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Things That Are Bothering You, Got You All Hibbeldy-Jibbeldy, or just downright pissed, RIGHT NOW!

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by Bergdorf Goodwill, Feb 7, 2007.

  1. GoSurface

    GoSurface Well-Known Member

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    Witnessing really beautiful photographic moments and not having my camera with me. [​IMG]
     
  2. whodini

    whodini Well-Known Member

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    I am so glad that somebody else has taken on the responsibility for arguing with the lunacy that is Tie Collector.

    My wife is first or second generation American from Mexico (nobody is really sure which side her father was born on) on one side and the other side of her family moved west in covered wagons. I think that is what is good with America, the idea that we gain culture from those who choose to move here, and they gain from our culture and economy. The more the merrier IMO.

    As far as the signs in other languages, the signs are there to attract the customers to the business. If they weren't helpind do that, they would change them to English. I can't think how it hurts anybody what language signs are in, as long as the business is following the law and paying taxes, the more business in the US the better.


    I'm beginning to think that maybe you and I can be friends after all.

    ...

    Jon.

    While you're still an idiot.

    Geez. Sensitive out to prove themselves intellectuals take shit too seriously.
    Let's recap.
    It is dissapointing in the ethnic ghettos where they put everything in their own language, basically trying to keep non-local immigrants out because a lot of times i'd like to eat at some of those places.
    You came off, at least to me, as though you were complaining that certain "ethnic" businesses were going out of their way to keep you out by pandering to a specific clientele. And all because you can't read the name of the restaurant? [​IMG]
    How you assume the employees wouldn't speak english and/or try to help you learn something about a different culture is beyond me.

    People tend to take culture extremely personally, with good reason, but a business is a business. Would you walk into plumbing supply store and complain that they're too standoffish with non-plumbers?

    Let's put this in terms of clothing for you. Imagine one day five years ago you were walking down the street and came across a store called "Self Edge." Hanging in the window were pairs of jeans with brands you had never heard of before. You saw an article taped to the door that used terms like "selvage," "shuttle looms," "roping," and "14oz." Would that really have you running back to your friends at Macy's to tell them just how scary something different was? Hell, wasn't this America, land of Levi's and Wranglers? To think that a clothing store IN THE US would cater to a particular niche of customers, use their own vocabulary, and flaunt unfamiliar brands... the nerve.

    Your fear, lack of comfort, concern, or whatever the hell you'll want to call it in your retort does nothing if make you sound naive and childish.

    I think you'd be surprised how many foreigners would love to see someone take an interest in their country just as much as you'd want them to show some for yours.
     
  3. whodini

    whodini Well-Known Member

    Messages:
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    Witnessing really beautiful photographic moments and not having my camera with me. [​IMG]
    +100000000000
     
  4. GQgeek

    GQgeek Well-Known Member

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    possibly. It also has a larger economy than Canada, so it wouldn't be terribly surprising.

    [​IMG] If you're trying to take a swipe at my nationalistic pride, you're doing it with the wrong guy. I have none. [​IMG]
     
  5. tiecollector

    tiecollector Well-Known Member

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    You came off, at least to me, as though you were complaining that certain "ethnic" businesses were going out of their way to keep you out by pandering to a specific clientele. And all because you can't read the name of the restaurant? [​IMG]
    How you assume the employees wouldn't speak english and/or try to help you learn something about a different culture is beyond me.

    People tend to take culture extremely personally, with good reason, but a business is a business. Would you walk into plumbing supply store and complain that they're too standoffish with non-plumbers?

    Let's put this in terms of clothing for you. Imagine one day five years ago you were walking down the street and came across a store called "Self Edge." Hanging in the window were pairs of jeans with brands you had never heard of before. You saw an article taped to the door that used terms like "selvage," "shuttle looms," "roping," and "14oz." Would that really have you running back to your friends at Macy's to tell them just how scary something different was? Hell, wasn't this America, land of Levi's and Wranglers? To think that a clothing store IN THE US would cater to a particular niche of customers, use their own vocabulary, and flaunt unfamiliar brands... the nerve.

