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Things that you know that kids now will probably never understand

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by j, Mar 27, 2006.

  1. skalogre

    skalogre Well-Known Member

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    Those were the first two computers I used, from about the time I was 5. After that, the Apple IIE and the Apple IIGS.

    Here's another one that kids won't know - the big floppy disks that were actually floppy.


    And they made a funny sound when vigorously bent and waved about[​IMG]
    Yes, I am easily amused, lol.
     
  2. tiger02

    tiger02 Well-Known Member

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    And they made a funny sound when vigorously bent and waved about[​IMG]
    Yes, I am easily amused, lol.

    Do you know how long it took me to figure out that 3.5" floppys were not 'hard disks?' I mean, c'mon, who calls those things floppy?
     
  3. Matt

    Matt Well-Known Member

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    I remember my first computer: a Commodore 64 and my second computer, a Commodore 128. I also remember programming in BASIC in DOS.

    Jon.

    god bless the c64 i had like thousands of games for that thing.
     
  4. visionology

    visionology Well-Known Member

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    First game i ever played for the computer was on the 5 1/4" real floppy. Was Disney's Donald Duck Adventure. I remember putting the disk in, then leaving the room while you waited for it to load on the computer. I think with each generation our patience level must decrease because now if something doesn't load immediately on my computer I get frustrated and angry.
     
  5. skalogre

    skalogre Well-Known Member

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    Do you know how long it took me to figure out that 3.5" floppys were not 'hard disks?' I mean, c'mon, who calls those things floppy?

    I remember reading in an issue of Amiga Format (woohoo, that mag was great) that 3.5" disks were called "stiffies" in South Africa. May not be true but amusing nonetheless [​IMG]
     
  6. skalogre

    skalogre Well-Known Member

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    First game i ever played for the computer was on the 5 1/4" real floppy. Was Disney's Donald Duck Adventure. I remember putting the disk in, then leaving the room while you waited for it to load on the computer. I think with each generation our patience level must decrease because now if something doesn't load immediately on my computer I get frustrated and angry.

    Yeah. I remember Amsoft's Sultan's Maze... would take ~9 minutes to load from the tape on my Amstrad CPC 464!!!! And now I get angry when Battlefield 2 takes a minute to log me in to the map, lol.
     
  7. j

    j Well-Known Member

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    Yeah. I remember Amsoft's Sultan's Maze... would take ~9 minutes to load from the tape on my Amstrad CPC 464!!!! And now I get angry when Battlefield 2 takes a minute to log me in to the map, lol.
    You beat me with that one, but I remember loading King's Quest I for Apple II from multiple 5-1/4" disks and if you walked the wrong way off the screen, you'd have to load the whole next disk and then walk back and load the right one again... To think we put up with that and played through the whole game.

    Also, writing our own games in GW- or QBASIC and our own menus and little programs in DOS batch script, programming for Telegard and Renegade BBS software, drawing ANSI art, playing Tradewars 2002 and other door games... How cool I felt when my BBS showed up in Puget Sound Computer User's listing without my sending it in... red boxing pay phones for free calls even though we didn't know anyone to call.. [​IMG] Yes, I was a nerd.
     
  8. imageWIS

    imageWIS Well-Known Member

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    You beat me with that one, but I remember loading King's Quest I for Apple II from multiple 5-1/4" disks and if you walked the wrong way off the screen, you'd have to load the whole next disk and then walk back and load the right one again... To think we put up with that and played through the whole game.

    Also, writing our own games in GW- or QBASIC and our own menus and little programs in DOS batch script, programming for Telegard and Renegade BBS software, drawing ANSI art, playing Tradewars 2002 and other door games... How cool I felt when my BBS showed up in Puget Sound Computer User's listing without my sending it in... red boxing pay phones for free calls even though we didn't know anyone to call.. [​IMG] Yes, I was a nerd.


    That's funny... "was".

    Jon.
     
  9. Tyto

    Tyto Well-Known Member

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    I think they do but they are not the pen and paper of the heyday, more like video game versions.
    I think D&D version 3.5 (print) is only a couple of years old. I actually attended a gaming convention last year, and paper-and-pencil RPGs had a pretty good turnout among younger folks.

