guys think?


    I like the Singaporean colonial, it kind of has the air of an officer's bungalow in the Raj in a Rudyard Kipling book (Jungle Book, Riki-tiki-tavi) or something.

    [​IMG]
     
  10. Concordia

    Concordia Well-Known Member

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  11. RJman

    RJman Well-Known Member

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    The OP must be more optimistic about the practice of law than I am.
     
  12. mafoofan

    mafoofan Well-Known Member

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    Unless you're living in southeast Asia, or a jungle-like environment, I can't see how such a house won't look ridiculous. It'll be like Epcot center, but with only one country represented and none of the fun stuff around it.
     
  13. johnapril

    johnapril Well-Known Member

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    Why not move to SEA, buy an old house, and restore?
     
  14. yerfdog

    yerfdog Well-Known Member

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    an oasis entirely cut off from the surrounding environment so I can forget that I live in this depressing place.
    Why don't you just move to Southeast Asia then? Or at least someplace less depressing to you than western Oregon? edit: or see johnapril's suggestion above
     

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