    Your fear, lack of comfort, concern, or whatever the hell you'll want to call it in your retort does nothing if make you sound naive and childish.

    I think you'd be surprised how many foreigners would love to see someone take an interest in their country just as much as you'd want them to show some for yours.



    It is really a moot point and the tip of the iceberg for a much larger problem at hand.

    How about getting checks at Chinese restaurants where the itemized list is written in Chinese? Ah yes, I remember ordering that!
     
  6. Get Smart

    Get Smart Well-Known Member

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    I'm beginning to think that maybe you and I can be friends after all.

    I'd like to remind you that you are Matt's turdburglar (just trying to salt your friendship with him because I'm getting jealous) [​IMG]

    and re:not having a camera for photographic moments, I think "photographic moments" are overrated
     
  7. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG] If you're trying to take a swipe at my nationalistic pride, you're doing it with the wrong guy. I have none. [​IMG]
    Not at all, I was just trying to point out that California is not exactly a small place and that you would expect that there would be all sorts of languages spoken here. What never gets said in these conversations about immigration, and especially immigration in California, is how much richness it adds to our everyday lives. I am not talking about having a cheap workforce kind of richness, but rather the added opportunities that we have every day because of the various ethnic groups who live here. It may sound shallow to speak of when discussing a topic that is very important, but there is something amazing about being able to walk into Chinatown and find produce and products not available most places before sitting down to eat in a restaurant that has actually kept some of its true identity because there is a market large enough to support it. The same goes for an area like the Mission where there are still places that cater to a clientele that is newly here and every one of us has the opportunity eat, buy, explore things that in most places are truly unavailable. Unfortunately, these things we tend to take for granted while we complain about some issues that cause very little harm to anybody and probably benefit the state as a whole.
    How about getting checks at Chinese restaurants where the itemized list is written in Chinese? Ah yes, I remember ordering that!
    How about having the opportunity to eat Chinese food that isn't necessarily "Round Eye Special #1"?
     
  8. GoSurface

    GoSurface Well-Known Member

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    I'd like to remind you that you are Matt's turdburglar (just trying to salt your friendship with him because I'm getting jealous) [​IMG]

    and re:not having a camera for photographic moments, I think "photographic moments" are overrated


    I don't mean traditionally 'photographic' moments. I mean moments that are a little askew, that just seem to work, like unexpected balance in disharmony. [​IMG]
     
  9. tiecollector

    tiecollector Well-Known Member

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    What never gets said in these conversations about immigration, and especially immigration in California, is how much richness it adds to our everyday lives. I am not talking about having a cheap workforce kind of richness, but rather the added opportunities that we have every day because of the various ethnic groups who live here. It may sound shallow to speak of when discussing a topic that is very important, but there is something amazing about being able to walk into Chinatown and find produce and products not available most places before sitting down to eat in a restaurant that has actually kept some of its true identity because there is a market large enough to support it. The same goes for an area like the Mission where there are still places that cater to a clientele that is newly here and every one of us has the opportunity eat, buy, explore things that in most places are truly unavailable.

    Unfortunately, these things we tend to take for granted while we complain about some issues that cause very little harm to anybody and probably benefit the state as a whole.

    How about having the opportunity to eat Chinese food that isn't necessarily "Round Eye Special #1"?

    [​IMG]

    Yes, because you can't read or write English to make authentic style Chinese food, right? I bet those white folk cain't cook Gookinamese and cain't cook dem der Mexicaina neither.

    Brings me to another point. I have met "Chinese" people (who have never even been to China) who insist that Chinese food can only be cooked properly by someone who looks Chinese. Sounds very diverse and open minded with added richness.
     
  10. Get Smart

    Get Smart Well-Known Member

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    there is something amazing about being able to walk into Chinatown and find produce and products not available most places before sitting down to eat in a restaurant that has actually kept some of its true identity because there is a market large enough to support it.