    As as for computers, what about the Timex Sinclair 1000? 1 BIG kilobyte of memory, expandable to 17. We had to duct tape the memory expansion into the machine, or a slamming door elsewhere in the house would jar it loose, and you'd lose your data. Games like Serpentine were provided in magazines--you'd program them in BASIC (and, I think, in LOGO), save them to tape, and play 'em. What an upgrade the Trash-80s and Apple IIes were....
     
  10. VMan

    VMan Well-Known Member

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    How about games like Oregon Trail and Number Munchers?

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I remember one time I got up to like level 36 on Number Munchers. We honestly played it in class for 2 hours, took a recess break (on the playground we all plotted the best next moves), came back from recess and played it for another hour. I can't believe the teacher let us do that.
     
  11. tiger02

    tiger02 Well-Known Member

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    So much for all those arguments that we were always playing outside and kids today never get the chance [​IMG]
     
  12. j

    j Well-Known Member

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    How about games like Oregon Trail and Number Munchers?

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I remember one time I got up to like level 36 on Number Munchers. We honestly played it in class for 2 hours, took a recess break (on the playground we all plotted the best next moves), came back from recess and played it for another hour. I can't believe the teacher let us do that.

    [​IMG]
     
  13. visionology

    visionology Well-Known Member

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    ^ haha awesome shirt [​IMG] There must have been more than 24 hours in the day when I was a child because I can recall having enough time to be outside all day playing with friends, building forts, hiking along railroad tracks, and then fitting in enough time to beat my nintendo games and still be ready when mom yelled "suppppper's ready!" from the balcony of our home. The only thing we were missing was a big ol' cow bell.
     
  14. kabert

    kabert Well-Known Member

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    - flashlight tag
    - building treeforts from wood and nails stolen from a nearby housing development
    - wackypacks and baseball cards
    - ticktacking on Mischief Night (Oct. 30th)
    - making forts in the "way-back" of the stationwagon for long car trips
    - going to video game arcades
    - 20 questions-games on car trips
     
  15. Brian SD

    Brian SD Well-Known Member

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    Man, I remember getting to level 30 on Number Munchers (Factors, of course, was my favorite). It was awesome. I love that game. I also helped teachers work their computers in Elementary school. A teacher from a different class would call my teacher and send me over to fix their computer.

    I'm going to keep all my old records, so that when my kids ask me "Hey did you ever listen to the Flaming Lips" I'll just say "There is a god. There is a god."
     
  16. Aaron

    Aaron Well-Known Member

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    Man, I remember getting to level 30 on Number Munchers (Factors, of course, was my favorite). It was awesome. I love that game. I also helped teachers work their computers in Elementary school. A teacher from a different class would call my teacher and send me over to fix their computer.

    I'm going to keep all my old records, so that when my kids ask me "Hey did you ever listen to the Flaming Lips" I'll just say "There is a god. There is a god."

    Whoa! Number Munchers! I totally forgot about that game. Did anybody play Oregon Trail? I also remember a game that taught left and right, reflection and the like, it had something to do with a large gorilla.

    It will be very interesting to see what kind of audio formats will be around in 30+ years. I suspect it will all move onto hard drives, mp3 players, and the like. I just hope I'll be able to play my Dylan and Morrison albums to my kids on vinyl.

    As for things I would like to add:
    -Computer disks the size of...wait, computer disks in general.
    -Cars without power steering

    A.
     
  17. shellshock

    shellshock Well-Known Member

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    Man, I remember getting to level 30 on Number Munchers (Factors, of course, was my favorite). It was awesome. I love that game.

    ugh screw math, it's all about Word Rescue.

    i really miss old Apogee games. [​IMG]
     
  18. Huntsman

    Huntsman Well-Known Member

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    Pivoting off of Aaron: -Cars with four wheel drums -Cars with bias-ply tyres -Navigation with a paper map
     
  19. Tck13

    Tck13 Well-Known Member

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    I remember my first computer: a Commodore 64 and my second computer, a Commodore 128. I also remember programming in BASIC in DOS.

    Jon.



    10 Print "insert word here"

    20 Goto 10

    That was hours of fun right there baby!
     
  20. Oddly Familiar

    Oddly Familiar Well-Known Member

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    I'm going to keep all my old records, so that when my kids ask me "Hey did you ever listen to the Flaming Lips" I'll just say "There is a god. There is a god."

    YOSHIME!!!

    Do you listen to the Pixies, too?
     

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