    How about having the opportunity to eat Chinese food that isn't necessarily "Round Eye Special #1"?


    I wouldnt mind if it were limited to "walking into Chinatown" to experience all this wonderful "ethnic diversity" but I'm just not a fan of entire neighborhoods aroune me being "chinatown". I just don't like their "authentic" food, don't like the grocery stores....the list goes on. I have to drive 20 minutes just to be able to get a tasty Round Eye Special #1, which I'd rather have any day of the week than something "authentically Chinese".

    On a related note of being pissed....

    I hate it when someone dials my extension at work, I answer in English of course, and the person starts rambling in Chinese, I fume but politely respond that I don't speak Chinese, then the person that was speaking Chinese starts speaking in very good English. WTF is that shit. Probably happens 1x/month. One time some guy came in to discuss a design job and asks me if I speak Chinese. I say I don't and he keeps pushing the issue asking "am I sure I don't speak Chinese" in his perfect English and when I tell him I don't speak any kind of Chinese he says "ok, I guess we can talk in English".

    After writing that last bit I can feel my blood boiling
     
  11. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]

    Yes, because you can't read or write English to make authentic style Chinese food, right? I bet those white folk cain't cook Gookinamese and cain't cook dem der Mexicaina neither.


    You are missing the point.

    The more people you experience with completely different life experiences and skill-sets, the more things you try and eat, the more foreign signs you find yourself able to decipher the bigger and richer your life will be. The more you complain about things that can give you more in life, the smaller you become.
     
  12. lawyerdad

    lawyerdad Well-Known Member

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    I wouldnt mind if it were limited to "walking into Chinatown" to experience all this wonderful "ethnic diversity" but I'm just not a fan of entire neighborhoods aroune me being "chinatown". I just don't like their "authentic" food, don't like the grocery stores....the list goes on. I have to drive 20 minutes just to be able to get a tasty Round Eye Special #1, which I'd rather have any day of the week than something "authentically Chinese".

    On a related note of being pissed....

    I hate it when someone dials my extension at work, I answer in English of course, and the person starts rambling in Chinese, I fume but politely respond that I don't speak Chinese, then the person that was speaking Chinese starts speaking in very good English. WTF is that shit. Probably happens 1x/month. One time some guy came in to discuss a design job and asks me if I speak Chinese. I say I don't and he keeps pushing the issue asking "am I sure I don't speak Chinese" in his perfect English and when I tell him I don't speak any kind of Chinese he says "ok, I guess we can talk in English".

    After writing that last bit I can feel my blood boiling



    That happens all the time to a Korean guy I work with:

    "Do you speak Chinese"?
    "Actually, I'm Korean but grew up in Maryland and don't even speak Korean."
    "Fine, but do you speak Chinese"?
     
  13. gdl203

    gdl203 Well-Known Member

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    I wouldnt mind if it were limited to "walking into Chinatown" to experience all this wonderful "ethnic diversity" but I'm just not a fan of entire neighborhoods aroune me being "chinatown". I just don't like their "authentic" food, don't like the grocery stores....the list goes on. I have to drive 20 minutes just to be able to get a tasty Round Eye Special #1, which I'd rather have any day of the week than something "authentically Chinese".
    Why do you live in this neighborhood since you hate it so much? Do you expect your whole neighborhood to change and adapt to your preferences?

    After writing that last bit I can feel my blood boiling
    Sorry if I sound like an asshole here, but I really think you have some serious identity issues.
     
  14. tiecollector

    tiecollector Well-Known Member

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    Sorry if I sound like an asshole here, but I really think you have some serious identity issues.

    Wow, quite possibly the stupidest thing said in a long ass time here.
     
  15. gdl203

    gdl203 Well-Known Member

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    Wow, quite possibly the stupidest thing said in a long ass time here.

    Not so long. Probably just since your last post?
     
  16. Get Smart

    Get Smart Well-Known Member

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    Why do you live in this neighborhood since you hate it so much? Do you expect your whole neighborhood to change and adapt to your preferences?


    Sorry if I sound like an asshole here, but I really think you have some serious identity issues.



    I've lived in this neighborhood before it changed to this magnitude. I didnt move in and say "hmmm now lookie here, all the chinamen need to change their signs into engrish so I can be comfortable".

    How is it an identity issue if someone asks me in English if I speak Chinese, I say no, and he keeps insisting that I must speak chinese?? One of my biggest pet peeves is when (and oftentimes it's caucasians who do this) it's somehow assumed all asians are culturally the same. It's even worse when another asian does it and just assumes that anyone with slanteyes must be "one of them".

    On the plus side, in regards to my specific neighborhood....it seems more Americanized minorities and whites are moving in and the "authentic" minorities might be on a decline or moving to different areas, at least in my immediate neck o the woods, since the housing here is relatively affordable for a pretty nice area and walking distance to some really nice areas.
     
  17. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Well-Known Member

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    That happens all the time to a Korean guy I work with:

    "Do you speak Chinese"?
    "Actually, I'm Korean but grew up in Maryland and don't even speak Korean."
    "Fine, but do you speak Chinese"?

    It's funny, no white person can believe when my wife tells them that she is Mexican, but 90% of the time when we meet a Mexican person they start out speaking to her in Spanish. She doesn't speak a word of Spanish, so it doesn't last long.
     
  18. gdl203

    gdl203 Well-Known Member

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    How is it an identity issue if someone asks me in English if I speak Chinese, I say no, and he keeps insisting that I must speak chinese??
    The fact you "can feel [your] blood boiling", that it affects you so much that someone assumes you speak Chinese, is what I find disturbing. This cumulated with your obvious issues with new generations of Asian immigrants lead me to think (can't really help it) that you may have identity issues with your ethnicity.

    Now to recap the neighborhood issue, since you've been here before the neighborhood changed so much, you do expect that the neighborhood will change by itself and adapt to what you think it should be?
     
  19. Get Smart

    Get Smart Well-Known Member

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    The fact you "can feel [your] blood boiling", that it affects you so much that someone assumes you speak Chinese, is what I find disturbing. This cumulated with your obvious issues with new generations of Asian immigrants lead me to think (can't really help it) that you may have identity issues with your ethnicity.

    Now to recap the neighborhood issue, since you've been here before the neighborhood changed so much, you do expect that the neighborhood will change by itself and adapt to what you think it should be?


    Why do you find that disturbing? It can be a white guy assuming I am chinese and wondering if I speak English, and my blood would be boiling. Again, the point is, what kind of asshole who can speak perfect english, walks into a business that is clearly not chinese owned, and asks repeatedly if I speak Chinese. It was the most surreal encounter I've ever had with someone because this fellow kept insisting that I know how to speak Chinese and somehow I wasn't willing to do so with him.

    Re my neighborhood....it looked like it was going *downhill* (from my PoV) but with the increasing property prices around SoCal, my area was priced very good for what it has to offer so it seems a lot of middle class people who were looking to buy a house in the LA area started to move in and suddenly over the last 5 years it's slowly but surely changed its makeup towards a *cough* multicultural neighborhood but AMERICANIZED. A few years ago the majority of my neighbors didn't seem to speak much English and werent very friendly in general (asians typically arent that friendly to strangers) and now I say hello and chat with them on a regular basis when I'm washing the car or whatever. I'm hoping it's a trend that continues down this road.
     
  20. lawyerdad

    lawyerdad Well-Known Member

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    Since I'm coaching this year, lame soccer parents. (There are also good ones.)
    And more generally, lame self-indulgent parents who are so afraid of jeopardizing their reputation as one of the "fun" parents that they are unwilling to provide kids with any meaningful discipline or guidance.

    And, of course, the f'ing Dodgers.
     

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